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  #81  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2009, 4:16 PM
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"And what is considered the historical section now were just thought of as OLD."

Any wonder why so much of our history was lost in Central/Downtown Phoenix, probably beginning right at the time this guy is reminiscing about.
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  #82  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2009, 4:23 PM
HX_Guy HX_Guy is offline
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Kind of makes sense if you think about it though. It's like us thinking of houses built in the 70s and 80s...would you really save them? They are just...old. But in 50-60 years from now, people may think what nice historic houses they are.
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  #83  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2009, 4:43 PM
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I think the big difference, though, is that these "old" houses he was talking about were definitely pre-war, which 100% means they were lacking A/C. When A/C became more widespread and a thought of as a necessity, those beautiful houses downtown were really from another (seeminly useless) time period. Imagine the costs to renovate and install an A/C system into an "old" house.
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  #84  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 11:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HX_Guy View Post
Kind of makes sense if you think about it though. It's like us thinking of houses built in the 70s and 80s...would you really save them? They are just...old. But in 50-60 years from now, people may think what nice historic houses they are.
Comparing period revivals to hack and tract ranch houses is silly.
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  #85  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 11:22 PM
Vicelord John Vicelord John is offline
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hmmmm 2 foot thick brick and mortar wall or 2x4 and styrofoam wall? I'd have to say the houses they are building now, unless architecturarly significant or high dollar construction, will be worthless in 60 years.
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  #86  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2009, 6:46 PM
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Interesting reminisces, but 2 corrections for what they're worth:
It's Stevie Nicks (from Fleetwood Mac), and her father was Jess Nicks.
He opened/owned(?)/ran the 2 Compton Terrace amphitheatres in the Valley, named after a pioneering local radio DJ. The first one was at Legend City, by SRP. When LC closed, a new amph. opened on the Gila River Res. You can still see the stage and some Eucalyptus trees just west of I-10.
Stevie's mother also owned an antique shop in downtown Scottsdale and then later in Payson. Also, Stevie was born at Good Samaritan Hosp. on McDowell in Phx in 1948, and they lived right off 16th St N of McDowell at the time.
PS - other spelling corrections: McDonald's, and Marty Robbins.
Also, the Bayless market replica museum mentioned was one of the bldgs near the NWC of Central/Indian School recently torn down.
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Last edited by NIXPHX77; Dec 27, 2009 at 7:01 PM.
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  #87  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2010, 7:48 AM
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Please come join us for the monthly Phx Historic Neighborhoods Coalition meeting at 7 pm at the Phx Elem. School Dist. #1 Boardroom, which is reached via the parking lot south of Palm Lane and east of 7th street. We meet on the third Thursday of each month. Thanks.

http://phxhistoric.wordpress.com
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Stonewall, maybe. But Pumpkinville?!?
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  #88  
Old Posted May 30, 2010, 10:04 PM
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2010 enDangered Dozen historic Phx bldgs

Check out the Phoenix Historic Neighborhoods Coalition's 2010 list
of the most "enDangered Dozen" historic places in the city of Phx:

http://pitch.pe/66942
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  #89  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2010, 6:36 AM
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This probably should go here:

Anyone have any info on the status of the Log Cabin Motel on E VB?

i am concerned cuz it looks closed and there is a large backhoe parked on site.

i think it would be a shame to lose this classic roadside kitschy gem.
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  #90  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2010, 4:31 PM
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/\ NIXPHX, can I get a copy of the self-guided driving tour guide that is mentioned on the Phoenix Historic Neighborhoods Coalition website? It says to ask for one.
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  #91  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2010, 5:29 PM
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HISTORIC FACADE RENOVATION AND REHABILITATION

Tucson is doing a great thing in renovating some of their historic structures' facades. Many times older buildings were given hideous 1950s-1980s renovations. Bringing back the original facade would do wonders to the streetscape and the look and feel of downtown Phoenix and the surroundings. We bitch and complain about the lack of historic building stock in Phoenix, or the lack of nice historic buildings to look at, but there are many out there hiding behind utter garbage facades. If the city could somehow provide grants and incentives to building owners to rehabilitate their historic structures, it would benefit everyone. Check these out that I know of:

Heard Building and what is now the Quiznos at Central/Adams:

courtesy of: http://www.arizonahistoricalimages.o...r.jsp?R=445900

What it looks like now (with Thai Elephant, Yasda Bento, Coney Island place, Quiznos, Roma Cafe):



On the side of the quiznos at the top, you can still see that there is brick there (hard to tell in this pic).

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=3...5.92,,0,-11.28

Imagine this block of contiguous street-fronting great buildings, right on the light rail line, brought back to their original glory. Sure, the ornateness and parapets are probably gone and they'd have to be rebuilt, but it could be done, and I'm sure the original brick is underneath. It would be a point of pride, rather than an ugly afterthought. The Heard Building is OK in its altered state, but not as good as it was.


Majerle's and the couple of clubs along Washington:

courtesy of: http://www.arizonahistoricalimages.o...r.jsp?R=450899

What it looks like now (slightly old pic):


http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=3...19.68,,0,-0.34

This one isn't too bad, however, Majerles could bring back the brick and rebuild the triangular parapet. It's the oldest remaining commercial building in Phoenix (late 1800s). Also, what was "Burn" is awful, you can kind of tell what it was at the far left of the historic picture (the Ezra W. Thayer Hardware building). The nice wooden railings for these buildings are gone forever, but the brick buildings themselves should be restored. Again, it would be a great looking street.

The Subway and Focaccia Fiorentina corner at Central/Monroe:
(look at the bottom left corner):

Courtesy of: http://www.arizonahistoricalimages.o...r.jsp?R=451589

What it looks like now:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=3...oid=po-2210107

I looked at the back side of this building the other day and the brick is still there. Again, the little parapets on the roof line may have been demolished, I don't know, but it would be such a better building with brick. Also, the Foccacia Fiorentina building looks like shit with its stuccoed purple arch. I'm certain whatever it was before would be awesome to bring back to life, I just can't find a good picture of it.

There are several other smaller buildings around downtown and central Phoenix that would be so much nicer if their facades could be restored. I'm thinking of the MacAlpine's building on 7th street, and that llantera/wheel store on 7th Street and Roosevelt (brick building hiding behind a wall of corrugated steel).

Somehow we need to take the cue from Tucson and bring these structures back to life!
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  #92  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2010, 6:36 PM
mgmAZCO mgmAZCO is offline
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Great old pictures, and great idea! I think it would be great if these buildings could be restored to what they once were. The 'renovations' done to a lot of them don't look cohesive, and this would certainly bring back some of the history and uniqueness that you should find in a major city's downtown.
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  #93  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2010, 7:01 PM
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Not a bad idea at all. It would be awesonme to be eating in a Subway with a 20s' era-30s' era feel to it. Also I wonder if those 1 story buildings along Central have the option to add something above it like say apartments or a small private buisness. It's nice to have a modern downtown but then again we start making our historical buildings look like they were built yesterday.
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  #94  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2010, 4:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PHX31 View Post
/\ NIXPHX, can I get a copy of the self-guided driving tour guide that is mentioned on the Phoenix Historic Neighborhoods Coalition website? It says to ask for one.
Sure thing. i can drop one off to you; i think you live in Coronado as I do.
PM me your address. Thx.
PS - I've thought the same thing about the facades for a long time. and if Tucson can do it, we should be able to. Good for Tucson for doing that. i do plan on trying to foster this along here in Phx.
Thx for the pix and putting it out there.
Also, there was a plan about 10 years ago to restore the Heard Bldg.; maybe some day. also, i like the quiznos bldg's current look as well as old look.
It's current look may in fact be historic; it looks like it was changed in the 1940s perhaps. it used to have a cool old clock right at the corner on the awning til about 4 years ago.
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  #95  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2010, 4:57 AM
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Also, the Log Cabin Motel is gone, fyi. Sucks!!
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  #96  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2010, 9:36 AM
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http://www.azcentral.com/community/p...-landmark.html

Quote:
Long-shuttered Tovrea Castle undergoing renovations to finally receive visitors
by Lynh Bui - Sept. 12, 2010 09:51 PM
The Arizona Republic
With a long staff helping him up the way, John Driggs climbed the narrow wooden stairs of one of Phoenix's most famous and mysterious buildings.

Through each tier of the Tovrea Castle, Driggs excitedly pointed out historic aspects of the structure.


Carraro Cactus Garden

In the kitchen ceiling, he noted the bullet hole - shot during a robbery in the late 1960s.

Over the fireplace, he showed off the mantelpiece of a dancing ballerina - a gift from craftsmen who used the property's machine shop to create similar moldings for the Orpheum Theatre in downtown Phoenix.

And at the very top of the castle, he took in the view - surrounded by Papago Park, Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, Camelback Mountain and downtown Phoenix.

The former Phoenix mayor has had the privilege of strolling through the Tovrea Castle dozens of times but still marvels at the structure.

"I spent my whole early years in the car with my parents driving by," said Driggs, 83, who is helping to lead efforts to open the castle. "I had such wonderment as a little kid about this castle that no one could ever go in or know anything about."

Many Valley residents and visitors experience that same curiosity when they zoom by the castle on the hill along Loop 202. But Driggs' goal as chairman of the Arizona Capitol Centennial Committee is to get the Tovrea Castle and surrounding Carraro Cactus Garden open to the public in time for the state's 100th birthday so people can personally experience the magic.

This fall, Phoenix will start construction on the northwest corner of grounds to make way for a parking lot and bathrooms. An old, paint-chipped building that used to be a day-care center will be renovated into a visitor center. The $1.4 million project will provide more access to the property than ever before.

"With the city's tight budget, we won't be able to have staff there seven days a week, but we can do special events," Phoenix Deputy City Manager Rick Naimark said.

But the castle and garden still won't be officially open to the public, and it is still unclear whether that will happen by the state centennial Feb. 14, 2012.

The castle was built by Italian immigrant Alessio Carraro in the late 1920s and early 1930s. He envisioned turning the wedding-cake-shaped castle on the hill into the centerpiece of a resort property filled with a lush cactus garden.

Carraro abandoned his dream in 1931. That was shortly after his neighbors, the Tovrea family, constructed cattle and sheep pens nearby to supply the Tovreas' meatpacking plant. Carraro sold the property to E.A. and Della Tovrea, who turned the property into a private residence. Della died in 1969 of complications from an assault in a robbery that resulted in that bullet hole in the ceiling, and after that the property fell into disrepair. Cactuses died, and the castle started deteriorating.

In 1993, the city bought the castle and surrounding land to start preserving the area as a public park, and massive restoration efforts began. Since then, the city has purchased more than 43 acres of the property around 52nd and Van Buren streets.

More than $15 millions in grants, bonds and other money has poured into the project over nearly 20 years to buy and renovate the landmark after decades of languish.

Even though interior restoration of the castle finished last year, other buildings, fountains, gardens and other facilities need attention, said Dale Larsen, Phoenix director of parks and recreation. And although there will be bathrooms on the corner of the property, there won't be working facilities in the castle.

About $12 million more will be needed to get it fully open to the public, Larsen said.

"This has stood idle for decades now, and it's just a shame," Larsen said.

For the past few years, a group of volunteers called the Carraro Heights Society has been volunteering time to tend and restore the garden of more than 5,000 cactuses. That same group has adopted the park through the city's Adopt-a-Park program and has offered to help with tours and fundraising. The non-profit Phoenix Parks and Conservation Foundation has also designated the park as its main fundraising project and is interested in sponsoring events and tours to raise money.

Driggs said he hopes to excite other donors to fill in the rest of the gaps. "We want private money to flood in," Driggs said. "If we can get enough excitement for this, we could almost make it by the centennial."
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  #97  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2010, 6:40 AM
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Wanna really get depressed? Watch this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XyZY...layer_embedded
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  #98  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2010, 7:18 AM
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Quote:
Historical Phoenix freight depot gets new life

Once a hub of commerce, a long-empty 1929 railway building in Phoenix is switching to a new track as county offices

1 comment by Glen Creno - Nov. 27, 2010 09:00 PM
The Arizona Republic

A historical rail depot that once was a thriving hub of Phoenix commerce is getting a top-to-bottom fix-up and a second chance at life as county offices.

Maricopa County is spending nearly $4 million to restore and renovate the Santa Fe Freight Depot at Fifth Avenue and Jackson Street for use by the Assessor's Office. The county already owned the building, but it had become a dusty graveyard for broken chairs, old tables, copier parts and other county castoffs.

"That's what happens when you have an empty space in a big city," said Jim Brignall, president of Brignall Construction Co. of Phoenix, the contractor doing the renovation. "People find it and utilize it for their own uses. But it will be a nice corner. It will remind people of what it was."


The depot opened in 1929 and for years was a key shipment point for goods moving to and from Phoenix by railroad. Merchandise headed for department stores was collected there. A tunnel connected the depot to the ice-storage building nearby so the big blocks of ice that kept food fresh could be shuttled between buildings. The tunnel is still there and was used in the renovation to route a sewer line.

The assessor is closing four outlying offices around the Valley and will consolidate them in the renovated depot, scheduled to open in April. The county says it will save $700,000 to $800,000 a year in lease money it pays on the satellite offices without having to lay off the people who work in them. Sixty to 70 of the assessor's more than 320 employees will be based at the depot. One of the satellites will be converted for use by another county department.

"We need every one of those positions," Assessor Keith Russell said. "This is one-time money to fix this as opposed to annual money that gets spent every year, year in and year out, on those rents. In these tough economic times that's always a big plus, to be able to put some money towards people as opposed to buildings."

The depot has been vacant since the mid-'60s. Dick Carr, the depot project manager for the county, said the county has owned the depot for about 10 years. The 15,000-square-foot depot was scheduled for demolition in the early 2000s as part of a county construction project but was spared when preservationists objected. A parking garage sits just a few feet south of the depot.

The building is made of poured concrete reinforced with steel, making for what Carr said it is a very sturdy structure. A layer of asbestos was dug out of the floor, and lead paint and lead-encased wiring were removed.

"It was an environmental disaster zone," Carr said.

The building's exterior is on Phoenix's historical register and will be restored to its original look. Roll-up loading doors will be replaced with windows. The wood bumpers attached to the building, gouged by truck bumpers and brittle from decades of weather, will be replaced. The Santa Fe logos will remain. The renovated depot also will meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design green-building standards.

The depot will house the assessor's geographic information systems, fees processing, exemptions and residential property-valuation appeals. Even though the interior will be new, the railroad theme will be echoed. The county says it will borrow railroad artifacts, such things as old maps and railway guides from the Arizona Railway Museum, duplicate them and display them inside.

Patte Thornton, the project's architect, described the depot as an industrial building with Art Deco touches. Thornton, of Arrington Watkins Architects of Phoenix, said the building's original drawings are being used to guide the work.

She said one of the biggest jobs will be restoring the concrete face of the building's east side.

"That building's been abused," she said. "Nobody ever considered re-use of it."



Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/community/p...#ixzz16YjYToyH
This is good news, glad to see the old building finding a use. Its too bad that hideous over sized parking garage looms over it and creates such an eyesore.
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  #99  
Old Posted Sep 6, 2011, 5:29 PM
HX_Guy HX_Guy is offline
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Cool Then and Now that AZCentral.com put together...

http://www.azcentral.com/centennial/...n-and-now.html
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  #100  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2011, 7:34 PM
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I have mentioned this before on this website, but I'm not sure in which thread... you know the Security Building that was being renovated that also houses the PURL? Well, long ago I made an "urban exploration" trek into the penthouse of the building and discovered (for myself) the rooftop deck/garden:



Another picture I took at that time was of the crown of the building from the rooftop:



I have also posted this before, but notice what I think is a lantern?



How cool would it be for our nighttime skyline if that lantern still worked and could be turned on? Well, I figured ASU's PURL would be a perfect contact to see if we can get that lantern turned on at night... they'd be interested, right? Well, I sent a long-winded email to the PURL director, and here is her response:

Quote:
Absolutely fantastic idea!

Aaron (Asst. Director of PURL and ardent historic preservationist) -- do you know anything about this?

Thanks again for bringing this to our attention!
Her email was copied to "Aaron" and here is the response from him I got:

Quote:
I was very excited to received your email yesterday! I agree with you 100% that we should activate the lantern of the Security Building. I have started the conversation with a colleague from the Maricopa County offices (owner of the security building) about how we can activate the lantern at night. I will keep you posted with any news that comes about. Thank you again for your interest in PURL and the Security Building!
Who knows the condition of the lantern, who knows if the county person will drag their feet or make it a bigger deal than it needs to be (ie, they won't turn it on because it costs too much to renovate (if necessary), power costs, people will complain about a light being on at night)... but it was satisfying to bring this to their attention as well as get such a positive response.

Here's to hoping we have one more cool thing on our skyline at night!
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