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  #201  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2013, 1:34 PM
nito nito is offline
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Crossrail
Crossrail is now 40% on its way to completion.


Image sourced from @Crossrail: https://twitter.com/Crossrail


Image sourced from @Crossrail: https://twitter.com/Crossrail

Farringdon
Plans have been submitted illustrating the eastern entrance to Farringdon station and above-station development. The grand building seen in many views is the historic Smithfield meat market.


Image sourced from crossrai.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...n#.UcxG_aycHwk


Image sourced from crossrai.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...n#.UcxG_aycHwk


Image sourced from crossrai.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...n#.UcxG_aycHwk


Image sourced from crossrai.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...n#.UcxG_aycHwk

Canary Wharf

Image sourced from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...n#.UcxHAqycHwk


Image sourced from @Crossrail: https://twitter.com/Crossrail

Liverpool Street
Various pictures of development of the Crossrail station beneath Liverpool Street and Moorgate.


Image source from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...s#.UcxHCKycHwk


Image source from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...s#.UcxHCKycHwk


Image source from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...s#.UcxHCKycHwk


Image source from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...s#.UcxHCKycHwk


Image source from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...s#.UcxHCKycHwk


Image source from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...s#.UcxHCKycHwk

Abbey Wood
Abbey Wood is currently a station on the North Kent Line and is due to become the south-eastern terminal for Crossrail. The North Kent Line onwards towards Dartford and Gravesend has been safeguarded for a future extension of Crossrail.


Image sourced from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...-at-abbey-wood


Image sourced from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...-at-abbey-wood


Image sourced from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...-at-abbey-wood


Image sourced from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...-at-abbey-wood


Image sourced from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...-at-abbey-wood


Image sourced from crossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...-at-abbey-wood

Stepney Green
Ongoing work to complete the subterranean junction for the eastern spurs onwards towards Shenfield and Abbey Wood.


Image sourced from rossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...e#.UcxHGKycHwk


Image sourced from rossrail.co.uk: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...e#.UcxHGKycHwk


Image taken by Conquip Industrial (Lightfoot1974 on skyscrapercity.com): http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1492


Image taken by Conquip Industrial (Lightfoot1974 on skyscrapercity.com): http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1492

Tottenham Court Road
Western entrance to the Tottenham Court Road station.


Image taken by IanVisits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianvisi...in/photostream


Image taken by IanVisits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianvisi...in/photostream


Image taken by IanVisits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianvisi...in/photostream


Image taken by IanVisits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianvisi...in/photostream


Image taken by IanVisits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianvisi...in/photostream
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  #202  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2013, 1:36 PM
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Hitchin ECML Flyover
A new flyover of the East Coast Main Line allowing grade-separated travel for Cambridge bound trains has recently been completed. The northbound track flyover runs around an industrial estate before rejoining the southbound track on the Cambridge Line. The flyover will allow for greater operational flexibility and reduced delays at a heavily used junction.

Video Link



Image source from Network Rail: http://www.networkrailmediacentre.co...over-1db6.aspx


Image source from Network Rail: http://www.networkrailmediacentre.co...over-1db6.aspx


Image source from Network Rail: http://www.networkrailmediacentre.co...over-1db6.aspx


Garden Bridge
Transport for London has commissioned Heatherwick Studios to design a new ‘green’ pedestrian bridge across the Thames between Waterloo & Blackfriars bridges. The bridge will link the South Bank to Temple, Theatreland and the eastern fringes of the West End. The £60mn project which will incorporate trees, plants and flowers will however require a private sponsor to ensure it is completed.

Heatherwick Studios are recognised for producing some rather unique and interesting projects including the London 2012 Olympic cauldron and the UK pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo.


Image sourced from www.architizer.com: http://www.architizer.com/en_us/blog...ver-the-thames


Image sourced from www.architizer.com: http://www.architizer.com/en_us/blog...ver-the-thames


Image sourced from www.architizer.com: http://www.architizer.com/en_us/blog...ver-the-thames


Image sourced from www.architizer.com: http://www.architizer.com/en_us/blog...ver-the-thames


Earlsfield Station
Located on the South West Main Line between Wimbledon and Clapham Junction, Earlsfield is a busy commuter station with annual patronage of 5.4mn. At the end of last year, the station was rebuilt, including a new entrance concourse and step-free access to the platforms.

The long-term future for the station is however up for debate as plans for Crossrail 2 would see present SWML services diverted to Tooting Broadway (for interchange with the Northern Line) in a new tunnel. The station could either close altogether, receive far fewer services or be an additional stopping point for longer-distance commuter services.


Image sourced from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earlsfield_railway_station


Image taken by Sadiq Khan for Tooting: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sadiqkh...in/photostream


Image taken by Sadiq Khan for Tooting: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sadiqkh...in/photostream


Oystercard
Time has flown, but the end of June commemorated the 10th anniversary of the Oysercard. Whilst not the first city in the world (Hong Kong and Tokyo came six and two years earlier respectively), the payment system has been a major success and is in the process of being expanded to incorporate more stations outside of TfL’s remit. 60mn cards have now been issued to date. Further information: http://www.globalrailnews.com/2013/0...h-anniversary/


Image taken by Transport for London Press Images: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tflpres...n/photostream/


Deptford Station
Located in south-east London on the line to Greenwich, the station at Deptford is (along with London Bridge) amongst the oldest on the planet (dating back to 1836), yet despite its historical importance, the station was basic, poorly maintained and low usage. A picture of the old station structure can be found here: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...h_entrance.JPG

Fortunately the station has recently undergone a renaissance, spurred on by the trebling of ridership in the last eight years and the advancement of nearby residential projects such as Convoys Wharf. To meet future demand and modern standards, the station was given a substantial overhaul including a new concourse and ticket hall, step-free access to both platforms and a new connecting tunnel using the disused arches.

Pending surrounding development, the station renovation has factored in the potential re-use of a long disused carriageway (which allowed street-to-platform access for horse-drawn carriages) as an additional entrance.

Further pictures (including a walk-through) are available here: http://deptforddame.blogspot.co.uk/2...ion-opens.html


Image taken by Ewan-M: http://www.flickr.com/photos/5593585...in/photostream


Image taken by avail: http://www.flickr.com/photos/avail/7...in/photostream


WCML Station Upgrades
According to Network Rail (http://www.networkrailmediacentre.co...-all-1de1.aspx), work is due to commence on upgrades to Leighton Buzzard, Berkhamsted & Hemel Hempstead station including step-free access to all platforms.

All three stations are located on the West Coast Main Line, and are amongst the busiest on the stretch between Milton Keynes Central and Watford Junction. Project works should be completed by February 2014.


Image taken by psd: http://www.flickr.com/photos/psd/268...n/photostream/


Various Station Improvements
All improvement works are set to be completed by summer 2014. Following text sourced from Network Rail: http://www.networkrailmediacentre.co...Kent-1de7.aspx

Bearsted
The existing footbridge will be enhanced by installing lifts to provide step-free access to each platform.

Image taken by missarkar: http://www.flickr.com/photos/misskar...in/photostream

Bexleyheath
The existing footbridge will be enhanced by installing lifts to provide step free access to each platform.

Image taken by WillyG: http://www.flickr.com/photos/wilfgre...in/photostream

Brockley
The existing footbridge on platform 1 will be altered by installing a lift to provide step free access to London bound trains.

Image taken by Ewan-M: http://www.flickr.com/photos/5593585...in/photostream

Honor Oak Park
The existing enclosed footbridge will be altered by installing two new lifts to provide level access directly from the station booking hall and step free access to each platform.

Image taken by FHSoc: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fhsoc/7...in/photostream

New Eltham
The existing footbridge and stairs will be demolished to make way for a new footbridge and stairs together with two new lifts to provide step free access to each platform. A temporary footbridge and stairs will be installed until the work is complete.

Image taken by 3dstereopics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/stereov...in/photostream

New Cross
A new footbridge and two new lifts and a new staircase will provide step free access to each platform.

Image taken by kpmarek: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kpmarek...in/photostream

New Cross Gate
The existing staircases and elevated walkway to all platforms will be demolished to make way for a new high level walkway structure and three new lifts to provide step free access to each platform.

Image taken by flierfy: http://www.flickr.com/photos/2942358...in/photostream

Strood
A new, wider footbridge and two lifts will be provided at the end of platform 1 and on platforms 2 and 3 to provide step free access. Improvements will be made to the existing underpass to provide extra space when accessing platforms.

Image taken by Adam_Lucas: http://www.flickr.com/photos/transra...in/photostream
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  #203  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2013, 1:40 PM
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Future London Hub Airport Options
The Mayor of London has outlined three potential options for new hub airport capacity for London. The Mayor has suggested that if either option is taken forward, Heathrow would be closed and its vast site and transport connections devoted to a new London Borough housing hundreds of thousands.


Image sourced from TfL: http://www.tfl.gov.uk/assets/downloa...rt-booklet.pdf


Image sourced from TfL: http://www.tfl.gov.uk/assets/downloa...rt-booklet.pdf


Image sourced from TfL: http://www.tfl.gov.uk/assets/downloa...rt-booklet.pdf

Heathrow have (in retaliation) also unveiled their contentious options for expanding the airport and its capacity as the ‘cheapest’ option for London hub capacity expansion. Each option would raise the capacity of Heathrow from the current limit of 480,000 flights per annum to 740,000 and cater to 130mn passengers. Building a fourth runway (either the north-west or south-west option) would be unlikely to go ahead before 2040. Further detail available here: http://mediacentre.heathrowairport.c...unway-5e2.aspx

North West & South West Option

Image sourced from Heathrow Airport: http://mediacentre.heathrowairport.c...?NewsAreaId=28

South West Only Option

Image sourced from Heathrow Airport: http://mediacentre.heathrowairport.c...?NewsAreaId=28

North West Only Option

Image sourced from Heathrow Airport: http://mediacentre.heathrowairport.c...?NewsAreaId=28

North Only Option

Image sourced from Heathrow Airport: http://mediacentre.heathrowairport.c...?NewsAreaId=28


Heathrow Airport Terminal 2
Work on the new Terminal 2 at Heathrow is also nearing completion, with the building set to receive its first passengers in June 2014. Below images are of Terminal 2 workers marking one-year to go celebrations.


Image taken by @BBCTomEdwards (images sourced by woodgnome at skyscrapercity.com: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=737 @BBCTomEdwards: https://twitter.com/BBCTomEdwards


Image taken by @BBCTomEdwards (images sourced by woodgnome at skyscrapercity.com: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=737 @BBCTomEdwards: https://twitter.com/BBCTomEdwards


Image taken by (sourced by SE9 on skyscrapercity.com: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=729 John Oram: http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnora...in/photostream

On another topic, Heathrow was recently awarded two honours; first Terminal 5 designed by Richard Rogers was awarded the best airport terminal in the world by Skytrax (an international survey of 12mn air passengers across the globe), and secondly Heathrow Airport came 10th overall (a first and the highest ranking ever for the airport). With the new Terminal 2 and further developments Heathrow has turned itself around from a depressing & dated airport into a modern and top-tier aviation hub. Source: http://www.worldairportawards.com/Aw...irport2013.htm


Gatwick Airport
Currently London’s second busiest international airport and the busiest single runway airport on the planet, additional expansion of the airport has been prevented by an agreement that is set to expire in 2019. With ambitions to take on Heathrow, Gatwick’s owners have sought master planner Sir Terry Farrell to look at expansion options for the airport, including a second runway.

A big bonus in favour of Gatwick is that land is already set aside for an additional runway, with the flight corridors avoiding heavily populated areas (unlike Heathrow). In addition, Gatwick has substantial rail connections into London (the Gatwick Express, Thameslink and Brighton Main Line services).


Image sourced from London Gatwick Airport: http://gatwickbettersolution.tumblr.com

[IMG]http://image.slidesharecdn.com/gat01...lide-2-638.jpg [/IMG]
Image sourced from London Gatwick Airport: http://gatwickbettersolution.tumblr.com


Image sourced from London Gatwick Airport: http://gatwickbettersolution.tumblr.com


Image sourced from London Gatwick Airport: http://gatwickbettersolution.tumblr.com


Image taken by jkr1812: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jkr1812...in/photostream
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  #204  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2013, 3:00 PM
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A second runway at Gatwick combined with an expanded Stansted strikes me as a good option. Tho it would put the three main airports still on different rail lines.
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  #205  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2013, 4:26 PM
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Expanding Heathrow also makes sense, as it's by far the most convenient of London's airports for the majority of business travelers especially.

If you bought a house near an airport, don't complain about noise. The airport was there before most of the nearby residents, and their houses were cheaper because of it.

Closing Heathrow in favor of an airport in the estuary would be economically disastrous. The whole of west London and M4 corridor employment is tied to Heathrow. Close it, and get ready for everything from the corporate presence along the A4 in Brentford, to the logistics firms in Slough, and companies in and around Reading to close up shop and relocate.
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  #206  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2013, 11:29 AM
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It is a tricky decision that has to weigh future capacity (and capability to service emerging destinations), cost, accessibility and toll on the environment (noise and air); my preference is the Thames Gateway (Norman Foster) option as whilst the most costly, it has the greater capacity for the long-term, is in the ‘growth’ corridor of London and moves the flight paths away from populated area.

Whilst it would be on the wrong side of London for the M4 corridor, part of the Foster plan envisioned the creation of a brand new four-track bypass line around London which would ironically provide direct rail access to the airport from the west which is currently not available at Heathrow (although there have been long-term plans to rectify this).


Image source: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...&postcount=162

The ideal solution would be as follows:
- Thames Gateway airport built (150mppa+)
- Gatwick expanded with second runway and new terminal (80mppa+)
- Stansted expanded with additional runway (40mppa+)
- A potential solution as well could be to close London City and divert flights to a heavily reduced Heathrow as a ‘premium business airport’.


Gatwick Airport – Second Runway Options
Text sourced from: http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairpor...ution-80b.aspx


Image sourced from Gatwick Airport: http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairpor...&SubjectID=214

London Gatwick has identified three main options for how a southern parallel runway could be configured and operated. Full submission available here: http://www.gatwickairport.com/Public...y19Jul2013.pdf

Option 1: Dependent Segregated Mode
Close-spaced runways (with a separation less than 760m) are too close to operate independently to each other. The runways would have to be used dependently i.e. with operations on one runway temporarily interrupting the operations on the other. One runway would be used for aircraft arrivals and one for departures (a method of operation called ‘segregated mode’). This method of operation could support around 67-70 movements per hour, which could equate to an overall two runway capacity of some 60-66 million passengers per year by 2050.


Image sourced from Gatwick Airport: http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairpor...&SubjectID=214

Option 2: Independent Segregated Mode
If the runways are positioned 760m or more apart the runways can be operated independently of each other. This means that arrivals on one runway do not affect departures on the other. Capacity could increase to around 75 movements per hour equating to some 75-82 million passengers per year by 2050.


Image sourced from Gatwick Airport: http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairpor...&SubjectID=214

Option 3: Independent Mixed Mode
If the runways are at least 1,035m apart, then it can be possible to operate them in ‘independent mixed mode’. Each runway could accommodate both arriving and departing aircraft. In this way flexibility and capacity would be maximised. Capacity could amount to between 95 and 100 movements per hour or more and would equate to some 80-87 million passengers per year by 2050.


Image sourced from Gatwick Airport: http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairpor...&SubjectID=214


Image sourced from Gatwick Airport: http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairpor...&SubjectID=214


Image sourced from Gatwick Airport: http://www.gatwickairport.com/Public...y19Jul2013.pdf
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  #207  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2013, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
Expanding Heathrow also makes sense, as it's by far the most convenient of London's airports for the majority of business travelers especially.

If you bought a house near an airport, don't complain about noise. The airport was there before most of the nearby residents, and their houses were cheaper because of it.

Closing Heathrow in favor of an airport in the estuary would be economically disastrous. The whole of west London and M4 corridor employment is tied to Heathrow. Close it, and get ready for everything from the corporate presence along the A4 in Brentford, to the logistics firms in Slough, and companies in and around Reading to close up shop and relocate.
I agree with these points. Closing Heathrow? I see two cases in which it'd be the thing to do:
1. Other aiports in London expand while the number of flights doesn't go up, instead they just move away from Heathrow to such an extent that the cost of operations doesn't make sense.
2. Spare capacity at the other airports for more than what is handled at Heathrow while amazing redelopment plans are going on for the Heathrow site that'd create huge numbers of flats, offices, retail, parks, transit and so on.
Neither case is at all likely in the next several decades afaik.

IMO:
keep Heathrow going and possibly add a runway. Add a runway at Gatwick. Then build out either Stansted or Luton (Luton since it's on the MML) if capacity needs keep rising.
A brand new airport in the estuary? Would need so much new infrastructure even apart from the artificial island that I really don't see how it could make sense. The infrastructure money must have better uses elsewhere.

/I could be wrong tho, and if I am... an estuary airport could get planes away from the city. ('cept there's still LCA).
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  #208  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2013, 10:57 AM
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I don't think there will ever be a situation in which other airports add capacity and lure traffic away from Heathrow, to the extent that Heathrow becomes underutilized and shuts down. For an airline, the first choice is always Heathrow. It is simply closest to the most economically vibrant areas of London (in terms of both businesses and affluent residents).

And I'm not sure that a massive new mixed-use development which replaced Heathrow would make any sense. Businesses have located in west London because of Heathrow, and the population shift westward has followed this. The same thing happens everywhere, e.g., in Chicago, northwest suburbs like Schaumburg and Hoffman Estates became major centers for corporate headquarters with hundreds of millions of square feet of office space as a direct result of proximity to O'Hare. Perhaps there's enough critical mass in these places now that even if the airport that drew them there in the first place closes, businesses will still want to locate there, but it's far from certain.

Stansted is so far away and so inconvenient that it only makes sense for low cost carriers (as a form of consumer segmentation, for people with more spare time than money). I've never been to Luton and have no plans to. Even Gatwick is really far. All of these should have been built inside the M25, one to the south and one to the north.
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  #209  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2013, 9:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
I don't think there will ever be a situation in which other airports add capacity and lure traffic away from Heathrow, to the extent that Heathrow becomes underutilized and shuts down. For an airline, the first choice is always Heathrow. It is simply closest to the most economically vibrant areas of London (in terms of both businesses and affluent residents).

And I'm not sure that a massive new mixed-use development which replaced Heathrow would make any sense. Businesses have located in west London because of Heathrow, and the population shift westward has followed this. The same thing happens everywhere, e.g., in Chicago, northwest suburbs like Schaumburg and Hoffman Estates became major centers for corporate headquarters with hundreds of millions of square feet of office space as a direct result of proximity to O'Hare. Perhaps there's enough critical mass in these places now that even if the airport that drew them there in the first place closes, businesses will still want to locate there, but it's far from certain.

Stansted is so far away and so inconvenient that it only makes sense for low cost carriers (as a form of consumer segmentation, for people with more spare time than money). I've never been to Luton and have no plans to. Even Gatwick is really far. All of these should have been built inside the M25, one to the south and one to the north.
Historically Heathrow has been ideally located to service the West London market, but over the years London’s economic & cultural focus (and future) has been migrating eastwards. For instance the two fastest expanding boroughs in absolute and percentage terms: Newham & Tower Hamlets are located in East London. The bulk of London’s future population (an additional 2mn+ people by 2031) and job growth is also expected to be predominantly concentrated in East London where there are substantial opportunities to redevelop brown-field sites at a lower cost with good transport options not available in the west of the city. Further afield, whilst the prospects for the M4 corridor remain healthy, they are unlike those projected for the Thames Gateway.

Gatwick’s connectivity is set to increase substantially by 2018 with 18 trains per hour into Central London, and it would potentially be the easiest (planning and cost) to deliver additional capacity. Stansted meanwhile is indeed at a disadvantage due to its distance, even with the Stansted Express rail service. However should the airport experience substantial development, there have been early indications that a brand new express line would have to be built (running parallel to the M11) potentially halving journey times thereby making the airport far more appetising.

The issue also isn’t just about passengers either; a big shift in recent years has been to provide substantial interoperability between rail, road, air and sea cargo freight transfers. Heathrow is heavily limited in this aspect, but a Thames Gateway airport would be directly opposite the new London Gateway port (and connected by a new underwater rail and road connection). In addition the proposed bypass line around London would provide far greater international freight distribution avenues than is presently feasible from Heathrow.

There is also precedent within London to convert an airport into other uses; Croydon Airport was originally the premier airport for London; it has now long since been redeveloped for other uses. Granted aviation was a lot less prevalent back then, but the building of HKIA on Chek Lap Kok also illustrates that a successful wholesale move of the primary aviation hub is not only possible, but delivers substantial benefits to the city it serves.

Gatwick and Stansted would never have been built within the M25 because of insufficient space (Croydon closed to make way for Gatwick) and naturally the issue of heavily restricted development on the Green Belt which has existed since the 1930’s. Furthermore both airports existed for decades prior to their international status; Stansted for instance was a vast RAF & USAF airfield with ample space and limited restrictions to development of airport infrastructure and transport connections to Central London for one-seat rail rides. Lastly the idea of having the world’s busiest airspace over a more compact area would have been a recipe for a disaster; it’s bad enough having Heathrow and City within the city limits.
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  #210  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2013, 6:47 PM
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New York manages to make it work.

JFK and LaGuardia are only about 8.5 miles apart. Newark is 16 miles from LaGuardia and 19 miles from JFK. And then you've got Westchester County airport about 21 miles north of LaGuardia, plus all of the private jet airports.

Heathrow is 24 miles from Gatwick and 21 miles from London City. Stansted is 27 miles from London City, and obviously much farther from either Heathrow or Gatwick. Luton and Stansted are 25 miles apart, and both in the middle of absolutely nowhere.

For someone living in Central or West London, Heathrow is the only airport that's convenient to get to. Given the choice between flying out of Stansted or not going on holiday, I'd choose to stay in London, and to fly out of Gatwick I had better be going somewhere very nice.
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Old Posted Aug 8, 2013, 12:24 PM
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'New York manages to make it work'

That is a questionable statement. Based on the comprehensive Skytrax surveys of global airports, all the New York airports lag substantially behind their London counterparts. Even the budget-carrier focused London Stansted is ranked 20+ places ahead of JFK which is meant to be the international gateway to New York.

Succinctly having several large airports in close proximity to each other generates substantial concerns, including:
- A severe restriction in available flight paths to airports, creating bottlenecks and increased likelihood of delays.
- The greater possibility of conflicts, near-misses and accidents (reflected by fewer fatalities and incidents at London's airports).
- The intensification of air pollution and noise disturbance over populated urban areas.
- Restriction in future capacity growth whether due to planning hurdles, cost of more expensive/built-up land, or the aforementioned lack of available air space.

Furthermore unlike their New York counterparts, Heathrow, Gatwick, Stansted and City have one-seat rail rides from the terminal building to the city centre (and other destinations). So whilst Gatwick (as the crow flies) is over double the distance from Central London that Newark is from Midtown, you actually get to check-in at Gatwick quicker.

In reflection if the authorities were building Heathrow today, it would most certainly not be in its present location due to the concern over the Central & West London flight paths, the noise & air pollution affecting millions, the lack of available space for future expansion (and operational resilience), airspace congestion & competition with other London airports (and airfields), poor beyond-London infrastructure integration and inadequate connectivity with multi-modal freight operations (rail, sea, etc...)
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Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 9:56 AM
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'New York manages to make it work'

That is a questionable statement. Based on the comprehensive Skytrax surveys of global airports, all the New York airports lag substantially behind their London counterparts. Even the budget-carrier focused London Stansted is ranked 20+ places ahead of JFK which is meant to be the international gateway to New York.
What is this ranking meant to reflect? On-time arrivals and departures? Terminal amenities? Convenience to travelers?

I will never fly out of Stansted again, because it's simply too much of a pain to get to and saving ₤100 on a flight isn't worth it.

Heathrow is the best located airport in London. Full stop.
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Old Posted Sep 4, 2013, 1:16 PM
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What is this ranking meant to reflect? On-time arrivals and departures? Terminal amenities? Convenience to travelers? I will never fly out of Stansted again, because it's simply too much of a pain to get to and saving ₤100 on a flight isn't worth it.

Heathrow is the best located airport in London. Full stop.
The latest Skytrax survey was based on 12mn responses to 39 factors (http://www.worldairportawards.com/main/methods.htm), including: “Getting to and from the Airport, Ease of Access” and ”Public transport options, efficiency and prices”.

Heathrow is indeed the nearest airport to Central London, but that benefit is rapidly being outweighed by the substantial noise & air pollution blighting large areas of London, the ongoing concern of flight paths over Central London, and the lack of cheap and easily-developable land for future expansion.
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Old Posted Sep 4, 2013, 1:18 PM
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Crossrail
Photo update of the works around the two new eastern and western ticket halls for the Crossrail station at Tottenham Court Road.


Image taken by Crossrail: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...ub-takes-shape


Image taken by Crossrail: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...ub-takes-shape


Image taken by Crossrail: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...ub-takes-shape


Image taken by Crossrail: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...ub-takes-shape


Image taken by Crossrail: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...ub-takes-shape


Image taken by Crossrail: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...ub-takes-shape


Image taken by Crossrail: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/arti...ub-takes-shape
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Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 7:59 PM
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The London transportation system is pretty cool...
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Crossrail
As part of the London Open House event, the Crossrail station sites at Canary Wharf (on Sunday 22nd) & Liverpool Street (on Saturday 21st) will be open to the public

Canary Wharf
Pedestrian connection bridge; note the dock that the station is located in will be refilled once construction is finished.


Image taken by IanVisits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianvisi...in/photostream


Image taken by IanVisits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianvisi...in/photostream


Image taken by IanVisits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianvisi...in/photostream

Connaught Tunnel Approach

Image taken by IanVisits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianvisi...in/photostream


Southern Fleet Expansion
Train operator Southern has signed a contract with Bombardier for the delivery of an additional 116 EMU carriages which will be in service from 2015 onwards. Southern is already oncourse to roll-out 130 carriages by the end of the year and Southern will take receipt of an additional 40 carriages in the first half of 2014 (286 new carriages between now and 2015). Source: http://www.southernrailway.com/south...lectric-trains


Croxley Rail Link
After several years, approval has finally been awarded for the construction of the Croxley Rail Link which will redirect the Metropolitan Line from its present terminus at Watford to Watford Junction. The present Watford terminus will be mothballed, and the line diverted onto a disused branch line, with new stations constructed at Ascot Road and Watford Hospital; 2,700 net additional households will fall within an 800m catchment of a station on the line. The line will then join with the London Overground line from Euston at Watford High Street, before terminating at Watford Junction for various onward destinations along the WCML.

Watford is located immediately to the north-west of London and one of the fastest growing areas of London’s urban belt (population growth 12.3% over the last decade), with growth accelerating to 15% over the next decade. The line provides an alternative route into Central London should there be any problems with the WCML, creates an additional semi-orbital route and also opens up the potential for future Chiltern Railway services from the north-west utilising the line into Watford Junction.

The project cost is £116.8mn, with new services starting in 2016. Trains will run every ten minutes on the line at peak.


Image sourced from Croxley Rail Link: http://www.croxleyraillink.com

The soon-to-be disused Watford station

Image taken by Darlo2009: http://www.flickr.com/photos/darlo20...in/photostream


Image taken by Don McDougall: http://www.flickr.com/photos/donshap...in/photostream


Reading Station
Time lapse video of works across the Easter holidays earlier this year in and around Reading station, allowing for access to the new station platforms, new signalling, 5 sets of points and the commissioning of 51 switch & crossing units. Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfdxubQGfCU
Video Link



Rochester Station
Earlier this year, Network Rail unveiled initials plans to rebuild Rochester station half a kilometre up the line on the site of what is currently a car park. Rochester is a historic town located on the Medway; the station is on Chatham Main Line out of Victoria

The £26mn plan would incorporate a step-free station with three platforms capable of handling 12 carriage trains (the present station is limited to 10 carriages). The station’s relocation will also create an integrated transport interchange for the town and provide access to a major new adjacent development (Rochester Riverside) which will see the creation of 2,000 new homes. The station is anticipated to be complete by late 2015. Source: http://www.networkrail.co.uk/news/20...n-at-Rochester


Image sourced from Network Rail: http://www.networkrail.co.uk/news/20...n-at-Rochester


Oxford Station
Network Rail have appointed Aedas to look at redeveloping Oxford station which is used by 6.3mn every year. Plans to expand and enhance the station should become available later this year. Source: http://www.networkrailmediacentre.co...Oxford-station


Image taken by plualzed: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pluralz...n/photostream/


Eurostar
According to Global Rail News (http://www.globalrailnews.com/2013/0...urostar-growth), Eurostar has experienced passenger growth of 2% and revenue growth of 7% in the first six months of 2013. With ever growing demand for services, an additional 200 services now run between London & Paris. In other Eurostar news, the first batch of new Eurostar trains built by Siemens (ten Class 374) to complement the present fleet (of thirty eight Class 373 train sets) are on their way for testing. Operation of the fleet should take place in 2014.


Denmark Hill Station
With passenger use doubling in recent years and the recent arrival of London Overground, work has finally been completed on upgrading Denmark Hill station in south London. The station now has additional access to the platforms providing step-free access; the rest of the station is currently being renovated.


Image taken by Stuart Transport: http://www.flickr.com/photos/stuarts...in/photostream
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  #217  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2013, 1:55 PM
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Building King’s Cross Square
With the Western Concourse now open and the Olympics & Paralympics finally over, work to demolish the 70’s concourse has been taking place over the last few months. Once complete in the coming weeks, the area will be transformed into a new piazza providing pleasant views of the original 1850’s facade of King’s Cross.

Video Link



West Anglia Service Devolution
It has recently been announced that the West Anglia suburban rail services (currently managed by the rail franchise operator Greater Anglia) will be devolved to Transport for London. These are a collection of lines from London Liverpool Street and Stratford that are in the Lea Valley growth corridor with differing levels of service. The route up to Hertford East is anticipated to become the northern terminus of Crossrail 2.

The Mayor has been pushing to take over more of these services as the train operators typically concentrate on the longer distance commuter services from beyond London which are more lucrative. Unfortunately a similar approach to taking over Southeastern’s lines into Dartford in south-east London was unsuccessful, however if a similar ‘Overground’ renaissance occurs on the West Anglia routes, it could lead to the Mayor gaining control over other commuter routes. Source: http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/medi...tro/28216.aspx


Image source from Greater Anglia: http://www.greateranglia.co.uk/trave...ng/network-map


Gospel Oak-Barking Line Electrification and Extension
Sometimes referred to as the GOBLIN (Gospel Oak to Barking LINe), the GOBLIN is a twelve station orbital railway in north-east London running from Gospel Oak in north London to Barking in the east. The lines’ location and deviation from primary population centres, and the lines’ use by freight services bypassing the North London Line has historically led to the route becoming neglected and poorly used.

Hastening its problems was the absence of interchanges; with the exception of the terminating stations at either end of the line, the only direct interchange with another line is with the Victoria at Blackhorse Road. The GOBLIN lacks interchanges with the Northern, East Coast Main Line, Piccadilly, Lea Valley Lines, West Anglia Main Line, Chingford Branch, Central, and Great Eastern Main Line, despite crossing all of these lines at some point along its route.


Image sourced from TfL: http://www.tfl.gov.uk/gettingaround/9444.aspx

Fortunately when ownership of the line was transferred to the London Overground in 2007, TfL made substantial improvements to the route, including heavily renovated (clean, safe and accessible) stations which led to an almost instant increase in ridership; stations such as Harringay Green Lanes and Leytonstone High Road experienced a tenfold increase in usage in less than a year. Since 2007, ridership growth has remained positive and is now constrained by the trains operating on the route.

When TfL gained control of the route, the old trains were ditched; however unlike the rest of the Overground network, the GOBLIN is not electrified meaning that TfL had to acquire diesel trains (two carriage class 172 units). The internal seating layout also differs from other Overground rolling stock (it isn’t longitudinal).


Image taken by tompagenet: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tompage...in/photostream

Back in June it was announced that funds (£90mn) would be made available to electrify the line and allow for the GOBLIN to source new electric rolling stock. In addition the line would be extended south-eastwards from the present terminus at Barking on a new route to a new station at Barking Riverside (a major redeveloped site); whether this is a single station or several has yet to be ascertained, but it could link in with the proposed Dagenham Dock Extension on the DLR. Source: http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/medi...tro/28216.aspx


S-Stock Rollout
Following in the wake of delivery of the new unified S-Stock to the Metropolitan and Hammersmith & City Lines, the Circle Line has now received its first new train (http://www.globalrailnews.com/2013/0...to-circle-line). Delivery of the new trains will commence on the District Line next year.


Paperless Ticket Expansion
Whilst London’s Oyster card is ubiquitous for all public transport across London (Underground, Overground, National Rail, DLR, tram, buses and river), its use on the National Rail lines beyond the remit of Transport for London has been limited. Instead many commuters heading into London (and then using the London transport network) rely upon paper travelcards (or annual passes) with a magnetic strip on the reverse.

c2c – a relatively self-contained but busy 28 station commuter network out of London Fenchurch Street – is looking to upgrade towards paperless ticketing as part of a pilot project from April next year (http://www.globalrailnews.com/2013/0...the-south-east). The Government are then keen on deploying the platform across the South East region by the end of 2015.

Meanwhile other operators such as Southern have also launched their own paperless card (http://www.globalrailnews.com/2013/0...keting-service), however as the below map illustrates, it is focused only on lines beyond London and thus of limited use for London-bound commuters. This issue is caused by a compatibility problem with London’s Oyster cards (and ticket barriers) and the ITSO format advocated by the Government; fortunately the issue is set to be resolved by the end of next year creating a seamless transport experience across London and its surrounding areas.


Image sourced from Southern Railway: https://www.southernrailway.com/smart-card


Bluebell Railway
The Beeching cuts in the post-WW2 era led to a rationalisation of the railway network with many loss making or underutilised (predominantly rural) rail lines being culled from passenger service. Some question whether closing various lines and stations was a prudent action; yet it should be highlighted that railway travel at the time was declining with the advent of greater automobile ownership. Nowadays the picture is completely different and despite a heavily reduced rail network and far fewer stations, the system is close to carrying as many people as it did at its peak over 50 years ago.

There is even momentum in many circles to bring many of these disused routes back into action (a topic I will come back to in a later post); fortunately many former commercial routes which pepper the rural landscape of Britain have now been converted into heritage lines.

One such line, the Bluebell Railway operates a 18km stretch of track across East & West Sussex; the line originally opened for commercial service in 1882, closed in 1958, but was reopened in 1960 as a heritage railway and is considered the oldest heritage railway line open to the public in the world.

Over the decades the line has gradually been expanded, with the line being extended to East Grinstead earlier this year, allowing for passengers to transfer from the National Rail platforms over to the heritage line platform. The Railway Engineer recently had an interesting article on the railway and its extension: http://www.therailengineer.com/2013/...-dig-completed


Image taken by Articdriver: http://www.flickr.com/photos/articdr...in/photostream


Crossrail 2
The government has put its backing behind feasibility studies of Crossrail 2 which is the first step towards working out a route and the cost. Source: http://www.globalrailnews.com/2013/0...t-firm-backing


Croydon Tramlink
It was recently announced (http://www.globalrailnews.com/2013/0...obahn-vehicles) that TfL would seek an additional four trams from Stadler; Croydon recently took on six new trams of the same design from Stadler.


Image taken by simonz.photoz: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sjdavis...in/photostream
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  #218  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2013, 2:03 PM
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London Overground
The foundation of the London Overground project was to create a modern and frequent orbital rail service around London to provide relief on the lines into Central London. Back in 2007 line ridership was a reasonable 33mn, but the introduction of high capacity trains in 2009, and then the doubling of train frequencies in 2011 led to unprecedented demand and ridership has since quadrupled to 120mn journeys as of last year.

With line usage set to continue growing in the coming years (10% per annum), TfL are planning to increase the length of trains (from four to five carriages) and extend platforms and support infrastructure. The first extended trains will begin to rollout at the end of this year. Source: http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/proj...mes/27141.aspx


Image taken by [J Z A] Photography: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jza_pho...in/photostream


High Speed ‘Rail Bagel’
Not a confirmed project by any means, but the transport advisor (Isabel Dedring) to the mayor has suggested that whilst the orbital nature of the London Overground network goes someway to relieving the strain on Central London, when combined with the stratospheric population increase (London is set to grow by around 100,000 per annum over the next two decades), a new orbital line in Outer London would be required. Such a line would be London’s third orbital rail route with Central London having the Circle Line, Inner London the Overground and Outer London the ‘rail bagel’. Ms Dedring will publish a long-term infrastructure plan next year which could look at such a project in further detail. Source: http://www.globalrailnews.com/2013/0...eed-rail-bagel


London Waterloo International
Designed by Grimshaw, the five platforms at Waterloo International were opened in 1994 to coincide with the arrival of Eurostar services from the continent via the Channel Tunnel. They were however only a temporary measure (trains took up valuable space on slow commuter lines) until the construction of what is now referred to as HS1 and the modernisation of London St Pancras which was completed in 2007. Since then the distinctive ‘worm’-like platforms have been mothballed due to the length (capable of handling 400m+ trains) and other infrastructure integration complications.

However with rail use set to continue growing and the adjacent Waterloo experiencing rapid passenger growth (up 7.6mn in the last two years), there is unprecedented demand for additional platforms to cope with longer and more frequent trains. Furthermore South West Trains which is the operator of commuter and longer distance services from London Waterloo has an annual ridership of 210mn, which is set to nearly double to 380mn by 2030; the majority of destinations being within London.

Platform 20 is already on course to being brought back into use in the coming months, but it has now been announced (http://networkrailmediacentre.co.uk/...t-fo-1e45.aspx) that the remaining four platforms will be brought back into use as part of a wider project of platform extension and new trains.

South West Trains is also looking to acquire up to 250 new carriages by mid 2017 to support passenger growth. Source: http://www.globalrailnews.com/2013/0...in-procurement


Image taken by Tristan Appleby: http://www.flickr.com/photos/1488076...in/photostream


Thameslink
Skyscrapercity.com forum member mackenziesoley (http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1106) has been keeping up to date with various developments on Thameslink (the north-south high-capacity line through London);
• First train in service December 2015
• First 100 carriages in service May 2016
• Last train delivered June 2018
• Thameslink stock is class 700
• 700’s will take 2 years and 7 months to be delivered
• KO2 infrastructure completed January 2018
• Thameslink peak services increases from today’s 16tph to 20tph in May 2018
• 24tph is December 2018
• Part of the delay in new trains is down to depot planning issues
• All parties underestimated how complex deal was, hence the delay.
• Banks are confident in Siemens ability to deliver

Blackfriars Station
After several years, the finishing touches have now been applied to Blackfriars; a station that dates back to 1870, but has been rebuilt to span the River Thames as part of the Thameslink project to cope with 24tph in each direction.

The station has four platforms (two through and two terminating) and two primary entrances on the north and south banks of the Thames; it will provide good views of London due to its rather unique location.


Image taken by mattbuck4950: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mattbuc...in/photostream


Image taken by mattbuck4950: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mattbuc...in/photostream


Image taken by Green, Cream & Tangerine livery: http://www.flickr.com/photos/4580146...in/photostream

London Bridge
Extensive work has also begun on rebuilding London Bridge station; a major station in London that will allow for higher train throughput and a new street-level concourse


Image taken by Keltbray: http://www.flickr.com/photos/keltbra...in/photostream


Image sourced from Network Rail: http://www.networkrailmediacentre.co...ation-unveiled

Canal Tunnels
Constructed back in 2006 as part of the new St Pancras Thameslink station, Network Rail have commenced work to install track, signalling, power & safety systems in the Canal Tunnels which run under the King’s Cross Central development. Once work is complete, trains from the East Coast Main Line will be diverted into the tunnels and onto the Thameslink route. This will allow for the route to operate at 24tph in 2018 and free capacity at King’s Cross for longer distance terminating train services. Source: http://networkrailmediacentre.co.uk/...east-1e72.aspx


Image taken by Network Rail: http://networkrailmediacentre.co.uk/...east-1e72.aspx


Image taken by Network Rail: http://networkrailmediacentre.co.uk/...east-1e72.aspx


New Bus 4 London
The next two routes to be converted across to the NB4L will be routes 9 (Hammersmith to Aldwych) and 390 (Notting Hill Gate to Archway) by the end of this year. The 24 (Pimlico to Hampstead Heath) was the first route to be transferred across to the new buses earlier in the summer, whilst the 11 (Liverpool Street to Fulham Broadway) is to become a NB4L route this month. Source: http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/medi...tre/28366.aspx

Unlike most other cities, the controversial but unique double-decker bus has two staircases and three sets of doors, of which the rear is open (closed off-peak) allowing passengers to ‘hop-on’/’hop-off’ a bus regardless if it is at a stop or not. The hybrid buses (designed by Heatherwick Studio, the team behind the 2010 British pavilion in Shanghai and the 2012 Olympic Cauldron) harks back to the era of the old Routemaster bus (currently found on heritage bus routes through London) that is a classic image of London.

600 buses have been ordered, which would account for around circa 8% of the London Bus fleet.


Image taken by Stuart Transport: http://www.flickr.com/photos/stuarts...in/photostream


Image taken by balmed1: http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidba...in/photostream
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Old Posted Sep 12, 2013, 3:03 PM
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Originally Posted by nito View Post
The latest Skytrax survey was based on 12mn responses to 39 factors (http://www.worldairportawards.com/main/methods.htm), including: “Getting to and from the Airport, Ease of Access” and ”Public transport options, efficiency and prices”.

Heathrow is indeed the nearest airport to Central London, but that benefit is rapidly being outweighed by the substantial noise & air pollution blighting large areas of London, the ongoing concern of flight paths over Central London, and the lack of cheap and easily-developable land for future expansion.
It doesn't matter. People who have a lot of influence will continue to prefer Heathrow to any other airport in London. And people who bought homes in the flight paths around Heathrow knew what they were getting - just like homeowners around O'Hare, LaGuardia, or any other major airport. Most of their 12mn survey responders are probably not frequent flyers, and so their opinions aren't of much relevance.

They will not close Heathrow. London's other airports, even Gatwick, are simply too far away.

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New Bus 4 London
The next two routes to be converted across to the NB4L will be routes 9 (Hammersmith to Aldwych) and 390 (Notting Hill Gate to Archway) by the end of this year.
Cool. These are my buses. I don't suppose they're actually hop-on/hop-off?
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  #220  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2013, 9:33 AM
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It doesn't matter. People who have a lot of influence will continue to prefer Heathrow to any other airport in London. And people who bought homes in the flight paths around Heathrow knew what they were getting - just like homeowners around O'Hare, LaGuardia, or any other major airport. Most of their 12mn survey responders are probably not frequent flyers, and so their opinions aren't of much relevance.

They will not close Heathrow. London's other airports, even Gatwick, are simply too far away.
People prefer Heathrow at the moment because it offers unparalleled hub options; it has also made substantial improvements in recent years making it one of the best airports in the world. The ongoing concern is Heathrow’s confined location inhibiting its ability to expand, to access new markets and increase the hub aspect of the airport that makes it the preferred airport for many in the first place.

Many ‘influential’ people in West London will undoubtedly be affected if Heathrow is allowed to build two additional runways because it will increase the threshold and intensity of noise and air pollution across London. Let alone the ongoing risk of an incident with a plane on approach to Heathrow.

A brand new fully purpose built international hub airport in the Thames Estuary solves so many issues that afflict Heathrow (noise & air pollution, delays, congestion, capacity growth constraints, new international links, 24/7 operation, freight links, greater connectivity to London and the surrounding regions, redevelopment of Heathrow, etc...) that it is rapidly becoming a no-brainer. Furthermore Ebbsfleet as it stands is only 18mins from Central London (for comparison Heathrow T5 is 21mins), so potential journey times from a Thames Estuary airport to Central London by rail would only be slightly longer than at present, but with overwhelming benefits.

I don’t believe the Skytrax surveys discriminate against frequent or infrequent, business or leisure flyers; regardless the quality of an airport isn’t defined by how many times a person may fly, it is defined by how good it is for a first time visitor or a frequent flyer.

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Cool. These are my buses. I don't suppose they're actually hop-on/hop-off?
Yes, but only at peak when a conductor is present (for safety reasons at night); I have yet to go on one yet.
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