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  #21  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2018, 2:46 PM
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TheNovaScotian TheNovaScotian is offline
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Takeo, the two are not mutually inclusive, even though you might want them to be.
The two are pretty similar, if you look at it from the supply side of things.
Most of the issues with the built environment are interconnected. Us thinking that the affordability problems here in Halifax aren't connected to the phobic nature of the loud few, would be shortsighted.
This fear permeates into heritage conservation, affordability and how our commercial districts lack the customer base to keep brick and mortar stores open like on Quinpool. We love to plan the cafes and commercial districts but never actually think about where the customer base will come from. Too afraid to upset the residents of an area to be honest to them and tell them they might have to accept new people into their growing neighborhood, if they want to enjoy having shops and services situated close by.

Quinpool has not done well over the last few decades. Stores and restaurants coming and going often. The Centre Plan is going to endanger the existing character of Quinpool to achieve the growth needed by having large amounts of low-rises replace the existing stock on the street. I expect more ugly vinyl siding specials like this to pop up in the area thanks to the Centre Plan.
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  #22  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2018, 5:49 PM
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Yeah, actually low-rise and affordable housing are mutually exclusive in areas with significant land costs, which is probably a category the Quinpool area fits into.

If you have land costs of $5M and you insist on 50 units on 3 floors instead of 150 units on 9 floors you've tripled the land cost per unit and bumped it up to $100,000 minimum before any shovels even hit the ground.

Any subsidy spent to reduce this cost could be redirected more productively toward adding more units to an existing development. So you are effectively trading away affordable housing either way so other people who already have housing can live near shorter developments. Generally this is a terrible trade-off, and the only reason why it happens is that the people who want to cut back on housing development don't pay the high costs of their preferences. If we made people pay $50,000 each to make the development next door shorter few of them would do it.
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  #23  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2018, 1:23 AM
Colin May Colin May is offline
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Originally Posted by TheNovaScotian View Post
The two are pretty similar, if you look at it from the supply side of things.
Most of the issues with the built environment are interconnected. Us thinking that the affordability problems here in Halifax aren't connected to the phobic nature of the loud few, would be shortsighted. Q:
Name 3 or more failed proposals for affordable housing on the peninsula. And define 'affordability'.
Singles in Charlottetown being forced out of rentals circa $800 a month. My guess is that the ever increasing number of foreign students,funded by their government or rich parents, in university towns and cities are impacting the rental market to the detriment of indigenous residents.
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  #24  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2018, 4:55 AM
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TheNovaScotian TheNovaScotian is offline
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Originally Posted by Colin May View Post
Name 3 or more failed proposals for affordable housing on the peninsula. And define 'affordability'.
Singles in Charlottetown being forced out of rentals circa $800 a month. My guess is that the ever increasing number of foreign students,funded by their government or rich parents, in university towns and cities are impacting the rental market to the detriment of indigenous residents.
Off the top of my head Bloomfield, Spirit Place and now this one. Add in all the floors lopped off of each proposal that would have allowed for more affordable units and increased overall supply and you see what I'm talking about. There's definitely a dysfunction in our attempts at affordable housing here in NS. The existing stock is in disrepair, having friends that lived in around the city and a summer job as a repo man gave me a up close and personal view of the units through the years. They're in really bad shape but most of the residents make due with whats there. With families occupying the same unit for decades and only minor repairs done. A change in approach is needed because the current system obviously is broken. We could be building new stock and retire some of the older ones. Looking into a basic minimum income is a more long term approach especially in areas that have international students skewing the rental market. The funny thing is this type of bottom up approach would provide a stimulus for the local economies as poor people spend money locally compared to higher up the socio-economic scale.

I agree completely with your take on affordability in Charlottetown and it's felt in many of the other smaller markets in Atlantic Canada as well.
They are more susceptible to even moderate shocks like the growth we've seen in NS recently. The decline in overall units available coupled with an aversion to change has made life harder than it has to be. There isn't a huge difference in the rents to justify the lack of services and opportunity in rural towns. No wonder people have to leave the towns and move to the city. They migrate to the urban centers for lack of a better option. Most of these towns have ample brownfield sites to fix this problem but progressive ideas seem in short supply these days when talking about housing.
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  #25  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2019, 2:56 PM
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The Ben's building is down now.
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  #26  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2019, 3:29 PM
JonHiseler JonHiseler is offline
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The Ben's building is down now.
It certainly created one large pile of rubble.
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  #27  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2019, 7:12 PM
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I wonder what the Rat/Mice situation was at the old Ben's site!
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