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  #241  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2015, 5:34 PM
enjoy*responsibly enjoy*responsibly is offline
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So I guess a contract has actually been signed.. for 5 ships.. full production strting in September.. I'm sure we will be hearing more details in the coming days
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  #242  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2015, 4:14 AM
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Dwils01 Dwils01 is offline
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1,500 tonnes of steel plate for the construction of these ships will be coming from Sault Ste. Marie. Nice to see that the materials to build these ships will be coming from Canada.

http://www.sootoday.com/content/news...ls.asp?c=85630
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  #243  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2015, 5:38 PM
terrynorthend terrynorthend is offline
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Aerial drone footage of Irving's facilities... courtesy Irving Shipbuilding and CBC
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  #244  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2015, 1:53 PM
enjoy*responsibly enjoy*responsibly is offline
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Originally Posted by Dwils01 View Post
1,500 tonnes of steel plate for the construction of these ships will be coming from Sault Ste. Marie. Nice to see that the materials to build these ships will be coming from Canada.

http://www.sootoday.com/content/news...ls.asp?c=85630
So steel will come from there and be cut/processed at the facility on Windmill?
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  #245  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2015, 8:09 PM
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So steel will come from there and be cut/processed at the facility on Windmill?
yep, thats the plan.
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  #246  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2016, 8:37 PM
Colin May Colin May is offline
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Strong competition for Irving : http://montrealgazette.com/business/...-a-rising-tide

" Signed last fall and approved by the new Liberal government in January, the so-called Resolve project revolves around the Davie-paid conversion of a fuel tanker it bought for $20 million in Europe into a $450-million sea oiler replenishment ship for the RCN.

If and when it is delivered on schedule by the end of 2017, Davie and OMERS-owned project partner V. Ships, the world’s largest ship management company with an office in downtown Montreal, will also provide a 40-man crew to operate the non-combat vessel. "

OMERS is the pension fund for Ontario municipal employees and this is V Group :
http://www.vships.com/about-us.aspx
OMERS has 2 members on the board as well as the former CEO of OMERS.

Later in the article : " Financed by a Canadian fund he refused to identify, saying only that it specializes in infrastructure and asset lending, Vicefield said the Resolve project is helping Davie pump millions of dollars into the Quebec economy through jobs and purchases from nearly 600 suppliers, 113 of them in Montreal. "
Any bets the fund is OMERS or the Caisse or CPPIB ?

And then this : " Davie’s aggressiveness and success are driving its two main Canadian rivals — Halifax’s Irving and Vancouver’s Seaspan — to distraction.
Despite being contracted to build up to 40 vessels worth $38 billion over 30 years, the two yards are feeling the heat from public criticism of cost overruns and construction delays in the much-maligned federal ship procurement program. .......Davie has also hired away some top talent from Irving, sparking a war of words and some lawsuits.

However Irving followed Davie’s lead in May, when it made an unsolicited bid to build a $300-million ship within a year that would be specifically designed to aid in a humanitarian crisis or with refugee relief.

“I think they’re running scared,” said Davie’s chief operational officer, Laurie LeRue.

A 37-year shipbuilding industry veteran who was director of naval refits at Irving’s Halifax shipyard when he left three years ago to join Davie, LeRue said the Lévis yard has the wind in its sails thanks to the energy and expertise of its British owners. "
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  #247  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2016, 1:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Colin May View Post
Strong competition for Irving : http://montrealgazette.com/business/...-a-rising-tide

" Signed last fall and approved by the new Liberal government in January, the so-called Resolve project revolves around the Davie-paid conversion of a fuel tanker it bought for $20 million in Europe into a $450-million sea oiler replenishment ship for the RCN.

If and when it is delivered on schedule by the end of 2017, Davie and OMERS-owned project partner V. Ships, the world’s largest ship management company with an office in downtown Montreal, will also provide a 40-man crew to operate the non-combat vessel. "

OMERS is the pension fund for Ontario municipal employees and this is V Group :
http://www.vships.com/about-us.aspx
OMERS has 2 members on the board as well as the former CEO of OMERS.

Later in the article : " Financed by a Canadian fund he refused to identify, saying only that it specializes in infrastructure and asset lending, Vicefield said the Resolve project is helping Davie pump millions of dollars into the Quebec economy through jobs and purchases from nearly 600 suppliers, 113 of them in Montreal. "
Any bets the fund is OMERS or the Caisse or CPPIB ?

And then this : " Davie’s aggressiveness and success are driving its two main Canadian rivals — Halifax’s Irving and Vancouver’s Seaspan — to distraction.
Despite being contracted to build up to 40 vessels worth $38 billion over 30 years, the two yards are feeling the heat from public criticism of cost overruns and construction delays in the much-maligned federal ship procurement program. .......Davie has also hired away some top talent from Irving, sparking a war of words and some lawsuits.

However Irving followed Davie’s lead in May, when it made an unsolicited bid to build a $300-million ship within a year that would be specifically designed to aid in a humanitarian crisis or with refugee relief.

“I think they’re running scared,” said Davie’s chief operational officer, Laurie LeRue.

A 37-year shipbuilding industry veteran who was director of naval refits at Irving’s Halifax shipyard when he left three years ago to join Davie, LeRue said the Lévis yard has the wind in its sails thanks to the energy and expertise of its British owners. "
project resolve is actually a container ship conversion. Not that old used container-ships are really really cheap right now, since the freight rates for containers are so depressed. no one wants to run small boats, unless they need to.

container ships are basically open space on the inside. Its pretty easy to drop in tanks, and warehouse space into the holds. and have a very capable ship.

Davie is aggressively trying to generate business. ISI seems happy to lean back and suck on government contracts. The sale of the Nova dock effectively put them out of the repair business for any sizeable ship, though smaller vessels can be handled in shelburne.
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  #248  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2016, 4:10 PM
Colin May Colin May is offline
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project resolve is actually a container ship conversion. Not that old used container-ships are really really cheap right now, since the freight rates for containers are so depressed. no one wants to run small boats, unless they need to.

container ships are basically open space on the inside. Its pretty easy to drop in tanks, and warehouse space into the holds. and have a very capable ship.

Davie is aggressively trying to generate business. ISI seems happy to lean back and suck on government contracts. The sale of the Nova dock effectively put them out of the repair business for any sizeable ship, though smaller vessels can be handled in shelburne.
In the USA the MSC (Military Sealift Command) often converted foreign flag container/ro-ro ships to support vessels, they liked Maersk and Wilhelmsen ships. Too bad Canada didn't do the same as the USA and UK and use civilian crews for supply and support vessels.
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  #249  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 3:14 AM
pblaauw pblaauw is offline
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Originally Posted by Colin May View Post
In the USA the MSC (Military Sealift Command) often converted foreign flag container/ro-ro ships to support vessels, they liked Maersk and Wilhelmsen ships. Too bad Canada didn't do the same as the USA and UK and use civilian crews for supply and support vessels.
This is why contracting private vessels to move military equipment is a bad idea.
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  #250  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 12:16 PM
Colin May Colin May is offline
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This is why contracting private vessels to move military equipment is a bad idea.
Buht if Canada had the equivalent of this there would be no problem : http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/our-orga...leet-auxiliary
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  #251  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 1:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Colin May View Post
In the USA the MSC (Military Sealift Command) often converted foreign flag container/ro-ro ships to support vessels, they liked Maersk and Wilhelmsen ships. Too bad Canada didn't do the same as the USA and UK and use civilian crews for supply and support vessels.
Nope. MSC actually builds ships, Flags them in the US and requires them to be operated with US Crew. They then Charter them to Shipping companies, rather then leaving them sitting at the dock in case they need them.

this is why the yarmouth ferry runs with an American crew. The Maersk Alabama of Captain Philips fame,was also a MSC Ship.
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  #252  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 1:44 PM
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Buht if Canada had the equivalent of this there would be no problem : http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/our-orga...leet-auxiliary
the RFA doesn't have the capability to reposition a significant land based force. they can land units, but moving a large force to the middle east is outside their ability. NATO actually chartered a RO-RO vessel for bring equipment to and from Afghanistan.
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  #253  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 4:22 PM
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Nope. MSC actually builds ships, Flags them in the US and requires them to be operated with US Crew. They then Charter them to Shipping companies, rather then leaving them sitting at the dock in case they need them.

this is why the yarmouth ferry runs with an American crew. The Maersk Alabama of Captain Philips fame,was also a MSC Ship.
I said often. I know in the past they converted many merchant vessels by keeping the stern and the bow and inserting a new section. They really liked Roro/container ships such as the ACL and Wilhemsen ships because the roro ramp capability was 200 tons. The ACL & Wilhelmsen ships were designed to meet the requirements if requisitioned by the military and the Atlantic Conveyor is a prime example of having the capability to take take and helicopters on board. The RO/RO cargo area was like entering a massive high warehouse. I used to see all manner of heavy/large equipment on the ACL ships at Halterm.
http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2012/0...r-falklands30/
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  #254  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2016, 1:06 PM
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I said often. I know in the past they converted many merchant vessels by keeping the stern and the bow and inserting a new section. They really liked Roro/container ships such as the ACL and Wilhemsen ships because the roro ramp capability was 200 tons. The ACL & Wilhelmsen ships were designed to meet the requirements if requisitioned by the military and the Atlantic Conveyor is a prime example of having the capability to take take and helicopters on board. The RO/RO cargo area was like entering a massive high warehouse. I used to see all manner of heavy/large equipment on the ACL ships at Halterm.
http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2012/0...r-falklands30/
the Atlantic Conveyor of Falklands fame was a commercial ship, UK flagged and pressed into service under the RFA. same as the US MSC does.

the current ones bring over all sorts of cargo. Liberherr Heavy equipment, Farm tractors, Airplane wings and Fuselages, all come over on ACL.

Inside Atlantic Conveyor:
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  #255  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2017, 7:14 PM
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I went to the Irving Shipbuilding open house. It is a very impressive facility, I was also very impressed by the presentation they had for their guests. The building is massive and state of the art.

While there I noticed a tower crane being assembled to help with the fitting out of the ship modules that are rolled out to the yard.
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  #256  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2017, 7:17 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by kph06 View Post
I went to the Irving Shipbuilding open house. It is a very impressive facility, I was also very impressed by the presentation they had for their guests. The building is massive and state of the art.

While there I noticed a tower crane being assembled to help with the fitting out of the ship modules that are rolled out to the yard.
Sounds pretty neat!

I must pay better attention to what's going on around here - would have liked to see it from the inside.
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  #257  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2017, 7:36 PM
terrynorthend terrynorthend is offline
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Sounds pretty neat!

I must pay better attention to what's going on around here - would have liked to see it from the inside.
Lol. I received a glossy magazine in the mail a couple weeks ago from Halifax Shipyard. I set it down, thinking, I'll take a look at that later tonight. Forgot all about it.

Just looked at it. Inside was an invitation to the Open House. D'oh!
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  #258  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2017, 9:10 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Lol. I received a glossy magazine in the mail a couple weeks ago from Halifax Shipyard. I set it down, thinking, I'll take a look at that later tonight. Forgot all about it.

Just looked at it. Inside was an invitation to the Open House. D'oh!
Dang it! I got that brochure and did the same thing - tossed it aside to look at when I got a chance...

Sigh...
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  #259  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2017, 7:45 PM
FuzzyWuz FuzzyWuz is offline
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I see half a ship sitting in the yard at Irving. Wish I was quick enough to take a photo but I was on the bus.
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