HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #3041  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 10:30 PM
Rollerstud98 Rollerstud98 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 810
Probably the guys who refuse to take a pay cut in alberta thing they will go to bc and make better wages! LOL


I had to take a substantial pay cut but was making slightly more than being unemployed. Now 2 years later I'm already back on par with what I was making in 2014 and with the trade I'm in now I'm only at 75%. Also home every night instead of being away for 2 weeks at a time. Nice change.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3042  
Old Posted May 23, 2017, 5:31 PM
geotag277 geotag277 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 5,091
Not sure if this was shared here before, but this report by Brookfield Institue summarized the Canadian tech sector by region:

http://brookfieldinstitute.ca/wp-con...or-2016-V2.pdf

Some highlights that stood out to me:

* Calgary in 2016 still maintains the highest wages of any Canadian city in the tech sector, the only city to break 80k

* Alberta has the lowest % of tech in Scientific R&D, while SK has the highest

* London, ON has about the same # of tech workers as Victoria, BC, a surprise as I am familiar with the Victoria tech scene and there is spill over from being in the Pacific NW tech circle, so that seems very good for London

* Calgary has higher # of individuals employed in tech compared to Ottawa

* Vancouver has a reputation of being a tech center, but it's employment numbers don't seem to be proportionally that much better to other 1 million sized cities exception Edmonton.

* Quebec city has significantly more tech workers than Winnipeg

Interesting report regardless. A good read/skim.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3043  
Old Posted May 23, 2017, 9:26 PM
Denscity Denscity is offline
Suburbs Suck
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Castlegar BC
Posts: 5,629
Haha I was gonna say that's pretty good for Victoria as London would get spillover from KW.
__________________
Daily 1 hour flights from YCG to YVR & YYC on ACX
British Columbia is named after the Columbia River, a 4 minute walk from my house
Exactly halfway between Vancouver and Calgary
castlegar.ca
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3044  
Old Posted May 23, 2017, 10:29 PM
GreaterMontréal's Avatar
GreaterMontréal GreaterMontréal is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 3,639
Quebec is once again the leader in Canada at 6.4%. Montréal at 1.7%, premier de classe.
__________________
There's only so much fortune a man needs and the rest is just for showing off.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3045  
Old Posted May 23, 2017, 10:50 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is offline
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 19,376
There is remarkably little variation in that list of cities. Kitchener-Waterloo is well-known as a tech hub and is only marginally higher than Halifax. Kitchener-Waterloo only really stands out compared to other smaller cities in Ontario and on the Prairies.

The list of higher-than-average tech worker concentration is close to being a list of regionally important cities in Canada, which isn't surprising I guess. The pessimistic view to take of the situation is that no Canadian city has really taken off as a city with a large cluster of major tech companies.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3046  
Old Posted May 23, 2017, 11:15 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Lévis, QC
Posts: 18,953
Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
The pessimistic view to take of the situation is that no Canadian city has really taken off as a city with a large cluster of major tech companies.
Venture capital isn't too accessible in Canada, so it's normal that tech sectors will be underdeveloped. Investors seem to prefer more conservative stuff - resources, real estate... all low-tech, of course.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3047  
Old Posted May 23, 2017, 11:21 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is offline
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 19,376
Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Venture capital isn't too accessible in Canada, so it's normal that tech sectors will be underdeveloped. Investors seem to prefer more conservative stuff - resources, real estate... all low-tech, of course.
This topic came up a little while ago. There's a lot of brain drain to the US (~80% of the Computer Science M.Sc. and Ph.D. graduates I know moved south of the border) and there's already a large cluster of major tech companies in the Bay Area, and an older generation that got rich from startups and now provides VC funding. Were it not for personal ties here in Vancouver I'd have moved to San Francisco years ago.

I've worked at a few different tech companies of different sizes. Nearly all were either funded by American investors or had corporate ties to the US (e.g. they started out as a small startup here and got bought out by a large American company).

Here in Vancouver, and presumably around Canada, there's a lower tier of local software companies or companies that hire programmers but are behind the times and pay poorly. Until a few years ago, here in Vancouver, those were almost all of the locally-available tech jobs. Today, companies like Amazon are much more prominent. It is generally much better to work for a branch office of an American company or work remotely than to work at a smaller, older company, or a non-software-focused company in finance, telecom, aerospace, and the like.

If you work remotely for a Bay Area company you can sometimes do extremely well, because you can negotiate compensation just a bit lower than the Bay Area norm but you will have living expenses that are a tiny fraction of what people pay in San Francisco or San Jose. The average SF one-bedroom apartment is around $4,500 a month Canadian. Here in Vancouver we of course have absurd housing prices but rents aren't too bad.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3048  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 2:44 AM
1overcosc's Avatar
1overcosc 1overcosc is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Kingston, Ontario
Posts: 9,180
^ I find from experience that those who move to the Bay Area tend to move back within a few years. Living in San Fran is not all it's cracked up to be... very expensive cost of living, shitty commutes, and the companies expect you to work yourself to death.

The brain drain seems to be more of a concern with folks who move to places like Houston. Those that move there tend to actually stay there.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3049  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 2:45 AM
1overcosc's Avatar
1overcosc 1overcosc is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Kingston, Ontario
Posts: 9,180
Lack of VC and the extremely conservative nature of Canadian investors makes it very hard for Canadians to make tech startups. Yet our significant competitive advantage over the US in taxes and the labour market means many American tech companies are investing huge bucks to open Canadian offices.

Tech is growing in Canada, but not as our own thing, rather as an American branch plant, like everything else.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3050  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 4:15 AM
ssiguy ssiguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: White Rock BC
Posts: 5,662
I think one thing that should concern us all is how poorly Canada does compared to it's OECD contemporaries.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3051  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 4:24 AM
jmt18325's Avatar
jmt18325 jmt18325 is offline
Heart of the Continent
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 6,278
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
I think one thing that should concern us all is how poorly Canada does compared to it's OECD contemporaries.
Canada doesn't actually do all that poorly in any category, other than perhaps productivity.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3052  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 4:57 AM
OutOfTowner OutOfTowner is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: MTL
Posts: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmt18325 View Post
Canada doesn't actually do all that poorly in any category, other than perhaps productivity.
We're number 20! We're number 20!

The happy chant of the Canadian (less than) mediocrity apologists.

We no longer care if we lead the world in anything - so long as we're 'diverse', which has become our identity, in lieu of having any discernible identity..

We do sort of good in a few things, which is good enough for most Canadians.

Last edited by OutOfTowner; May 24, 2017 at 5:12 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3053  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 5:04 AM
jmt18325's Avatar
jmt18325 jmt18325 is offline
Heart of the Continent
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 6,278
Quote:
Originally Posted by OutOfTowner View Post
We're number 20! We're number 20!

The happy chant of the Canadian (less than) mediocrity apologists.

Doesn't matter though, we're so diverse!
Canada being described as less than mediocre is completely out of touch. Productivity is important, but it's certainly not the only measure. Other economic indicators are all above midpack. Productivity itself will always be somewhat hobbled by the simple logistics of such a large and sparsely populated country.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3054  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 5:14 AM
theman23's Avatar
theman23 theman23 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Saskatoon
Posts: 2,103
Quote:
Originally Posted by khabibulin View Post
It's because most doctors charge an obscene fee to do nothing other than sign a piece of paper after a 30 second consultation. And there is no insurance coverage for that, it is all out of pocket from the person requesting the note. That has been my experience anyway.

I am also a federal government employee, with 29 years of service and have built up accumulated sick leave of over 250 days.
When I was still doing clinic work in Ontario, I used to send an invoice with the patient to the employer to bill for the visit since technically any third party request for a medical service is not an insured service. Any guess to how many times I was paid?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3055  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 5:59 AM
OutOfTowner OutOfTowner is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: MTL
Posts: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmt18325 View Post
Canada being described as less than mediocre is completely out of touch. Productivity is important, but it's certainly not the only measure. Other economic indicators are all above midpack. Productivity itself will always be somewhat hobbled by the simple logistics of such a large and sparsely populated country.
I am wrong, you are absolutely correct.

We are somewhat above some economic indicators, notwithstanding other large and sparsely populated countries i.e.: Norway, Sweden, Finland and other less-than-large yet sparsely populated countries i.e.: Denmark, Netherlands and yet other large-not-sparsely populated countries such as, I dunno, GERMANY?

But hey, whatever floats your boat, flag guy.

Never trust flag guys, they have an agenda.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3056  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 12:30 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Lévis, QC
Posts: 18,953
Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
This topic came up a little while ago. There's a lot of brain drain to the US (~80% of the Computer Science M.Sc. and Ph.D. graduates I know moved south of the border) and there's already a large cluster of major tech companies in the Bay Area, and an older generation that got rich from startups and now provides VC funding. Were it not for personal ties here in Vancouver I'd have moved to San Francisco years ago.
I'm pretty sure I pointed it out already, but I have two close friends who have been toiling at starting a very high tech operation for a couple years already; they chose Sherbrooke due to established contacts and connections (including access to the university's facilities) but after a year of trying to get funding I was told by them that in retrospect they think they should've moved the embryo to Boston at a much earlier stage. Turns out, access to VC really is that critical that it's apparently worth a bunch of other logistical sacrifices. Even now, they're not out of the woods yet. A large chunk of the funding they managed to get so far was from various government sources; another source was myself as a fellow physicist of some means.

At least there are levels of govt in Canada that are wise enough to recognize helping startups is something that can pay off, if we wanted to find a silver lining here.

Personally, I'd like to see incentive programs... say, gains on recognized venture capital profits being less taxed, and losses on failed venture capital attempts counting for more in writeoffs, stuff like that.

The U.S. had programs like that for decades to encourage digging for oil, if I recall correctly. (First half of the 20th century.) Makes a lot of sense when you want to encourage investors to gamble their money in a particular field that's deemed society-building or strategic, over other possible fields of investment.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3057  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 1:51 PM
jmt18325's Avatar
jmt18325 jmt18325 is offline
Heart of the Continent
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 6,278
Quote:
Originally Posted by OutOfTowner View Post
I am wrong, you are absolutely correct.
Good of you admit that
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3058  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 4:48 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is offline
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 19,376
The conservative nature of Canadian business probably has something to do with the low productivity. We have so many crappy monopolies (e.g. cell phone companies) that make tons of money but provide little value. On the flip side, it's hard to grow new, higher productivity businesses because of a lack of funding and the opportunity cost of participating in monopoly exploitation.

Productivity is probably the single most efficient economic metric. It's implicitly a measure of total output and it's what separates us from the Stone Age; we accomplish more with a given amount of human labour. Canada's standard of living will invariably fall behind that of other countries in the long run if they experience more growth in productivity.

"We're great, except for productivity" is like that DC mayor or whoever who said that, aside from all the murders, his city was actually a great place to live.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3059  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 4:57 PM
jmt18325's Avatar
jmt18325 jmt18325 is offline
Heart of the Continent
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 6,278
We haven't fallen behind in productivity - in fact we've gotten more productive. It's just that for a few years, we didn't grow our productivity as fast as the OECD average. High oil may have a lot to do with that.

Our per capita GDP is in the top 15 in the world. I think that's also a good measure.

Edit: our productivity is also in the top 15.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3060  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 5:02 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is offline
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 19,376
Productivity is just the GDP divided by hours worked or similar. GDP per capita doesn't account for the fact that people work more in some places than others; it seems strictly worse to me as an economic indicator.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:57 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.