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  #21  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 5:34 PM
balletomane balletomane is offline
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If all those communities reach 5,000 in a decade or so, the province better get on that project to build interchanges on the south Perimeter.

Most of the city's growth has been on the south end but if there are another 5+ communities south of the Perimeter experiencing rapid growth like that it will really add to the traffic issues.
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  #22  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 6:17 PM
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
If all those communities reach 5,000 in a decade or so, the province better get on that project to build interchanges on the south Perimeter.

Most of the city's growth has been on the south end but if there are another 5+ communities south of the Perimeter experiencing rapid growth like that it will really add to the traffic issues.
There are already some pretty significant safety concerns at deacons corner and the 207 to lorette. Most of the day its fine, but at peak times the road is treacherous and congested
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  #23  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 6:44 PM
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Don't forget Niverville. It is probably over 5000 by now
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  #24  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 6:49 PM
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Winkler and Morden, like many southern Manitoba towns and cities, are growing, but my impression is that there isn't all that much of interest being built in them. Just a lot of housing subdivisions and metal-sided industrial buildings. Maybe a bit of retail and institutional.

That's not a knock on those places... if anything, they deserve credit for finding ways to prosper. But they're all still small towns at heart.
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  #25  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 10:00 PM
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[QUOTE=dennis;7887682]Don't forget Niverville. It is probably over 5000 by now[/QUOTE]


Population of Manitoba Towns and Cities (excluding Winnipeg):

1. Brandon 48,324
2. Steinbach 14,753 (+15.3%)
3. Winkler 14,311 (+16.6%)
4. Portage la Prairie 12,979
5. Thompson 12,878
6. Selkirk 9,839
7. Dauphin 8,095
8. Morden 7,907
9. The Pas 5,368
10. Flin Flon 4,791
11. Stonewall 4,644
12. Oakbank 4,604 (+32.5%)
13. Altona 4,167
14. Niverville 4,083 (+26.6%)
15. Swan River 3,964
16. Neepawa 3,939 (+26.6%)
17. Virden 3,082
18. Carman 2,980
19. Lorette 2,904 (+23.0%)
20. Beausejour 2,895
21. Mitchell 2,523 (+31.7%)
22. Gimli 2,246
23. Minnedosa 2,178
24. Killarney 2,150
25. Ste.Anne 2,114 (+30.0%)
26. Cross Lake IR 2,018 (+103.6%)
27. Souris 1,876
28. Stony Mountain 1,800
29. Morris 1,714
30. Carberry 1,682
31. Grunthal 1,680
32. Blumenort 1,675 (+19.3%)
33. Boissevain 1,656
34. Roblin 1,614
35. La Salle 1.589
36. Ile Des Chenes 1,528 (+25.1%)

37. Shilo CFB 1,419
38. Russell 1,395
39. St.Adolphe 1,362 (+21.9%)
40. Pinawa 1,331
41. Rivers 1,257
42. Landmark 1,237
43. Moose Lake 1,225 (+14.3%)
44. Arborg 1,222
45. St-Pierre-Jolys 1,170
46. Teulon 1,095
47. Lac Du Bonnet 1,089
48. Oak Bluff 1,051 (+80.9%)
49. St.Theresa Point 1,038
50. Gilliam 1,036

*towns in the Winnipeg CMA are highlighted

source: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-re...46&CMA=0&CSD=0

Last edited by Jets4Life; Aug 9, 2017 at 9:28 AM.
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  #26  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 10:28 PM
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I find that the way Statistics Canada defines urban areas for smaller communities a bit odd, in many cases, such as Morden and Niverville, parts of the community are not included in the population centre.

Morden has a population of 8,668, but has an urban area of 7,907.
Niverville has a population of 4,610, but has an urban area of 4,083.
But, in Winkler's case, Reinfeld, which is separated by 1 mile from the city is included in it's urban area, increasing its population from 12,591 to 14,311.

In the cases of Morden and Niverville, it would be like not including St. Norbert in Winnipeg's urban area because it is separated from the rest of the city by the Perimeter Highway.
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  #27  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 11:23 PM
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
I find that the way Statistics Canada defines urban areas for smaller communities a bit odd, in many cases, such as Morden and Niverville, parts of the community are not included in the population centre.

Morden has a population of 8,668, but has an urban area of 7,907.
Niverville has a population of 4,610, but has an urban area of 4,083.
But, in Winkler's case, Reinfeld, which is separated by 1 mile from the city is included in it's urban area, increasing its population from 12,591 to 14,311.

In the cases of Morden and Niverville, it would be like not including St. Norbert in Winnipeg's urban area because it is separated from the rest of the city by the Perimeter Highway.
Statistics Canada is known to undercount. That is why I left Winnipeg's city population out of the equation. The estimate for July 1,2017 is Winnipeg should have 750,000 people, with 828,000 in the CMA. Interestingly, Headingley, which is one of the fastest growing "municipalities" has a population of 3,579 people. Places like Stonewall, Stony Mountain, and Selkirk are not included in the Winnipeg CMA, while the Brokenhead IR and Grand Marais are included in Winnipeg's population.
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  #28  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 11:27 PM
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And those numbers are already more than a year old
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  #29  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 11:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Jets4Life View Post
The estimate for July 1,2017 is Winnipeg should have 750,000 people, with 828,000 in the CMA.
I wonder if the city will revise its population forecast once again?

Originally the 1 million mark was expected to be reached in 2033, then 2035.
Currently the CMA is 15,000 residents larger than what was anticipated in the last growth forecast.
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  #30  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 12:28 AM
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
I wonder if the city will revise its population forecast once again?

Originally the 1 million mark was expected to be reached in 2033, then 2035.
Currently the CMA is 15,000 residents larger than what was anticipated in the last growth forecast.

The population projections have been revised, and I've noticed it is always heading in an upwards trajectory. In other words, the city is growing faster than it was anticipating for the last decade. The 750,000 estimation for 2017 was higher than originally projected, so if anything, the year we are projected to hit 1,000,000 residents would be moved ahead.

Last edited by Jets4Life; Aug 9, 2017 at 1:13 AM.
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  #31  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 3:31 PM
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Does anyone know why Portage la Prairie seems to lag in population growth compared to other rural cities? It seems that the city gets a bad reputation, but I've never really understood why, other than that "Portage is gross".

One would think that its relative proximity to Winnipeg and location on the Trans-Canada would put it in a good place for growth, but it really falls behind Steinbach, Winkler and Morden.
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  #32  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 3:51 PM
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^ A lot of the southern Manitoba boomtowns appear to have the large Mennonite demographic in common... Portage doesn't have that.
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  #33  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 9:16 PM
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
Does anyone know why Portage la Prairie seems to lag in population growth compared to other rural cities? It seems that the city gets a bad reputation, but I've never really understood why, other than that "Portage is gross".

One would think that its relative proximity to Winnipeg and location on the Trans-Canada would put it in a good place for growth, but it really falls behind Steinbach, Winkler and Morden.
You can make an even bigger case for Selkirk, which is closer to Winnipeg. Being on the river, and noticing how the area between Winnipeg and Selkirk has developed so much over the last 30 years, you would think Selkirk would reap the benefits of an increased population base within driving distance. Yet, the population has remained stagnant since the 70s at 10,000 people.

I guess people in the West St Paul and Southern part of St Andrews municipalities are strictly commuters to Winnipeg. I guess most residents of Selkirk work and live in the city, and don't make the commute to Winnipeg.

Last edited by Jets4Life; Aug 9, 2017 at 9:56 PM.
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  #34  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 9:47 PM
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You can make an even bigger case for Selkirk, which is closer to Winnipeg. Being on the river, and noticing how the area between Winnipeg and Selkirk has developed so much over the last 30 years, you would think Selkirk would reap the benefits of an increased population base within driving distance.

I guess people in the West St Paul and Southern part of St Andrews municipalities are strictly commuters to Winnipeg. I guess most residents of Selkirk work and live in the city, and don't make the commute to Winnipeg.
Selkirk is a dump. Plain amd simple. Portage has been on the losing end for decades. When the base shut down that hurt them a lot.
Between the two though. Portage is a much cleaner and well run city. Selkirk however isn't run very well at all.
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  #35  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 9:57 PM
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^ A lot of the southern Manitoba boomtowns appear to have the large Mennonite demographic in common... Portage doesn't have that.
Germans are hard workers in general, especially Mennonites. We need more of them in Manitoba.
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  #36  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 10:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Bluenote View Post
Selkirk is a dump. Plain amd simple. Portage has been on the losing end for decades. When the base shut down that hurt them a lot.
Between the two though. Portage is a much cleaner and well run city. Selkirk however isn't run very well at all.
At least both cities seem to be showing a bit of a turnaround as of late.
It would be great to see Selkirk cleaned up and experience a bit of a boom, and become the Steinbach of the North.

It would also be nice so see Portage grow to 25,000 or so, but that seems unlikely in the near future.
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  #37  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2017, 3:37 AM
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
At least both cities seem to be showing a bit of a turnaround as of late.
It would be great to see Selkirk cleaned up and experience a bit of a boom, and become the Steinbach of the North.

It would also be nice so see Portage grow to 25,000 or so, but that seems unlikely in the near future.
Honestly I have no idea why everyone wants places to grow. More people. More issues. If you all need people. Move to Toronto or Vancouver.
I'm not saying not grow at all. But doubling in size is pushing it. We have horrid highways. And you want more people to make them even worse. I go through PLP at least 2 times a week. The traffic on the highway is overloaded already. Let alone add more.

The one thing I enjoy about the prairies is the fact you can drive to another town or city. Am doing actually feel like you left one and then drove a distance and entered another. In Toronto. It's just one long endless city.
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  #38  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2017, 2:01 PM
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More people, means more tax dollars. As long as that is managed properly, it's a win for everyone. Speaking to Winnipeg, that means preventing endless sprawl and bringing people to live downtown. These smaller rural towns are getting a cash infusions from new residents. So again, it helps everyone if it's managed properly.
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  #39  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2017, 1:45 AM
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I recall as a kid how small Oak Bluff was. In the 80s, it could not have had over 100 people. Now it is well over 1,000 after it nearly doubled in populations from 2011-16.
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  #40  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 10:17 AM
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Morden plans to begin offering free internet service to it's residents later this year. Should be an interesting first for Canada and I imagine other communities will soon follow suit if successful.

https://www.google.ru/amp/s/globalne...residents/amp/
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