HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #17281  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2018, 12:41 AM
Jayfar's Avatar
Jayfar Jayfar is offline
Midrise
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 573
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kidphilly View Post
Does anyone know the true level of remediation that would be required at 22nd?


and if so, would a parking podium help (I know but still that lot needs something large)
It was a gas works (going all the way back to the 1850s, according the the philageohistory.org map viewer), so I don't understand what would have caused an environmental issue. I could be missing something though.
__________________
Philadelphia Industrial & Commercial Heritage
A public Facebook group to promote the appreciation of Greater Philadelphia's industrial and commercial history and advocate for historic preservation and adaptive re-use.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17282  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2018, 1:56 AM
Nova08 Nova08 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingtut View Post
Nice finance news for the Philly Metro .
https://pitchbook.com/news/articles/...teractive-maps
I don't know...I read these numbers as an indicator at how far Philly still needs to go to consistently be in lock step with Boston, Chicago, Austin, or Atlanta. Philly saw the biggest YoY drop in 2017 of VC investment, with only 4 cities out of 18 that saw drops in 2017. I think this is the unintended benefit of landing Amazon that will allow Philly to get in the game that these big boys are already playing.

$646 million VC investment in Philly in 2017
$9 billion in Boston
$2 billion in Chicago
$1.2 billion in Atlanta
$1.1 billion in Austin
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17283  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2018, 2:11 AM
hammersklavier's Avatar
hammersklavier hammersklavier is offline
Your 2016 AAC Champs!
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Polis Philou Adelfou
Posts: 5,600
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kidphilly View Post
Does anyone know the true level of remediation that would be required at 22nd?


and if so, would a parking podium help (I know but still that lot needs something large)
It was the site of a gas storage plant for more than a century. So think something like the remediation you have to do with an old gas station, but on steroids. This site is probably optimal for something involving underground parking (if you have to remove all the dirt there anyway...) but it's dubious whether it would be able to command the kind of price you need for such a project, especially given its known contamination issues and neighboring underdeveloped parcels.
__________________
Urban Rambles | Hidden City

Who knows but that, on the lower levels, I speak for you?’ (Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17284  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2018, 2:13 AM
iheartphilly iheartphilly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,420
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nova08 View Post
I don't know...I read these numbers as an indicator at how far Philly still needs to go to consistently be in lock step with Boston, Chicago, Austin, or Atlanta. Philly saw the biggest YoY drop in 2017 of VC investment, with only 4 cities out of 18 that saw drops in 2017. I think this is the unintended benefit of landing Amazon that will allow Philly to get in the game that these big boys are already playing.

$646 million VC investment in Philly in 2017
$9 billion in Boston
$2 billion in Chicago
$1.2 billion in Atlanta
$1.1 billion in Austin
Yep. And we didn't break the $1 billion mark. I also presume that Comcast is doing most of the VC investment in that figure. So, to your point, Amazon would play the role of VC and help boost that number up.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17285  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2018, 2:23 AM
Nova08 Nova08 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartphilly View Post
Yep. And we didn't break the $1 billion mark. I also presume that Comcast is doing most of the VC investment in that figure. So, to your point, Amazon would play the role of VC and help boost that number up.
It's not just investment from Amazon. VC firms who sort of overlook Philly for NYC, Boston, or DC will all of a sudden have us on their map. Presumably more start ups have an easier time to obtain funding and stay in the city. That attracts more Penn or Drexel grads, or Amazon alumni to start their own thing and the snow ball really starts to speed down hill. And in turn Philly hopefully gets some more big time start ups and exits that really propel it to the big leagues.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17286  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2018, 2:45 AM
Stg4100 Stg4100 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 14
I do not normally post, more that of a reader. I do have to throw in a little on the Driverless car technology from a manufacturer automotive technician stand point. As a manufacturer technician i do not not care who is driving as long as it breaks and needs service. It is going to be a long time before cars can fix themselves.

Mom and Pop shops will suffer but they already are due the technology going into these cars, just for chrysler my Laptop and diagnosing tools run about $1500, now try to have that for all makes.

I believe it is sad that someone was hit and killed but to tell the truth if one looks at a human driver mileage to deadly accident vs Uber and Googles driverless cars, there is no comparison. Manufacturers will keep moving towards driverless because they will make more money. Big corporations will buy them up and charge the public to ride in them, roads will slowly not allow driven cars which allows more driverless, with the added mileage of not sitting in the driveway for 12 hours more cars will be over mileage sold to scrap and new cars will replace.

Plus with a car owned by a corporation will not have half the warrenty issues due to the fact their isnt a human in it long enough to complain about a dash rattle, which is a hard fix and can cost the manufacturer upwards of $2000 to fix. To name one example.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17287  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2018, 5:15 AM
Jayfar's Avatar
Jayfar Jayfar is offline
Midrise
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 573
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
It was the site of a gas storage plant for more than a century. So think something like the remediation you have to do with an old gas station, but on steroids. This site is probably optimal for something involving underground parking (if you have to remove all the dirt there anyway...) but it's dubious whether it would be able to command the kind of price you need for such a project, especially given its known contamination issues and neighboring underdeveloped parcels.
I was thinking this site handled the storage of natural gas, which certainly is nothing like gasoline or other liquid petroleum products and byproducts which would seep into the earth.
__________________
Philadelphia Industrial & Commercial Heritage
A public Facebook group to promote the appreciation of Greater Philadelphia's industrial and commercial history and advocate for historic preservation and adaptive re-use.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17288  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2018, 3:47 PM
Knight Hospitaller's Avatar
Knight Hospitaller Knight Hospitaller is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Greater Philadelphia
Posts: 2,082
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
It was the site of a gas storage plant for more than a century. So think something like the remediation you have to do with an old gas station, but on steroids. This site is probably optimal for something involving underground parking (if you have to remove all the dirt there anyway...) but it's dubious whether it would be able to command the kind of price you need for such a project, especially given its known contamination issues and neighboring underdeveloped parcels.
It's just a case for when/how long, not if, given the westward migration of the city center. Eventually the parcel will be too valuable not to remediate and build, even if it is the last lot to go.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17289  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2018, 10:00 PM
MichaelScottsOffice MichaelScottsOffice is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 86
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17290  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2018, 4:49 PM
MichaelScottsOffice MichaelScottsOffice is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 86
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17291  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2018, 9:16 PM
hammersklavier's Avatar
hammersklavier hammersklavier is offline
Your 2016 AAC Champs!
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Polis Philou Adelfou
Posts: 5,600
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayfar View Post
I was thinking this site handled the storage of natural gas, which certainly is nothing like gasoline or other liquid petroleum products and byproducts which would seep into the earth.
Another possibility: it handled kerosene. The site dates at least to the 1860s IIRC, and at the time the dominant use of oil was kerosene for lamp fuel (which was starting to replace whale oil). Kerosene is much more like gasoline than natural gas, being liquid among other things.
__________________
Urban Rambles | Hidden City

Who knows but that, on the lower levels, I speak for you?’ (Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17292  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2018, 10:58 PM
acenturi acenturi is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 320
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelScottsOffice View Post
[urlxx]https://www.google.com/amp/www.philly.com/philly/news/philadelphia-population-census-data-20180322.html%3famphtml=y[/url]
Why is it that philly.com always digs out a negative from just about every positive event. I can't stand that RAG and never read it, unless it's referenced. I swear if Amazon decided on SY, I wouldn't be surprised if they come up with some sordid comment like the pollution from the Schuylkill will be detrimental to the health of the employees.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17293  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2018, 11:49 PM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
1000 µg = 2D Mandelbrot
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Jersey - Somerset County
Posts: 22,460
Was reading on the new population estimates, and Philly is over 1.58 mil. 11th year of growth. 1,580,863 to be precise, which increased from 2016 to 2017 by 6,098.

I hope it rises more than that for this year.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17294  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2018, 12:21 AM
jjv007 jjv007 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 629
so essentially stagnant. ^^
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17295  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2018, 12:27 AM
Jayfar's Avatar
Jayfar Jayfar is offline
Midrise
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 573
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
Another possibility: it handled kerosene. The site dates at least to the 1860s IIRC, and at the time the dominant use of oil was kerosene for lamp fuel (which was starting to replace whale oil). Kerosene is much more like gasoline than natural gas, being liquid among other things.
Maybe, but even the 1858-60 map shows it as gas works, with each tank labeled "Gasometer," which by definition, per wikipedia, seems to imply natural gas.

"A gas holder, or gasometer, is a large container in which natural gas or town gas is stored near atmospheric pressure at ambient temperatures. The volume of the container follows the quantity of stored gas, with pressure coming from the weight of a movable cap."

And according to their history page, PGW has supplied natural gas since 1836.

https://www.pgworks.com/residential/...gw/our-history
__________________
Philadelphia Industrial & Commercial Heritage
A public Facebook group to promote the appreciation of Greater Philadelphia's industrial and commercial history and advocate for historic preservation and adaptive re-use.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17296  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2018, 12:31 AM
frbrown's Avatar
frbrown frbrown is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 39
Since the 2010 census, Philadelphia has added about 54,000 people. For some fun context that is about the population of Philadelphia during the 1810 census (and modern day Harrisburg).

Since the 2010 census, Philadelphia Metropolitan Area has added 130,000 people which is probably close to the Population of Philadelphia in 1854, before the county consolidation.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17297  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2018, 1:41 AM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 12,358
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjv007 View Post
so essentially stagnant. ^^
Still better than nothing, or a decline. Don’t be a Debbie downer. Growth is growth, even if slow growth... still a positive nonetheless
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17298  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2018, 1:42 AM
PhilliesPhan's Avatar
PhilliesPhan PhilliesPhan is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Philadelphia Area
Posts: 617
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjv007 View Post
so essentially stagnant. ^^
Although the city’s growth appears relatively stagnant, I saw something very positive in the report: it seems as though the level of negative net domestic migration, while still occurring, has significantly slowed compared to previous years. The end of the 2010s will prove to be a pivotal point in the city’s history: we have a real chance at reversing the decades-long trend of domestic outmigration. With more Millennials staying in the city, more college kids who will choose to stay here upon graduation (like myself), and a job growth rate that continues to outpace the nation, Philadelphia has the chance to capitalize on growth opportunities and keep residents that have moved here. I can see it happening, but we need the people in power to want the same thing for the city.
__________________
No one outsmarts a Fox!

Temple University '18 ']['
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17299  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2018, 2:00 AM
El Duderino's Avatar
El Duderino El Duderino is offline
build awesome buildings
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 279
^there is also the fact that many other large, premier cities experienced the same type of migration - seems to be neither a negative or a positive, just a macro urban trend.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17300  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2018, 2:30 PM
JohnIII JohnIII is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 201
Some of you may think this is very fun but I'll say it. Out of all my decades of living in Philly I've never seen a census form in person; neither did my parents. My grandparents did see a census form when they were young back in the 1920's so though its a funny yet sad fact; its actually saying something.

Now that I think of it; I don't know anyone whose seen a census form; a couple of my friends were joking about it last week because they were saying why were they taxed if nobody knows they live in the city. It was pretty funny because they were so drunk.

Now that I think of it; I've never even seen a person who takes the census. Based on my personal experience I really don't know if anyone actually knows how many people live in Philadelphia; its somewhere over 1.6 million I guess but I wouldn't be surprised at all if we actually had well over 2 million
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:05 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.