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  #181  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2017, 9:38 PM
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A cool illustration of the green loop:


[Portland Monthly]
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  #182  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 6:29 AM
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I feel like less people are biking in Portland compared to how much the population has increased, Downtown especially seems like far less are biking than before. It makes me wonder if things like Uber and Lyft are having any impact on cyclist and transit rider numbers.
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  #183  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by urbanlife View Post
I feel like less people are biking in Portland compared to how much the population has increased, Downtown especially seems like far less are biking than before. It makes me wonder if things like Uber and Lyft are having any impact on cyclist and transit rider numbers.
The paradox is that as traffic gets worse, so do biking conditions. One of the most familiar complaints I hear in Portland comes from drivers who detest bicyclists. It's almost as if every bit of pavement in this city is now being contested by different tribes. Barring major improvements in biking infrastructure, I don't see how the situation gets better. As a non-car owning bicyclist living in central Portland, I increasingly avoid downtown. The Pearl, in particular, feels like a minefield of streetcar tracks, opening car doors, and impatient drivers.
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  #184  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 5:29 PM
innovativethinking innovativethinking is offline
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Originally Posted by urbanlife View Post
I feel like less people are biking in Portland compared to how much the population has increased, Downtown especially seems like far less are biking than before. It makes me wonder if things like Uber and Lyft are having any impact on cyclist and transit rider numbers.
Thank god

It's dangerous for them anyways
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  #185  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 9:41 PM
ebetsure ebetsure is offline
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Originally Posted by innovativethinking View Post
Thank god

It's dangerous for them anyways
Well humans are biologically mortal and air pollution is dangerous for everyone, so if people want to bike and accept whatever dangers, more power to them. Cyclists probably have higher life-expectancy compared with non-cyclists overall, both because it selects for younger, more physically active types, and because the activity improves health (if you avoid getting in a bad crash).

It was an unusually wet, cold, and snowy winter, which probably decreased the number of bikers on the roads.

But soleri's comment about increasing hazards, and in particular the streetcar tracks, rings true to me. Grade separation for vehicles that require rails, please. This should be common sense. I am a huge proponent of mass-transit, light-rail, elevated railways, dedicated bike paths, bike lanes, subways, etc. But it needs to be done well, which for trains means minimizing the number of at-grade crossings. For at-grade crossings 1) The train needs to slow down dramatically. 2) Crossing traffic needs to stop ~20 seconds in advance of the train and ~10 seconds after the train has passed. 3) Pedestrians and bikes also need to wait. 4) The crossing barriers and alarms need to be maintained. In other words, it's a huge mess.
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  #186  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 11:39 PM
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Originally Posted by urbanlife View Post
I feel like less people are biking in Portland compared to how much the population has increased, Downtown especially seems like far less are biking than before. It makes me wonder if things like Uber and Lyft are having any impact on cyclist and transit rider numbers.
I'm sure gentrification also has a role in that. I know quite a few people who have purchased cars over the past couple of years as they have had to move out to neighborhoods east of 205, where biking is unpleasant at best.

Also the city has really lagged at providing real, meaningful bike infrastructure. Sure they've set up a greenway here and there, a couple of improved crossings, but they really need more routes that are separated from traffic and out of the door zone.

I personally always found the pearl to be super easy to navigate. It's not that hard to avoid the streetcar tracks, and the speed limits are slow enough and the roads narrow enough that it has never felt dangerous to me in the slightest. Most of my dicey encounters have happened near the center of downtown where the roads have more lanes. Especially broadway. The number of times I was almost taken out by an aggressive cab drive on that road.... geesh.
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  #187  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2017, 7:08 AM
zilfondel zilfondel is offline
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I've been cycling to commute for work and so on since I moved to Portland almost 15 years ago. My observation is that there is still quite a bit of people biking, although I don't work in downtown anymore. However, aside from South Waterfront and the new bridge, there really is barely any new infrastructure that has been built. And yes, there is a HELL of a lot more traffic, so if your route requires you to bike in traffic, its borderline suicidal. Compared to 10 years ago, when you could take the lane on 11th or 12th as there were far fewer cars, today you could end up holding back 100 or 200 vehicles that all end up blowing by you... likely causing a lot of cyclists to rethink their sanity.

To be blunt, this city needs to get real about building real bike infrastructure. They've been experimenting for 2 generations on different configurations of bike lanes and cycle tracks. Apparently the city bureaus and city council have so politicized every goddamn inch of the streets that they have to spend 10 years on a design and community outreach process before abandoning any planned projects, like they just did with the proposed Foster streetscape, the Burnside couplet... goes on and on. Its been extremely aggravating to watch the absolute glacial pace of infrastructure improvements, particularly to bikes. Seems like there aren't any more projects on the horizon either, just like with Trimet cancelling the SE division/powell corridor.

We'll probably just turn into another Seattle with slightly less worse traffic.
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  #188  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2017, 12:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zilfondel View Post
I've been cycling to commute for work and so on since I moved to Portland almost 15 years ago. My observation is that there is still quite a bit of people biking, although I don't work in downtown anymore. However, aside from South Waterfront and the new bridge, there really is barely any new infrastructure that has been built. And yes, there is a HELL of a lot more traffic, so if your route requires you to bike in traffic, its borderline suicidal. Compared to 10 years ago, when you could take the lane on 11th or 12th as there were far fewer cars, today you could end up holding back 100 or 200 vehicles that all end up blowing by you... likely causing a lot of cyclists to rethink their sanity.

To be blunt, this city needs to get real about building real bike infrastructure. They've been experimenting for 2 generations on different configurations of bike lanes and cycle tracks. Apparently the city bureaus and city council have so politicized every goddamn inch of the streets that they have to spend 10 years on a design and community outreach process before abandoning any planned projects, like they just did with the proposed Foster streetscape, the Burnside couplet... goes on and on. Its been extremely aggravating to watch the absolute glacial pace of infrastructure improvements, particularly to bikes. Seems like there aren't any more projects on the horizon either, just like with Trimet cancelling the SE division/powell corridor.

We'll probably just turn into another Seattle with slightly less worse traffic.
Yep. You just summarized one of the main reasons I left Portland. I grew up there and saw the perception of bike culture serve as a replacement for actual physical infrastructure. Remember when Portland was looked at as #1 a decade ago by you name it. It's still a great place, but a robust bike culture only goes so far when there are virtually no PBLs.
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  #189  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2017, 12:36 AM
maccoinnich maccoinnich is offline
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Portland actually has a lot of funded projects for high quality bike infrastructure in downtown:
  • Flanders Bridge over I-405
  • Sullivan's Crossing over I-84
  • Central City Multimodal Project ($8 million allocated, projects TBD)
  • West Burnside & 18th / 19th protected intersection
  • SW Bond, from the Tilikum Crossing to River Parkway, with a protected bike lane
  • Extension of NW 20th under Highway 30, including protected bike lanes
  • Repaving of Naito/Front north of NW 9th, which will include new (painted) bike lanes

It's frustrating how long how long it's taking for some of these to get off the ground, but when they do they'll make a big difference.

Looking further ahead, the new SDC list for the next 10 years, published today, also includes these projects as SDC eligible:
  • Willamette Greenway Trail, $2,500,000: Provide two paths in order to separate bicyclists from pedestrians in remaining gaps of South Waterfront's Willamette Greenway trail.
  • NW Naito/Front Corridor Improvements (9th - 21st), $3,608,417: Construct multimodal safety and access improvements including sidewalk infill, protected bike lanes, signal improvements, and lane modifications.
  • Bond Ave Extension, Phase 2, $16,000,000: Extend SW Bond one-way northbound from SW Whitaker to Porter, extend Portland Streetcar service north of the Tram, and convert Moody to one-way southbound operation to form a couplet
  • I-405 South Portland Crossing Improvements, $5,000,000: Improve opportunities for people walking and bicycling to cross I-405 on Harbor Dr, Naito Pkwy, 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th, and Broadway.
  • SW Broadway Bikeway and Streetscape Improvements, $1,500,000: Enhances the existing protected bikeway and sidewalks on SW Broadway adjacent to Portland State University. Includes the construction of a raised bikeway, sidewalk amenities, green street features, ADA improvements, pedestrian islands, curb bulb-outs, and a full signal at Harrison.
  • NE Multnomah Protected Bikeway, $2,000,000: Construct permanent improvements to the NE Multnomah St protected bikeway, including pedestrian islands and transit islands.
  • Broadway/ Weidler Corridor Improvements, Phase 1, $9,000,000: Enhance existing bike lanes and improve pedestrian/bicycle crossings. Add traffic signals, improve signal timing, improve transit stops, and construct streetscape improvements.
  • Central City Multimodal Improvements, Phase 2, $20,000,000: Construct high-priority bikeways, pedestrian improvements, and transit priority treatments in the Central City.
  • Inner Hawthorne Multimodal Corridor Improvements, $2,000,000: Construct an eastbound protected bikeway with transit islands to improve pedestrian and bicycle safety and comfort as well as transit operational efficiency. Explore feasibility of eastbound bus only lane as part of project design.
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  #190  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2017, 3:05 AM
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Since bike riders are moving further out, build a light rail line parallel with a existing one. Have them close enough to bike from in the center between the lines, then build buildings that are for bikes there in between. At the light rail stops have big areas to park your bike.

the Powell or division train if it gets built and the burnside max would be perfect. Or have a subway that can fit as many people as two short light rail train. I like the subway more. That's my idea

Edit: crap I haven't been to Portland for a while, I forgot how far those two streets are from each other. Then maybe put the bike buildings( circular buildings with spiral bike paths in the middle) downtown

Last edited by dabom; Apr 22, 2017 at 3:31 AM.
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  #191  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2017, 1:21 PM
hat hat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maccoinnich View Post
Portland actually has a lot of funded projects for high quality bike infrastructure in downtown:
  • Flanders Bridge over I-405
  • Sullivan's Crossing over I-84
  • Central City Multimodal Project ($8 million allocated, projects TBD)
  • West Burnside & 18th / 19th protected intersection
  • SW Bond, from the Tilikum Crossing to River Parkway, with a protected bike lane
  • Extension of NW 20th under Highway 30, including protected bike lanes
  • Repaving of Naito/Front north of NW 9th, which will include new (painted) bike lanes

It's frustrating how long how long it's taking for some of these to get off the ground, but when they do they'll make a big difference.

Looking further ahead, the new SDC list for the next 10 years, published today, also includes these projects as SDC eligible:
  • Willamette Greenway Trail, $2,500,000: Provide two paths in order to separate bicyclists from pedestrians in remaining gaps of South Waterfront's Willamette Greenway trail.
  • NW Naito/Front Corridor Improvements (9th - 21st), $3,608,417: Construct multimodal safety and access improvements including sidewalk infill, protected bike lanes, signal improvements, and lane modifications.
  • Bond Ave Extension, Phase 2, $16,000,000: Extend SW Bond one-way northbound from SW Whitaker to Porter, extend Portland Streetcar service north of the Tram, and convert Moody to one-way southbound operation to form a couplet
  • I-405 South Portland Crossing Improvements, $5,000,000: Improve opportunities for people walking and bicycling to cross I-405 on Harbor Dr, Naito Pkwy, 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th, and Broadway.
  • SW Broadway Bikeway and Streetscape Improvements, $1,500,000: Enhances the existing protected bikeway and sidewalks on SW Broadway adjacent to Portland State University. Includes the construction of a raised bikeway, sidewalk amenities, green street features, ADA improvements, pedestrian islands, curb bulb-outs, and a full signal at Harrison.
  • NE Multnomah Protected Bikeway, $2,000,000: Construct permanent improvements to the NE Multnomah St protected bikeway, including pedestrian islands and transit islands.
  • Broadway/ Weidler Corridor Improvements, Phase 1, $9,000,000: Enhance existing bike lanes and improve pedestrian/bicycle crossings. Add traffic signals, improve signal timing, improve transit stops, and construct streetscape improvements.
  • Central City Multimodal Improvements, Phase 2, $20,000,000: Construct high-priority bikeways, pedestrian improvements, and transit priority treatments in the Central City.
  • Inner Hawthorne Multimodal Corridor Improvements, $2,000,000: Construct an eastbound protected bikeway with transit islands to improve pedestrian and bicycle safety and comfort as well as transit operational efficiency. Explore feasibility of eastbound bus only lane as part of project design.
This is an impressive list. I can't wait to ride the The Broadway/Weidler PBL and Central City PBLs in particular (I thought the NE 7th bridge was in design phase? Not funded?). I agree with many of PBOTs initiatives and projects, and find them one of the most promising DOTs I have communicated with (in the US). I understand also their hands are often tied by political forces I do not understand.

However, I find their oft-used "lack of funds" reasoning somewhat deceitful. I observe a similar functional effect, with paint and sometimes a few pots. For example, the Jay St PBL in Brooklyn, and the NE Multnomah PBL in Portland. Add paint and pots: Instant PBL. If PBOT asked for paint donations to create a PBL on SW Broadway, it would be done in a week. There's no lack of advocates in Pland. A very nice can of paint and removal of one of the 3! car lanes would have allowed families to ride through downtown a decade ago. All Pland needs is leadership.
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