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  #41  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 2:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Jets4Life View Post
Not that much higher. In the future, we will be a "have" province.
You're right - not a lot higher, but still higher. Maybe we will be have in the future though I really doubt it. As long as Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Newfoundland inflate the average so much, it will be a hard bar to reach.
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  #42  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 5:24 AM
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If you compare the numbers to GDP and the "need" for support, Quebec gets more than it should considering it is a "have" province and has a robust, diverse, strong economy.
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  #43  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 12:07 PM
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If you compare the numbers to GDP and the "need" for support, Quebec gets more than it should considering it is a "have" province and has a robust, diverse, strong economy.
Actually, again, not really. Their per capita GDP is less than ours (they're poorer per person than we are), yet we get more equalization per capita than they do.
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  #44  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 1:08 PM
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If you compare the numbers to GDP and the "need" for support, Quebec gets more than it should considering it is a "have" province and has a robust, diverse, strong economy.
About 15% of Quebec has basically the same economic profile as the poorer parts of Atlantic Canada. That explains a lot.
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  #45  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2018, 10:25 PM
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the old conservatory closed on Sunday.

Conservatory grows memories
Today is the final day to visit city's longtime lush getaway
Melissa Martin By: Melissa Martin
Posted: 04/2/2018 3:00 AM

On the path, amongst the green, Hannon Bell stands and clasps the black-and-white photo to his chest.

Forty years have passed between the man in that photo, and the one here today. In those 40 years, Bell has changed: he’s gained a bit at the waist, and a whole lot more grey. But the place is almost exactly the same.

The conservatory was bustling Sunday.</p></p>
The conservatory was bustling Sunday.

It was right around here, he says, or maybe a few feet to the west. Flashback to 1978, when Bell and his sister worked as fashion models for Eaton’s and The Bay.

For this photo shoot, they came to this warm, sun-lit place.

He holds out the photos, resplendent with 1970s fashion glory: dark moustache, slick-fitted suit. But there, in the background, is the same brick wall. The same brick wall and sprays of leaves that surround him here today.

The Assiniboine Park Conservatory has aged too, in the last 40 years. But mostly, it has not changed.

Since his modelling days, Bell has had many adventures. In addition to a long career as a real estate agent, he became a connoisseur of nostalgia: a classic car enthusiast, a renowned Elizabeth Taylor memorabilia collector.

Now, on the penultimate day of the conservatory’s public life, Bell finds that nostalgic instinct renewed.

"When I walked in here, I immediately was hit with summer," he says as he gazes at the sea of green. "I know that time marches on, and you have to change. But it’s a shame when something is so iconic and around for so long.

"We’re just wondering if that new building will have the same (feeling). Well, probably in 20 or 30 years it will."

And if Bell came here to remember, then everyone else did, too. The day before the conservatory was set to close forever, the place filled up with visitors, mingling in the smell of damp dirt and someone else’s Sunday perfume.

It is so busy, that the meandering paths are jammed up with people. So busy, that the lazy stroll typical of most conservatory visits is seized to a halting shuffle. So busy, that volunteers can’t remember it ever being busier.

All over the building, families came here to remember. Parents take photos of toddlers. Grandparents pose for pictures taken by adult grandchildren. Students settle into a crouch, snapping close-up photos of flowers.

On the edge of the path, sitting on a bench donated in memory of someone who passed, I think about flora.

There is so much of it here, splayed out in the sunlight, all of it clamouring to be seen. The bench where I sit is flanked by shoots of chestnut vine and philodendron gloriosum that reach into an indiscriminate tangle of green.

In front of me is a triangle palm, dypsis decaryi, the conservatory holds two. Its leaves fan up into a geometric display, an angular statement from which the tree gets its name; it is beautiful, unfamiliar and so very alive.

There are only about 1,000 of these trees left in the wild southern reach of Madagascar.

One of things that abetted the species’ decline is fire; the other is the fact that, it being pretty, its seeds were taken for international growers.

And there is no forest like this, in the wild. Not where plants from India rub leaves with trees from Peru or Japan, where bamboo casts gentle shadows on Jamaican pepper. We created places like this, to see the green world.

So, in that light, the conservatory became an intersection for all the ways we relate to growing things. Botanists offered workshops on palm trees or shrubs; couples came to get flower-spangled photos for their wedding day.

Or else, it was a refuge in winter, a place for families to escape from the cold. A place where, as a young child, I squeezed my dad’s hand and gazed up at the fronds hanging above; a place to learn about all the world holds.

Now, near the end of its life, the conservatory offers lessons of another kind.

"See that?" a man says to his daughter, and points to the struts near where brick wall meets glass ceiling. "That’s where the building is rusting from the water. That’s called corrosion."

And it is age that will shutter the conservatory, starting Tuesday and hereafter. Age, time and the idea of something greater: the vision laid out for the park’s new addition, the Diversity Gardens, is spectacular, a $60-million dream.

Big dreams, these days, cost big money. There will be an admission fee for the new glass building, which is set to open in 2020. The conservatory was free, a place for everybody. So few things these days are a welcome to all.

Yet, all things must go and all things must change. So, on this day, a pause to acknowledge its passing.

A century ago, Winnipeggers made a space to breathe — in every season, but especially in winter.

A space to remember what it means to be enveloped by green, growing things. A space where life unfurled its wonders.

There it stood, tended by generations. The memories made in that space wove tendrils through time, leaving their imprint on modelling photos and memorial benches. The one I’m sitting on recalls a man named Peter Pellaers.

Underneath his name, an inscription: "There is no better place than a garden to sit and savour the moments."

I hope we did enough of that, while the conservatory was with us. I hope we do it more, in the years without.

melissa.martin@freepress.mb.ca

https://www.winnipegfreepress.com/lo...478508303.html
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  #46  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2018, 10:29 PM
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I’ll admit I haven’t paid much attention to the “protests” and complaints about admission for this project... but unless there’s truly something amazing to see here, I have a hard time seeing many people interested to pay to go into this place. If that’s the case, should have been part of the zoo.
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  #47  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 12:24 AM
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Originally Posted by buzzg View Post
I’ll admit I haven’t paid much attention to the “protests” and complaints about admission for this project... but unless there’s truly something amazing to see here, I have a hard time seeing many people interested to pay to go into this place. If that’s the case, should have been part of the zoo.
It appears to be (much) more impressive than the Muttart in Edmonton, and there is definitely a fee to go take a gander there.
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  #48  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 3:10 PM
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I actually took last thursday off to take my niece to the Conservatory. I havent been since I was a kid and remember it being bigger! lol

I have no problem with a reasonable fee for the new place. If we want nice things we have to pay.

Is there a plan for disposal of all the plants and trees?
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  #49  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 3:24 PM
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Originally Posted by buzzg View Post
I’ll admit I haven’t paid much attention to the “protests” and complaints about admission for this project... but unless there’s truly something amazing to see here, I have a hard time seeing many people interested to pay to go into this place. If that’s the case, should have been part of the zoo.
Yeah but the fee will keep the riff raff and undesirables from visiting the new gardens and maybe the park itself, maybe that was the intent all along. Afterall you don't want just anyone trying to pat your Labradoodle named Amoux when your out strolling through the Assiniboine Park on a Sunday afternoon.
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  #50  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 3:33 PM
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to my mind Assiniboine Park isn't really a city park in the grand sense of the word. it is a regional amenity and gets way too much public support. meanwhile fees have to be charged to keep out homeless people, lest it suffers problems like the downtown library experiences. what has become of our society..
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  #51  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 3:33 PM
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Is there a plan for disposal of all the plants and trees?
I believe they're being given to various offices/businesses/etc around the city
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  #52  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 4:55 PM
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i asked the conservatory and they replied that Mmost of it will be turned to compost as the roots are too intertwined to salvage much.
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  #53  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 5:45 PM
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Originally Posted by buzzg View Post
I’ll admit I haven’t paid much attention to the “protests” and complaints about admission for this project... but unless there’s truly something amazing to see here, I have a hard time seeing many people interested to pay to go into this place. If that’s the case, should have been part of the zoo.
Just, before you make these kind of statements, do you take the trouble to review what the plans are and what will be offered.?
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  #54  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 7:17 PM
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"Now they took all the trees, and put 'em in a tree museum; and they charged all the people a dollar and a half just to see 'em"
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  #55  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2018, 3:47 PM
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We have this thing here called winter, when it’s nice to be able to head inside and enjoy plant life on a grand scale. For those opposed, the project received federal and provincial funding. Write your MPs and MLAs!
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  #56  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2018, 10:27 PM
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We have this thing here called winter, when it’s nice to be able to head inside and enjoy plant life on a grand scale. For those opposed, the project received federal and provincial funding. Write your MPs and MLAs!
Investors Group Field and BellMTS Place received government funding but you still have to pay if you want to watch an event in either facility. No need to write your MPs or MLAs because there is a fee to get into the Diversity Gardens.
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  #57  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2018, 4:08 PM
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"Now they took all the trees, and put 'em in a tree museum; and they charged all the people a dollar and a half just to see 'em"
LOL!

What's lost on the "make em pay' crowd is that the Diversity Gardens are being publicly funded and built in a public park replacing something that had always been free and free for a reason!
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  #58  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2018, 5:04 PM
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There is no resemblance whatsoever between the old conservatory and Diversity Gardens. Charging for entrance is no different than any other institution like museums or the zoo.
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  #59  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2018, 5:05 PM
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Originally Posted by DowntownBooster View Post
Investors Group Field and BellMTS Place received government funding but you still have to pay if you want to watch an event in either facility. No need to write your MPs or MLAs because there is a fee to get into the Diversity Gardens.
Totally agree with you.
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  #60  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2018, 9:00 PM
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We will probably wish it will only be $1.50 for an entrance fee. Edmonton charges adults $12 for their version of the Diversity Gardens.
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