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  #261  
Old Posted May 6, 2019, 7:38 PM
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The usual BS rumours out there on the sale of the Als. One is Lapointe is back in the picture, told to keep quiet, and that all will be revealed after the CBA is signed. The last part makes sense.
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  #262  
Old Posted May 6, 2019, 7:45 PM
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^ I suppose it would be hard to conclude a deal before a CBA is reached, given that it's imminent (likely within the next month or two, almost certainly within the next six). I'm sure we'll hear an announcement as soon as that's done.
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  #263  
Old Posted May 6, 2019, 7:51 PM
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The Alouettes intend to take root in Montreal’s major business areas
Émilie Desgagné montrealalouettes.com April 15, 2019

“In the 1980s, the Alouettes left Montreal and only returned in 1996 when the Baltimore Stallions moved up North. Therefore, there are two generations of Quebecers who did not grow up with our team, and for whom the club’s identity only started to resonate during the winning 2000 to 2010 decade,” said Paul-André Côté during his speech to the Sponsorship Marketing Council Canada. “We need to remind those generations of our history, and to give them more reasons to come to love our brand.”

The Alouettes’ Vice-President of Integrated Marketing and Business Development was blunt: when you post losing seasons in Montreal, you lose your fans, you lose your employees, you lose your benchmarks… and, sometimes, you can become… completely lost.

“It’s normal to lose direction after several years of instability on all fronts, but we’ll never accept taking the ‘do nothing’ approach.”

On February 1 this year, we unveiled our new brand identity in front of an eclectic crowd: season ticket members, journalists, fans, sports enthusiasts from various milieus, Quebec celebrities and friends of VICE all came together to form an improbable group that beautifully represented Montreal’s diversity. Everyone – whether die-hard Alouettes fan or not – is part of this major turning point. It’s not everyday that a team decides to refurbish – heck, reinvent – everything: its DNA, its uniform, its slogan and its logo. And it’s no small matter to come to accept this type of change for the fans who think back fondly to the great Anthony Calvillo years and who proudly wear the team’s colours.

“Our Alouettes played in the Grey Cup game eight times between 2000 and 2010, winning three of those games. The brand’s DNA was grounded in winning. We were a championship organization during a decade when the Canadiens were trying to find themselves and the Impact were playing in the North American Soccer League. The environment was favourable for us,” Côté said. “Even if the primary goal remains to win, it is important that our organizational culture and our personality does not depend upon it.”

So, how – in the team’s current context – does one reach out to a generation of potential fans who do not have much of a historic attachment to the team’s branding… while at the same time not ignoring all those who stuck with the team through thick and thin?

That was the challenge faced by GRDN – our valued collaborator in this massive undertaking. They had to take all these factors into account when creating our new look. Piecing together three key elements – a plane to represent the Royal Canadian Air Force’s 425th tactical fighter squadron, a bird representing the team’s name and an M for the city the team represents – gave birth to the logo which, uniquely, is affixed to the top of the players’ helmets. There was never a question of forgetting or ignoring our history and our origins, but it was also imperative that we include the values which make Montreal the vibrant metropolis that it is today: creative, open, diversified, passionate, prideful, resilient and full of joie de vivre. Those values are our values. They define Montréals. There’s no age limit to adopt these values or identify with them. And there’s no age limit to love football, either.

Keep in mind that being a sports fan isn’t the same as it was 25 years ago, the Alouettes Vice-President of Integrated Marketing and Business Development said in his presentation.

“Season ticket memberships are declining, not only for us, but for everyone. As an organization, we need to re-think our offers to address the needs of today’s sports fan.”

The days of straightforward ticket sales are over. Fans want more now, they want to leave the stadium happy having just had a unique experience. For the second consecutive season, football fans will be able to purchase seats in the BBQ terrace or in the All You Can Eat section. The party animals will be able to enjoy the return of Budweiser Friday Night Lights when beer goes for $7.00 or might want to check out the new Huddle section with its terrace catering to social media aficionados.

“We eventually want to provide even more flexibility and more value for our season ticket members,” added Côté. “We’re presently working with Lune Rouge to develop technology that will offer virtual Montréals wallets. For example, a fan could obtain a $2,500 card which contains $2,000 worth of tickets to use at their own convenience, $500 in the boutique and a $1,000 bonus to be used with one of our commercial partners. The card would be rechargeable and also would give access to exclusive credits.”

Obviously, connecting with such a heterogeneous community can’t only be done with just a logo and new products.

“It’s one thing to say that we’re Montréal's, but we have to go from a PowerPoint presentation to reality. We have to be an active part of life in Montreal by integrating ourselves in each of the key activity sectors: the worlds of business and innovation, fashion and culture, music and entertainment, sport, food and education.”

An unexpected partnership with VICE QUÉBEC saw the light of day in 2018: The non-conformist media outlet will have its logo on the team’s official jerseys this year. The agreement creates an opportunity to reach a market that, normally, would not be in contact with our brand, and to address varied subjects like veganism or mental health, which are relevant to both our players and affected members of the public.

“The strategy is based upon collaborating with other Montreal brands. And our partners are a key component. At the launch, for instance, we decided to work with four trendy Montreal restaurants. We have also worked with local musicians and the Off the Hook boutique created exclusive products,” said Côté. “The idea is to become a reflection of Montreal, to develop alliances in each of the sectors, to use our platforms to shine a light on other local companies and vice versa. Why not even build bridges between ourselves and the other Montreal-area sports teams that would benefit both fans and sponsors?”

That our new partners believe in this project is priceless. Keeping those who’ve been sporting the team’s colours for years on board is priceless. Well, maybe not priceless since the ultimate goal is visibility.

“BMO played a key role in the launch of our new identity,” confirmed Côté. “The bank is a veritable pillar of our city. It’s exactly the type of business that we want to be associated with.”

The fit was equally perfect for BMO, according to Marie-Pier Bergevin, Senior Manager – Sponsorships and Brand Engagement, North America at BMO.

“Our history and our values were certainly the foundation for our interest in partnering with the Alouettes. The Bank of Montreal was founded more than 200 years ago. Over the course of those two centuries, our institution has experienced many adventures that our employees tackled together as a team,” she said. “The DNA of our institution is derived from the values of cooperation, passion and diversity.”

For 20 years, the team’s major partner has been present on the field to provide unique experiences for football fans.

“For us, it’s imperative to assume the role of a fan and not simply of a bank, and working with the Alouettes is a great example of doing that,” said Bergevin. “It explains why we so enthusiastically entered into this sports partnership. It is essential for us to support the team in this new era and ensure both of our organizations shine. Our involvement is a testament to our support of the Alouettes, but also towards our city!”


At the official launch, as well in context of several BMO / Alouettes tuque distribution activities highlighting the big reveal, the bank was able to reach the community in an entertaining way. The BMO brand has also now been connected with a transformation that generated between 80 and 90 million impressions in a two-week period along with a return on investment ratio of 13:1.

Together, our team and the BMO team got the media’s attention over the course of an entire weekend. And not just any weekend: it was Super Bowl weekend! We successfully drew the attention of not only Montrealers but Canadians from all parts of the country in the midst of an important event in the sports world… and our players weren’t even on the field.

And we’re just getting started.

“We’re hoping that being ‘Toujours Game’ will take root in the lives and hearts of Quebecers, and will also give them pride in their city. We’re not just a team of 46 players and a coaching staff, we are 8 million and have an entire island to rep for,” concluded Côté.
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  #264  
Old Posted May 6, 2019, 8:26 PM
blueandgoldguy blueandgoldguy is offline
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The Bombers, TiCats and Als are the big winners at this year's CFL draft.

The Als did well considering how many picks Kavis traded away last year.

https://theratiobreaker.com/2019/05/...mpression=true
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  #265  
Old Posted May 6, 2019, 8:31 PM
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Getting Wilkinson (a top three prospect) at number 21 was pretty good. Glad buddy agrees with me, I posted that the Bombers had the best draft.
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  #266  
Old Posted May 7, 2019, 7:58 PM
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Economic impact of 106th Grey Cup exceeds $81 million
CFL.ca Staff May 7 2019

EDMONTON — The 106th Grey Cup presented by Shaw, hosted in Edmonton last November, had a total economic impact of more than $81 million, a new study shows.

Overall attendance at Grey Cup events throughout the week reached 430,967, including 55,819 who attended the Grey Cup championship game itself and 30,841 visitors from out of town who spent $29 million during their stay in the city.

More than 93 per cent of the attendees reported having a positive experience at the Grey Cup Festival and two-thirds felt it was better than most of its predecessors, according to the Global Sports Impact Study conducted by Sportcal, a leading provider of sports market intelligence based in London, England.

“These impressive numbers are a testament to the support we received from the people of Edmonton and Alberta, the contributions made by our partners, the hard work of our staff and an army of volunteers, and the power of the Grey Cup itself to attract Canadians from every corner of the country,” said Brad Sparrow, Chair of the Edmonton Eskimo Board of Directors and Co-Chair of the 2018 Grey Cup Festival Committee.

Randy Ambrosie, Commissioner of the Canadian Football League, said the study underlines the enormous effect the Grey Cup game and the festival have on a city and province.

“As proud as we are as Canadians, we can sometimes take our greatest treasures for granted,” Ambrosie said.

“This study, like the ones that have preceded it, show that the Grey Cup is more than a source of fun, pride and unity. It’s a giant-sized economic funnel that pours dollars and people into a host city and province at a time of year that can otherwise be slow for tourism.”

The study says the Grey Cup was also a source of civic pride: 93 per cent of local citizens surveyed agreed that the Grey Cup had a positive impact on the city and 94 per cent said the city of Edmonton should host the Grey Cup again.

The report also cites the event’s social impact. It engaged an estimated 1,000 volunteers, featured flag football and football skills sessions for youth, and included visits from 4,000 school children from 40 schools who were granted special access, a Diversity is Strength party that celebrated inclusion and campaigns designed to counteract violence against women.

Among the other findings:

The total economic impact of $81,146,423 is estimated to be a 6.6 per cent increase from the Grey Cup in 2017.

A total of 381 accredited media attended during the week, an increase of 20 per cent compared to the previous year.

More than 9,100 stories were published about Grey Cup week, a 62 per cent increase over 2017, complementing a strong social media presence throughout the week.

More than 40 festival partners, and 32 league partners activated during the week, adding to the fun and excitement of the Grey Cup experience for attendees.

The Grey Cup game garnered a television audience of 3.3 million with a reach of 8.4 million.

The average number of days attended by fans was 2.9 days; 11 per cent attended all five days of the event.

Thirty per cent of all fans – and 58 per cent of those aged 19 to 34 – attended a Grey Cup event for the first time.

Women and those aged 19 to 24 were most likely to score events highly.

“We look forward to the 107th Grey Cup presented by Shaw this November in Calgary, home to our football rivals but also our fellow Albertans, and the Grey Cups that will follow in Regina in 2020 and Hamilton in 2021,” Sparrow said.

“We have worked to set a high bar. We know our friends and colleagues across the CFL will work just as hard to meet it or even exceed it and Canadians will continue to rally around the Grey Cup.”
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  #267  
Old Posted May 8, 2019, 6:21 PM
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And Ricky Ray announces his retirement

https://twitter.com/TorontoArgos/sta...70688581177344
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  #268  
Old Posted May 8, 2019, 6:51 PM
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One of the best to ever play in the CFL. Loved watching him in Edmonton for so many years.

I have a feeling we will see him in some kind of coaching capacity down the line.
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  #269  
Old Posted May 10, 2019, 4:23 PM
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The labour situation is starting to go off the rails a bit...

Quote:
On Thursday, Canadian Football League Players Association executive director Brian Ramsay made it clear players would be instructed not to report to training camp if a new deal is not reached once the current CBA expires.

But it's a little more complicated than that. Because of provincial labour laws, players in Edmonton, Calgary, Hamilton, Ottawa and Toronto would have to report to camp. But players in Vancouver, Regina, Winnipeg and Montreal would not be forced to show up to camp.

With the first pre-season game scheduled on Sunday, May 26, the clock is ticking and concern is growing from the players' side.
https://www.cbc.ca/sports/football/c...-cba-1.5129914

It's looking more and more like the teams have the players over a barrel again.
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  #270  
Old Posted May 13, 2019, 4:31 PM
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Inside the War Room: Draft Day
Mike Hogan Staff Writer argonauts.ca May 3, 2019

Argonauts.ca’s Mike Hogan was granted access to the “War Room” on draft night. He’s able to share a behind-the-scenes look at what happened before and during the draft. The only stipulation was that he not mention the names of players that were not drafted by the Argos, or the teams that Jim Popp was talking trade with.

For General Manager Jim Popp and company, the draft started months, even years ago. Countless hours of preparation would culminate in a three-hour exercise that would see a total of ten players join the organization.

The player personnel department’s usual place of business is their offices at the Coca-Cola Coliseum, a modest par-3 east of BMO Field. On this night the “War Room” was moved to the defensive coaches’ office at the stadium, a mere one-minute walk to where the organization was holding a draft party for season ticket holders, an idea Popp himself had pushed hard for.

Argonauts.ca arrived at the Coliseum at roughly 4:00, four hours before the draft was to begin. The personnel staff was just wrapping up its final preparations in its usual gathering spot. The heavy lifting was done, now there was a lengthy wait for the proceedings to begin.

When the staff reassembled at BMO Field the jeans and sweatshirts were gone. Jackets and ties were the order of the night. As staff members rolled in there were some last-minute discussions about potential draftees, there was some conversation about that night’s Raptors game. It was mostly small talk, though there was some discussion about a couple of potential trades, none of which seemed to spark much interest.

“We’ve been wheeling and dealing all day,” Popp said when asked if his phone had been ringing often, “But there’s nothing happening.”

The General Manager and his Director of Canadian scouting Vince Magri sat at the head of the table. To their right, college and pro scout Justin Hickman and Director of Football Administration Catherine Raiche, to their left a pair of newcomers to the department, Coordinator of Football Operations/Logistics Alex Russell and Matt Black, who has moved from the defensive secondary to the scouting staff. Head Coach Corey Chamblin would spend most of the time before the draft in his adjacent office, before joining the group a few minutes before the draft, taking his seat just behind Hickman. The side of the table opposite Popp and Magri was vacant so they could see a giant screen on the wall, listing available players, or the draft order, which would be updated after each selection. There was also a giant-screen TV so everyone could watch the TSN broadcast.

Also in the room was the Argos Director of Video Jon Magri, who updated the draft and the list of available players, Manager of Football Media Chris Balenovich, Community Manager Adam Krueger, and this reporter from Argonauts.ca.

There was no suspense in terms of who the team would take with its first-overall pick, Shane Richards had been in Toronto for several days. The team wanted to spend more time with him and wanted to surprise fans at the draft party by having him enter the room and sign a contract in front of 200 or so witnesses.

Richards arrived in the draft room at 6:25, joined by his mother, father and two sisters. To avoid being seen and ruining the surprise, the family entered through the west side of the stadium, the opposite side from where fans were entering BMO Club, the site of the party.

After a brief chat with the staff, the Richards family headed upstairs to a private suite where they could relax before the big moment.

There was still roughly an hour-and-a-half to go before the draft was to begin. All eyes turned to the TSN screen as the CFL panel discussed what may lay ahead.

Then more waiting. It was a common theme of the night.

At 7:10 Popp discussed a trade offer and a potential counter offer. There didn’t seem to be much interest from anyone at the table to make the deal and the conversation ended quickly, but it would not be the last trade offer of the night.

At roughly 7:45 a TSN camera entered the room to get a shot of those assembled. Ten minutes later a conference call with the league began. CFL Senior Director of Football Operations Ryan Janzen took a roll call and explained how the draft would work. Each team would give its pick to Janzen, who would pass it on to the Commissioner. In the first round, a team had six minutes to make a pick, the time between selections would decrease as the rounds progressed.

In the past, picks were being leaked to the outside media. To prevent that from happening Janzen would read the latest pick over the conference call at exactly the same time Ambrosie was reading the name on the broadcast.

It was remarkably quiet in the room as Ambrosie opened the draft with the words “Toronto Argonauts, you’re now on the clock.”

While the speculation continued nationally, there was zero surprises about who the first pick would be. Popp planned to make the draft call at 8:05. He would announce the pick by giving the player’s number on the master list of eligible players, position and school.

He made the call, and after some small talk with Janzen made the choice.

“The Toronto Argonauts, with their first pick, select number 495, Shane Richards, offensive tackle, Oklahoma State.”

Done. The months of preparation, the video study, the interviews with players and their coaches, the live workouts, the mock drafts, the contract discussions, all to arrive at the player the Argos deemed worthy of the top pick in the draft.

Immediately after the selection, and before the pick was announced on TSN, Popp and Chamblin would walk down a long hallway and outside to a stadium concourse. They’d meet the Richards family, then move inside to speak to the enthusiastic fans gathered for the party.

After Popp and Chamblin spoke, the fans were in for a big surprise, in fact, a 6’6”, 334-pound surprise, as the newest Argo was introduced to cheers so loud they were easily heard in the War Room. The surprise was magnified when Richards, Popp and Chamblin signed a contract on the stage, two years plus an option.

The room exploded. Stevie Wonder’s “Signed, Sealed, Delivered” played over the speakers as Richards was presented with an Argos #68 jersey with his name on it. It was a great moment to be a fan of the Double Blue.

Quickly, Popp and Chamblin headed back to continue prepping for the ninth-overall pick. The night was far from over, and the GM was about to make his toughest decision of the night.

Another GM called to make a serious trade offer. He offered his first rounder – slightly higher than the ninth pick – to the Argos for the ninth and the 20th overall picks.

The discussion immediately became intense. The Argos wanted a specific player but knew that they’d either get that player, or another very good player with whomever fell to them at nine. Was it worth giving up the 20th pick, which could be another very good player in what was universally looked upon as being a deep draft, in exchange to move up a couple of picks or so?

The eventual consensus was that it wasn’t worth it and they passed on the proposal, though they were really tempted to make the deal.

When their pick came up it was a choice between two players. There was serious discussion weighing the pros and cons of the two potential picks. After everyone at the table had their say, it was decided that Robbie Smith, a defensive end from Laurier, would become an Argo.

“He’s very strong,” Popp said of Smith. “He can stand up and take people on. He can really close fast and get upfield, and we feel like he can be a really good special teams player. We feel he can make the team now, not down the road, but now.”

Popp and Chamblin spoke to the Brampton native on the phone before the pick was announced by the league, then the pair headed back to the party. They explained why they chose Smith, then announced that last year’s third-round pick, receiver Regis Cibasu from Universite de Montreal, had agreed to terms. Again, as a surprise, Ciabsu was introduced to the crowd and presented with a #83 jersey. The crowd roared its approval.

As the night progressed, and with at times a lengthy wait between picks, the room sounded much like a group of friends gathered for a fantasy draft. Some of the other teams’ picks were praised, others questioned – exactly like in every other War Room around the league. When it was over, ten players had been selected by Toronto, including UBC quarterback Michael O’Connor, whose selection was cheered so loudly at the party it was heard loudly and clearly in the War Room.

For Popp and his staff, the night’s work ended at exactly 11:00 when he announced the Argos were selecting offensive lineman Eric Starczala from Guelph.

It was then time to exhale, enjoy a beverage, and take stock of what had been achieved.

Collectively the group was surprised that a couple of players dropped to them, most notably Laurier wide receiver Kurleigh Gittens Jr., Justin Hickman was astonished the Argos were able to get him where they did.

“We had him ranked fairly high,” Hickman told Argonauts.ca after the draft. “To get him where we got him was great value. When I watched the film I saw a playmaker, someone who when he got the ball in his hands made things happen. He goes and gets the ball, he’s got some slither, he’s got some wiggle, he’s going to bring some toughness to the position. I think he can be an immediate starter.”

The ironic thing is that the two players being debated with the No. 23 pick were Gittens and offensive lineman Maurice Simba from Concordia. Simba was still there when the Argos picked at No. 29. They literally got both of their men.

Vince Magri was pumped about Gittens and one other player specifically among those not chosen with pick numbers one and nine.

“We’re thrilled to have Michael O’Connor,” he said. “We had him right up at the top of our board. So was Kurleigh Gittens and we definitely didn’t think he was going to be there at that pick.”

He went back to praising the QB.

“Looking around the league right now he’s probably just as good, if not better than a lot of guys who are under contract,” said Magri.

He also pointed out how happy they were to get defensive back Jamie Harry from Ottawa where they did.

It wasn’t a perfect night, no draft gives a team everyone it wants. There were a couple of cases where a player was selected two or three picks before the Argos were ready to choose them, but invariably they were happy with who they drafted instead.

The next stop is to look at these players in camp. Some will head back to school, others may sign with an NFL team, but don’t be surprised if a handful of them make either the team or the practice roster this season, meaning the Canadian talent on the Argos is improving.

That was the goal from the time Randy Ambrosie opened the draft.
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  #271  
Old Posted May 14, 2019, 3:34 PM
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Sounds like CFL bargaining went late into the night last night, is planned for a long day today and could go longer if they are making progress.
Lets get this deal done!!!

Matthew Scianitti from Twitter @TSNScianitti

Hearing @CFLPA @CFL Monday bargaining session went late into the night. Tuesday’s talks are, at this point, expected to go late into the night, as well. Hearing those involved planned to meet May 12-14, but packed in case meetings extended late into the week #CFL #CFLPA
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  #272  
Old Posted May 14, 2019, 4:26 PM
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  #273  
Old Posted May 14, 2019, 4:30 PM
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^ Good pickup for Sask.

I will never forget his Blue Bombers days... we were used to good punting with Bob Cameron, but Jon Ryan was on another level. Just massive, booming punts with amazing hangtime. No one was surprised when he went to the NFL directly after his CFL contract expired.

Not sure how his leg is these days but if Cameron was any indication, they last long when taken care of properly
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  #274  
Old Posted May 14, 2019, 5:32 PM
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^ Good pickup for Sask.

I will never forget his Blue Bombers days... we were used to good punting with Bob Cameron, but Jon Ryan was on another level. Just massive, booming punts with amazing hangtime. No one was surprised when he went to the NFL directly after his CFL contract expired.

Not sure how his leg is these days but if Cameron was any indication, they last long when taken care of properly
I think his leg is still pretty good! As a 10+ year vet his minimum salary in the NFL is over $1 million, and I think that's part of the reason he hasn't been picked up by another NFL team. He's reported to have said that he wants to play for another 10 years.
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  #275  
Old Posted May 14, 2019, 8:34 PM
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Sounds like CFL bargaining went late into the night last night, is planned for a long day today and could go longer if they are making progress.
CFLPA advises players: ‘prepare to report’ for CFL training camps
3Down Staff - May 14, 2019

The Canadian Football players’ association has let the membership know they should be ready to attend training camp.

More than 97 per cent of the players voted to strike if needed, but the negotiations appear to have turned in a positive direction because the player have been advised to report for training camps when they open on May 19.

The CFL made a unilateral decision to delay negotiations until April 29. B.C. Lions linebacker Solomon Elimimian said the union was prepared for any situation during the bargaining process.

The CFLPA’s bargaining committee followed by instructing players not to arrange travel to the league’s member clubs for training camp. The group has also informed players that the association does not intend to work past May 18th unless a new deal can first be agreed upon.

Players reported to training camp in May of 2014 without a CBA in place
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  #276  
Old Posted May 14, 2019, 8:37 PM
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Not sure how his leg is these days but if Cameron was any indication, they last long when taken care of properly
Lui Passaglia as well. I think this is as much a PR/Ambassador role as well. Hell, he might be popular enough to run for Parliament if the brother in law becomes PM.
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  #277  
Old Posted May 14, 2019, 8:38 PM
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^ So have the players actually negotiated a deal they like, or have the owners got them over a barrel and they know it?
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  #278  
Old Posted May 14, 2019, 10:35 PM
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^ So have the players actually negotiated a deal they like, or have the owners got them over a barrel and they know it?
I don't think it would be the latter or they wouldn't have shown as much bravado going in. Win, win, I would say.
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  #279  
Old Posted May 15, 2019, 1:28 PM
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News reports this morning say that a tentative deal has been reached, subject to ratification by teams and players... no details yet.

But still... barring some last minute hiccup, football is just around the corner!
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  #280  
Old Posted May 15, 2019, 6:35 PM
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Seems like a status quo deal to kick things down the road until a new TV deal is settled.
  • New CBA is for three years.
  • Salary cap continues to increase $50K/year as under current deal.
  • Minimum salary to be $65K under second year of CBA.
  • New CBA will expire same year as TSN deal (2021).
  • Canadian QBs now included in Canadian ratio of players.
  • Additional spot on team rosters for an international player.

@FarhanLaljiTSN
effect of the #CFL salary cap going up less than 1% and the minimum salaries going up 20% is that veteran players will have to take pay cuts next off season.

@danralphcp
Hearing there’ll be no change to Cdn ratio in’19 but no one can seem to answer whether that also pertains to future years of agreement.

Lalji is also reporting that players now get 20% of the TSN deal and further CFL2.0 measures.

Last edited by JHikka; May 15, 2019 at 8:50 PM.
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