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  #41  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 6:25 PM
bomberjet bomberjet is offline
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Totally agree esquire.
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  #42  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 6:59 PM
TimeFadesAway TimeFadesAway is offline
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
I think the baby boomers are by and large a total writeoff when it comes to their perceptions about downtown.
It's a shame, really. My parents and my in-laws all live in our building (yes, ha ha). And they all absolutely love living downtown. My father-in-law (a Croatian immigrant) walks to the Millennium Library daily to sit and read. My mom, one of the more negative people I've come across in my life, raves about living downtown to anyone who will listen.

Living downtown is perhaps as, if not more, suitable for a retired baby boomer than anyone else. It's a shame most are too close minded to consider it.
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  #43  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 8:09 PM
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Agreed. As with other areas in need of development, the key is to attract more younger professionals to the city, as well as retaining others. Renewal can only be fueled by demand. I still argue the Sherbrook Inn needs to be redeveloped sooner than later.
The fact that in Manitoba you can now get 60% of your tuition back for staying is (anecdotally) making a huge difference. In comparing my siblings' era (80s babies) who almost all left to Toronto, Vancouver, etc after university, it seems the 90s babies are now way more inclined to stay, and I think the tuition refund is a huge incentive.

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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
I think the baby boomers are by and large a total writeoff when it comes to their perceptions about downtown. They're old enough to remember the "glory days" and all they can see is how far things have fallen since Portage Avenue was the place to go for shopping, movies, dining, etc. They are completely soured on downtown... among my coworkers, it's that cohort that tends to avoid downtown as much as they possibly can, and zips back out to Lorette, Charleswood or West St. Paul as fast as they can after work.
While I think that is probably true for some, there's a lot that are reconsidering. I never thought my parents would go downtown (they said that) and now they're saying when they sell the house in a few years they want an apartment either downtown or in the Village. Their view on downtown has shifted dramatically in the last 2-3 years. And a lot of their friends see it the same way. They don't want to have 2 cars, and would rather be able to walk for what they need. My guess is that maybe the boomers who live in the more established, central burbs (river heights, west end, st. b, riverview, etc.) are more incline to move downtown because they're used to being close to it, while out in the newer burbs people are less inclined to move more central.
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  #44  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 8:14 PM
Urban recluse Urban recluse is offline
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One housing option not being developed, which I see to the contrary in other cities, are town homes. For people who want at the very least a small yard, not a condo, there are no options. I would like to see brownstone-like units built around Waterfront for starters.

Great project in Omaha:

http://omahaurbanliving360.com/downt...-at-soma-omaha
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  #45  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 8:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Urban recluse View Post
One housing option not being developed, which I see to the contrary in other cities, are town homes. For people who want at the very least a small yard, not a condo, there are no options. I would like to see brownstone-like units built around Waterfront for starters.
Yeah, Heritage Landing (300 Assiniboine) are the only ones, and they were $500k+ IIRC.
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  #46  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 8:50 PM
bomberjet bomberjet is offline
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^You might be thinking dCondo Buzz. 300 ass are rental apartments. Or is the townhouse portion for sale?
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  #47  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 9:21 PM
TimeFadesAway TimeFadesAway is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban recluse View Post
One housing option not being developed, which I see to the contrary in other cities, are town homes. For people who want at the very least a small yard, not a condo, there are no options. I would like to see brownstone-like units built around Waterfront for starters.
We used to have them throughout downtown, even in the Waterfront area (while it was still a railway line). The place depicted in the link below was at the NE corner of James and Louise. It was demolished when Lilly was extended south to James for access to the new Disraeli Freeway at the end of the '50s/early '60s.

https://digital.library.yorku.ca/yul...-rupert-avenue
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  #48  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 9:29 PM
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^ James and Lily?

Not sure where Louise Street is (or was)?
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  #49  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 9:33 PM
Urban recluse Urban recluse is offline
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Absolutely beautiful.
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  #50  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 10:01 PM
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^ James and Lily?

Not sure where Louise Street is (or was)?
Louise originally ran North from Market to Rupert and is gone now (because of the Centennial Project). This row housing was removed in the late '50s when the original access to Disraeli was created. In order to access the 'freeway' from northbound Main, you would turn right (east) onto James (now Steinkopf Gardens). Then you would turn left (north) onto Lily (which had been extended south from where it used to end at Pacific). The Lily extension basically goes through where the western half of this building stood.

The whole Disraeli access was re-engineered to accommodate the Centennial Project in the late '60s. Louise was eliminated, and Lily was further extended south to Market.

Off topic and kinda boring, I know!
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  #51  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 10:10 PM
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  #52  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 10:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimeFadesAway View Post
Louise originally ran North from Market to Rupert and is gone now (because of the Centennial Project). This row housing was removed in the late '50s when the original access to Disraeli was created. In order to access the 'freeway' from northbound Main, you would turn right (east) onto James (now Steinkopf Gardens). Then you would turn left (north) onto Lily (which had been extended south from where it used to end at Pacific). The Lily extension basically goes through where the western half of this building stood.

The whole Disraeli access was re-engineered to accommodate the Centennial Project in the late '60s. Louise was eliminated, and Lily was further extended south to Market.

Off topic and kinda boring, I know!
I bit off topic, but not boring. This kind of stuff is great.

Thanks for the map Urban Recluse as well.

That style of row housing with brick exterior walls (had it not been knocked down), would likely have been robust enough to survive and be rehabilitated into really great housing today.

Really unfortunate it was lost along the way.
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  #53  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 10:27 PM
Urban recluse Urban recluse is offline
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It truly is fascinating what used to be.
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  #54  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 10:39 PM
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^ Yeah, wow, that area where the East Exchange runs into South PD was such an interesting little warren of streets back in the day.
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  #55  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 11:31 PM
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This is probably all kinds of radical, but shouldn't townhouses be the predominant kind of house in... towns? Detached single family homes have their places, and that would be ranches, and farms, and cape cod, and wherever else their names suggest, but not in towns.

At this point, between zoning and fire codes, I'm sure traditional townhouses are all but illegal to build. Most that have been built in the last 50 have either been high-end condos or in isolated, homogeneous--usually subsidized--pocket neighborhoods, which doesn't do their reputation any favors. It's a shame, because they make fine places for people who like a yard or need space for children, without sacrificing the density that supports good transit and convenient amenities.
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  #56  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2016, 11:53 PM
Urban recluse Urban recluse is offline
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Last edited by Urban recluse; Mar 9, 2016 at 1:50 AM.
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  #57  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2016, 3:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by esquire View Post
I think the baby boomers are by and large a total writeoff when it comes to their perceptions about downtown. They're old enough to remember the "glory days" and all they can see is how far things have fallen since Portage Avenue was the place to go for shopping, movies, dining, etc. They are completely soured on downtown... among my coworkers, it's that cohort that tends to avoid downtown as much as they possibly can, and zips back out to Lorette, Charleswood or West St. Paul as fast as they can after work.
I feel like there's a select group of boomers who are moving back into urban neighbourhoods close to downtown, but maybe not quite downtown. Quite a few of my parents friends (boomers) are downsizing and heading to the east exchange (arts patron types), Tache, and even Osborne (all from the suburbs). This is great to see.
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  #58  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2016, 6:34 AM
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bomberjet I'm pretty sure the tower is apartments and the townhouses condo. Could be wrong though.

Also, doesn't Bridgwater have a ton of townhouses? Funny that it's happening in the most far-flung 'burbs and not in the core. I visited my buddy in Saskatoon 3 years ago and there were entire new subdivisions that were all townhouses. And they had really nice decorative street lighting. Not huge unpainted basic poles.

Side note, has anyone else noticed that the City/Hydro/BIZ (?) in West Broadway seems to do an AWFUL job of keeping the street lights working. I think probably half of them on Sherbrook and Broadways are burnt out, broken, or actually missing the entire light fixture. Weird since they just redid all the signs.
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  #59  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2016, 1:59 AM
Urban recluse Urban recluse is offline
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184 Sherbrook. It looks pretty decent.


https://twitter.com/brent_bellamy?re...Ctwgr%5Eauthor
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  #60  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2016, 2:21 AM
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As an infill developer I would love to build townhomes in or near downtown
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