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  #41  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2017, 3:17 AM
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http://atlanticyardsreport.blogspot....ject-huge.html

Proposed 80 Flatbush project a huge increase in bulk over Downtown rezoning; harbinger of Site 5 project?









April 5, 2017


Quote:
Maybe the massive two-tower project proposed as 80 Flatbush, across from BAM, 300 Ashland, and Atlantic Terminal, a good idea. Maybe it's not.

It sure comes with velocity, a press release indicating support from the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and even the New York Landmarks Conservancy.

But it's definitely a very big idea, 1.3 million gross square feet over two main buildings, one 920 feet tall, on a 61,000 square-foot plot of land bordered by Flatbush and Third avenues and Schermerhorn and State streets.

It would be the second-tallest building in Brooklyn. And the square footage means a Floor Area Ratio (FAR)--bulk as multiple of lot size--of 18. That would represent a dramatic increase from the current FAR of 6, which emerged from the 2004 Downton Brooklyn Rezoning, not to mention the maximum Downtown Brooklyn FAR of 12.

Given that dramatic shift--and some opacity regarding the financial aspects--it's not surprising this 80 Flatbush has been presented as a plan for a mixed-use development including two new public schools, market-rate and affordable housing, commercial and even cultural space.

The key elected official, Council Member Steve Levin, told Gothamist he's "eager to see what the public response is" and indicated his own leanings: "I would say that it is a somewhat different scenario than just a private development going for an 18-FAR because it has significant public benefit."

The site needs a spot rezoning, hearings under the Uniform Land Use Review Procedures (ULURP) and an environmental impact statement (EIS). Don't be surprised if the Council Member comes armed with some community "asks" and the developer pares back the proposal for a "win-win."

The headline in the press release was New York City Educational Construction Fund Selects Alloy Development to Build Two New Schools in Downtown Brooklyn. Indeed, the Educational Construction Fund, which finances and develops new public schools, chose Alloy after a response to request for expressions of interest.

What the press release didn't say is that Alloy was chosen to build the giant project announced. It hasn't. Rather, it proposed a project it believes economically viable.

Atlantic Yards echo?

For Atlantic Yards watchers, the development has echoes of the two-tower project floated--but not yet formally proposed--for Site 5, now home to P.C. Richard and Modell's, involving the shift of bulk approved for what's now the arena plaza across the street.

At 1.1 million square feet and up to 785 feet tall, the Site 5 project might be presented a slightly more modest than 80 Flatbush. Actually, given that the Site 5 project would be on a smaller plot, at 48,655 square feet, the FAR could exceed 22.


Both projects would, on one flank, border a narrow street with row houses: Site 5 bordering Pacific Street and 80 Flatbush bordering State Street. The Brooklyn Paper, identifying 80 Flatbush as "on the eastern edge of very low-rise Boerum Hill," suggested neighbors would oppose it.

“It’s a massive project,” Boerum Hill Association Howard Kolins said. “Virtually nothing (in the proposal) is a benefit for people living there. You have to brace yourself for a large high rise that you’d rather not be there.”


Actually, 80 Flatbush overlaps neighborhoods. While this New York Times article identifies the site as the northeast tip of Boerum Hill, it was included in the 2004 Downtown Brooklyn rezoning.

If the 80 Flatbush template proves successful, the developer of Site 5 might have to come up with some educational or cultural use to draw focus from the increase in bulk. While Site 5 is being promoted as an iconic office building--though some versions suggested would have more apartments--80 Flatbush would be predominantly residential, with 200,000 square feet of office space.

Structure of the deal

Such projects take a while. Alloy anticipates construction of 80 Flatbush starting no earlier than 2019, with Phase 1 (schools and smaller, triangular tower) finished by 2022 and Phase 2 (larger tower and rehabilitation of existing structures) not until 2025. There'd be 700 market-rate units and 200 affordable ones for low-income households earning 60 percent of Area Median Income, according to Politico.

ECF selected Alloy as the developer of the proposed project, and will be co-applicant with Alloy on the ULURP application. The proposal includes 120,000 gross square feet (gsf) of new schools, with the taller building 730,000 gsf and the smaller one 430,000 gsf.

(By the way, the 1,066-foot supertall tower planned near Junior's, the borough's tallest, would be relatively narrow and contain 556,164 square feet.)

Alloy, explained spokesman James Yolles, now owns about 75% of the site and New York City owns about 25%. Alloy has agreed to build two new schools (funded by bonds floated by ECF), build a 200,000 square foot residential portion--all market-rate--in the first tower, and lease that space for 99 years, with the ground rent and tax equivalency payments covering debt service on the bonds. The city would put up no capital funds.

Alloy CEO Jared Della Valle told Politico he would not disclose the amount his company would pay, saying he is "under a confidential agreement with the city." Yolles told me "Alloy is currently in active discussions with ECF around the project site."

The schools would be separate structures in the middle of the block. The lower school entrance would be on State State street, the high school on Flatbush Avenue, with shared facilities (cafeteria, gym) connecting them in the middle.

The obligation to ECF is satisfied once the schools and Non-School Portion are finished, Yolles said, but the "feasibility of the entire project is linked."

In a letter, Della Valle and colleague AJ Pires called "80 Flatbush is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to contribute to the borough’s identity," adding that talking with neighbors "helped us recognize that two existing buildings... merit preservation and incorporation into the master plan" and that a cluster of buildings would be superior to a "single building on a large podium." Easier to finance, too, I'd bet.
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  #42  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2018, 1:48 AM
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Originally Posted by NYguy View Post
https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/201...arclays-center

Developers Eye Two Sites for Office Towers Around Barclays Center





The developers of the Pacific Park complex, formerly Atlantic Yards, are eyeing two new locations to build office towers within the 22-acre development, including a possible 1.5-million-square-foot building revealed last week.

Representatives of the developer, Greenland Forest City Partners, shared a rough sketch of the plan with residents at a public meeting Wednesday, focusing on two sites surrounding the Barclays Center: 580 Atlantic Ave., currently occupied by Modell’s and P.C. Richard & Son, and a lot at the southwest corner of Atlantic and Sixth avenues directly behind the arena known as B4.

Currently, usage of the B4 site is limited to residential and “some retail” by a state-approved project plan, said GFCP spokeswoman Ashley Cotton. But the company is hoping the state will allow office space to be built there by shifting commercial rights — previously reserved for another Pacific Park building, 461 Dean St. on Flatbush Avenue — to the Atlantic Avenue site.

The B4 building would act as a bookend, she said, to a much larger building GFCP is planning to build nearby. That tower, at 580 Atlantic Ave., or “Site 5,” would use up to 1.1 million square feet of air rights currently controlled by the developers in front of the Barclays Center — where the subway station, plaza and distinctive “oculus” feature on the arena are now located — combined with 439,000 buildable square feet currently allowed on Site 5.



The plan for the smaller tower has been dropped, it will remain a residential tower...



https://ny.curbed.com/2018/1/16/1689...ce-development

Developer ditches plans to swap Pacific Park residential building for office space
Greenland USA will stick to the original plan instead






By Ameena Walker
Jan 16, 2018


Quote:
Developers Greenland USA are scrapping plans to convert one of the sites at Pacific Park from a residential building to an office tower.

The Real Deal reports that the site east of the Barclays Center between Atlantic and Sixth avenues, also known as B4, will remain residential after developers decided that it was “better suited” for the original plan. In 2016, Greenland USA revealed that they would aim to utilize the site for commercial use instead of residential with affordable housing. The intent was to transfer rights from the B2 site, where a residential building rose at 461 Dean Street instead of a commercial development, to the B4 site. However, Greenland USA never formally requested permission from the Empire State Development Corporation.

Construction on site B4 is expected to break ground some time in 2019. It remains to be seen whether the plan is still to offer a mix of rentals and condos within the building.


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Last edited by NYguy; Jan 18, 2018 at 1:59 AM.
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  #43  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2018, 5:12 AM
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  #44  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 1:22 AM
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In the rendering, the tower appears to be above 700 ft, possibly 800 ft.






Site 5 is indicated by the green arrow at the far left.



https://atlanticyardsreport.blogspot...gevity-of.html

January 17, 2018

Quote:
One looming question about Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park is the fate of Site 5, currently home to P.C. Richard and Modell's, at the parcel bounded by Fourth, Atlantic, and Flatbush avenues, and Pacific Street.

According to plans floated in 2016, that site, slated for a 250-foot tower with 440,000 square feet, could turn into a two-tower project stretching 785 feet tall and nearly three times the bulk.

How would that happen? State approval is still needed to shift bulk from the unbuilt B1 site, aka "Miss Brooklyn," the tower over the arena plaza, and that has been delayed by a legal challenge to the condemnation from P.C. Richard.

But the approval process for that huge project--even suggested last year as a potential home for Amazon.com's second headquarters--may move forward this year. So Jaime Stein, the board member of the Atlantic Yards Community Development Corporation (AY CDC) who's pushed the most for oversight, has suggested protecting the public interest by promoting more public discussion and engagement.

This project's different

The draft recommendations (bottom), already shared with community organizations and governmental bodies, argue that the "complexity and longevity of the AY Project requires this additional, independent process." There's a logic to that: rarely has this project been seen whole, and past examinations have ignored key elements of the project.

The draft, likely to be discussed at today's AY CDC meeting, may be Stein's last legacy: she's not expected to remain on the board for long.

Essentially, Stein would like the AY CDC to serve more as an advocate for the public interest, a separate node beyond its parent Empire State Development (ESD), which has the dual--and potentially contradictory--role of overseeing the project while shepherding it forward.

The challenge is convincing the AY CDC board itself, controlled by gubernatorial appointees, and the parent ESD, to add a layer of scrutiny that the developer and, likely, the state would rather avoid, and which may be dismissed as duplicative.

Recommendation: new third-party advocates

Stein suggests that, when the Site 5 proposal is released, the AY CDC Board and ESD should hire third-party planning, design and construction consultants to review the proposal to inform the board and the public.

Those consultants would convene and facilitate at least two preliminary public meetings and then share community priority issues with the board, which is supposed to advise ESD.

Interestingly, Stein recommends that consultants be hired prior to the public release of the Site 5 proposal, with access and review of all relevant documents, and that there are at least eight weeks between the public release of the Site 5 proposal and the AY CDC Board vote. (Alternatively, presumably the consultants could be hired after the public release, as long as there was more time in between.)

The likely response--as we've heard already, when Stein raised the issue at an AY CDC--is that this duplicates the current environmental review process. But that assumes that AKRF, the state's ubiquitous environmental consultant, is hired by ESD to protect the public interest rather than to ensure a project passes legal muster.

Recommendation: broader review

Given an expected Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS), Stein recommends that the draft scope for that SEIS be reviewed broadly rather than narrowly: "within the context of the entire project going back to 2006."

There's a logic to that, given that, for example, the previous SEIS addressed only Phase 2 of the project, east of Sixth Avenue, even as Phase 1 elements, including towers around the arena block, were unbuilt, and arena operations contained elements never expected or examined.

Stein suggests a public informational meeting (organized collaboratively with all impacted Community Boards), a review of past state studies, site tours, and another public informational meeting.

The goal is to advise on what should be studied in the SEIS, and to provide resources to the Board and public

Recommendation: a role for AY CDC

The consultant would prepare the AY CDC Board to make recommendations, and provide a public document digesting public responses and comments.

Finally, once the ESD board votes (inevitably) to approve changes to the General Project Plan (GPP), the consultant would present the new documents, the SEIS and the Modified GPP, in a public informational meeting, organized with impacted Community Boards, including the state and AY CDC Board.

https://www.scribd.com/document/3692...CDC#from_embed
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  #45  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2018, 6:28 PM
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https://thebridgebk.com/forest-city-...n-the-way-out/

Forest City in Brooklyn: a Real Estate Pioneer on the Way Out?
The developer behind MetroTech and Barclays Center changed the borough's landscape. An in-depth look at a towering yet sometimes controversial legacy


By NORMAN ODER
March 20, 2018


Quote:
Back in 1990, Ratner was asked, upon announcing what would be the borough’s second tallest tower, if he’d considered breaking the height record. ”We’re not into that,” he said. By 2003, though, Gehry’s “Miss Brooklyn” was to dwarf the 512-foot Williamsburgh Savings Bank. In a nod to public concern, Forest City, upon the 2006 Atlantic Yards approval, agreed to lower Gehry’s tower one foot below the bank, without reducing the bulk.

Today, such a gesture would seem quaint. New Downtown Brooklyn edifices dwarf the bank, renamed One Hanson Place, its offices turned into condos. Across the street, an Apple Store and Whole Foods 365 recently opened in 300 Ashland, a Two Trees tower. The new owner of the Atlantic Terminal and Atlantic Center malls plans to double the rents, adding upscale tenants.

Meanwhile, Greenland Forest City aims to move the bulk of the unbuilt “Miss Brooklyn” across Flatbush Avenue to a site currently housing a Modell’s and P.C. Richards, envisioning a two-tower complex nearly 800 feet tall. The project, yet to be approved, has been suggested for Amazon’s second headquarters and would contain high-end retail—a distinct contrast from Ratner’s early mall strategy. Up Flatbush Avenue, near Junior’s Restaurant, a supertall tower, some 1,066 feet, is rising. Even closer, just two blocks from the Barclays Center, developer Alloy has proposed 80 Flatbush, a huge two-tower project stretching 986 feet. Seeking permission to build what some call “unprecedented” density near row houses, Alloy promises schools, cultural space, and affordable housing. Such large projects—and com
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  #46  
Old Posted May 17, 2018, 3:57 PM
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https://therealdeal.com/2018/05/17/a...-office-tower/

Adding some zeroes: Is Pacific Park ready for a 1M sf office tower?

By Kathryn Brenzel
May 17, 2018


Quote:
The fate of the development site across the street from the Barclays Center remains unclear, but developer MaryAnne Gilmartin is confident that a massive-mixed-use tower can rise there.

Gilmartin, former CEO of Forest City New York and co-founder of L&L MAG, thinks Pacific Park is “missing zeroes” for majority owner Greenland USA — in terms of the megadevelopment’s scale and the company’s equity check. Building a 1 million-square-foot-plus tower with significant office space at site five — occupied by P.C. Richard & Son and a Modell’s — would help amend that, she said

Quote:
Such a building would require public approvals and the transfer of air rights from the arena. Those rights were once pegged for a 62-story skyscraper next to the arena, designed by Frank Gehry and dubbed “Miss Brooklyn.”

“To me, at the end of the day, it seems to me a much better urban planning decision to put more density on that site than to muck up our beautiful arena by landing a building in front of it,” she told The Real Deal after the panel.
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  #47  
Old Posted May 18, 2018, 6:04 PM
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I can't wait for this tower.

At 800 ft, I should actually have dead-on views of the completed tower from my apartment window.
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  #48  
Old Posted May 19, 2018, 3:42 AM
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I notice someone has been demolishing and assembling the eastern portion of the block directly south of site 5, where the Shake Shack is (Flatbush @ Fifth). I read somewhere the plan was for a three floor office building, which just seems ridiculous, especially if 5 is getting a 700/800 footer.

I'm also curious to see what happens to that small triangle bound by Flatbush, Fifth and Dean now that the building has been emptied and shuttered. Broccolino must be curious too! I'm not sure I believe this:
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.tim...?source=images

Quote:
The new owner of the Atlantic Terminal and Atlantic Center malls plans to double the rents, adding upscale tenants.
This just seems terribly misguided, apparently they either have no clue who the shoppers are there (it's always very crowded with mostly working class families and teens) or they somehow plan to lure wealthier customers, of which there are far fewer, and who generally don't go to complexes like this. Even City Point hasn't gone super upscale. Besides, we need our Chuckie Cheese, discount clothing stores and DSW!

Last edited by Sloper; May 19, 2018 at 5:16 AM.
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  #49  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2018, 9:15 PM
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This is going up directly across 4th from 590 Atlantic:







Also, here is the demolished parcel I wrote about in my previous post (5th & Flatbush):



And just for context, here's some shots of the east side of the yards, it appears they're getting ready to deck over some tracks:







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  #50  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2018, 2:31 PM
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That storage mart should be converted into lofts. It looks like something out of tribeca.
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  #51  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 5:39 PM
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well at least it looks nice.
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  #52  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 7:13 PM
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I like developments like this. Its like a mini-city. Really, NY needs more of these multi-tower, multi-block developments. Master planning seems to produce monotonous towers, but if done right, it can actually be beneficial. Nothing from with master plans, so long as the developer puts effort and attempts to integrate the new development with its surroundings. So things like street-tower interface, proper retail allocation, not to overly grandiose or flashy (in other words, won't stick out like a sore thumb).
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  #53  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2018, 6:57 PM
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There's a development sign now on a building directly east of 590 Atlantic, and across Flatbush from Barclays (those bollards are for the arena & subway entrance). There's a pop-up Puma shop next to that, and a Shake Shack, and the rest of the block fronting the arena has been demolished. The building with the development sign is at Pacific & Flatbush, and as I said before, I'm guessing someone is assembling the sites for something probably retail/entertainment, but I don't think anything tall can be built here because of all the brownstones also on the block.



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  #54  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2018, 7:29 PM
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The website advertised on the building is more interesting than I expected, it seems to show that a building is already designed for just that parcel, but I'm skeptical. Anyway, the website is worth visiting just for the drone footage, which shows Atlantic Yards (er, Pacific Park) pretty well as it stands, and the 590 Atlantic parcel too:

www.brooklynflagship.com
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  #55  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2018, 9:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Sloper View Post
The website advertised on the building is more interesting than I expected, it seems to show that a building is already designed for just that parcel, but I'm skeptical. Anyway, the website is worth visiting just for the drone footage, which shows Atlantic Yards (er, Pacific Park) pretty well as it stands, and the 590 Atlantic parcel too:

www.brooklynflagship.com
Thanks. That rendering also looks close to what's on that bottom photo.


Video Link












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  #56  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2018, 2:27 AM
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With a (somewhat) victory at 80 Flatbush, NIMBYs turn their hopes here...


https://atlanticyardsreport.blogspot...is-modest.html

The 80 Flatbush compromise is modest; Site 5 project nearby may gain momentum


September 21, 2018


Quote:
What about Site 5?


Now that that project is resolved, perhaps there's more chance for momentum on a similarly large, two-tower project just down the block, the revision of plans for Site 5, part of Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park, currently home to Modell's and P.C. Richard, and bounded by Fourth, Flatbush, and Atlantic avenues, and Pacific Street.

A lawsuit between P.C. Richard and its landlord, Forest City New York (formerly Forest City Ratner), has stalled that project, but presumably a settlement is possible when developer Greenland Forest City Partners--owned 95% going forward by Greenland USA--decides to move forward.

Unlike 80 Flatbush, which went through the city's Uniform Land Use Review Procedure, requiring City Council approval and giving a large role to the local City Council Member, the Site 5 plan only requires approval by Empire State Development, the state economic development authority, controlled by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

So its path should be easier. That said, the two projects, though both bordering wide avenues as well as a row-house block, are not the same. 80 Flatbush was proposed at a very large Floor Area Ratio, 18, and revised to 15.5. (FAR is a metric describing bulk as a multiple of a fully covered lot; most lots, of course, are not fully covered.)

The Site 5 project FAR has not been publicly stated, but could be even larger; I calculated the previously floated proposal at 23.5.
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