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  #81  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 10:07 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
NYC is about as global a city in terms of demographics as you can find but yeah Southeast Asians are a group with little visible presence. East Africans are another.
This is probably because people from those ethnic backgrounds were more likely to come to the U.S. through refugee programs.
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  #82  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 10:56 PM
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I'm sure people adjust. If you go to really big ethnically diverse big cities like Chicago, NYC, or Toronto (yes, I know all three are less cold than Minni), you'll see no one batting an eye at black or brown people dressed in their winter scarves and boots headed off the work on a chilly winter morning, or assuming that someone can handle less cold because of where their ancestors came from.

In fact, even towns and cities in Arctic Canada (though tiny in number) is getting some (really small, but present) amount of immigrants from places like the Philippines and India, as Canada attempts to get more people to settle the north and spread around immigrants so they don't centralize into only big crowded cities.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north...lism-1.1260176
Their kids are from Chicago and genetics have no play in that - but those who moved here from warmer climes, well they remember warmer climes. My mom complained about the winter for nearly 60yrs after moving up here from Memphis.
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  #83  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2019, 2:26 AM
Shawn Shawn is offline
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I would imagine Detroit has, by far, the largest Japanese automotive expat population. Every Japanese automotive supplier/engineering concern is in Detroit. Novi, MI has a huge Japanese infrastructure, from Japanese signage in the hospital, to a Japanese school, to a bunch of restaurants and stores. The Detroit airport even has announcements in Japanese.

The vast majority of auto jobs are with the suppliers and engineering concerns, not the car companies themselves.
I wouldn't doubt that when you add the entire metro up, there are more expat Japanese in Detroit than anywhere else in the Midwest. But I've been told repeatedly by Honda counterparts that Dublin has the highest concentration. I could see that too; there are entire subdivisions in Dublin that are ~50% Japanese expats. Multiple language schools for kids to go to on the weekend. Wholesale importers working with major sogo sosha / trading companies. All the daily life infrastructure you'd find in the other major expat Japanese communities (Singapore comes to mind).

And it all just stood out so much more because Dublin, while definitely a nice place, is still just a run-of-the-mill suburb of less than 50,000. The Japanese presence is that much more visible.
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  #84  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2019, 2:36 AM
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Historically speaking, Japan has always tended to see those who go overseas as "betraying" Japanese culture to some extent - which is why for example the Japanese Brazilians who have moved back to Japan have not been embraced. This stands in contrast to the Chinese, who will continue to accept people as being ethnically Chinese even if they're from families who have lived abroad for centuries.
Totally true, unless - and this is a big "unless" - the returnee / nikkei / kikokushijo is already successful abroad. Then Japan enthusiastically embraces the nikkei like a conquering hero. And my industry will find a way to plaster said nikkei's face on every product imaginable. Like Naomi Osaka. It's the height of hypocrisy.

My wife is a kikokushijo and she basically hates Japan. Except the food. I'm with her on that one; you can clock Japanese culture for a lot of things, but food is not one of them. I couldn't go back to life without grilled salmon and miso for Saturday breakfast.
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  #85  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2019, 7:18 AM
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In Florida, I think Orlando has a sizable Filipino community. Miami never did have a large community of any Asian group.
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  #86  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2019, 10:15 PM
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The last time I visited was a few years ago. I take an interest in Indian stuff and notice if I see Indian shops and commercial areas.

Again, it's not that there are no Indians in LA. It's just that there are a lot fewer than in NY and the Bay Area.

The only significant retail area that I'm aware of is Pioneer Blvd in Artesia. That's actually a pretty impressive Indian street, to the point where I wonder how they can even maintain it with a small South Asian population. But outside of Pioneer Blvd I haven't seen anything other than a random shop here or there. And I didn't see a lot of South Asians compared to other groups. In fact very few.

Contrast that with the South Bay (in the Bay Area) where Indians are one of the main population groups, or with NY and NJ where they rival East Asians in numbers.
LA's S. Asian community is fairly small for a major metropolitan area and also seems to be very spread out rather than concentrated in one area other than Artesia. Even San Diego seems to have larger community. There are some very small S. Asian communities around Warner Center in the Valley and along Venice blvd. near Culver City.

Could be that LA isn't that significant of a tech hub.

Perhaps LA might in the future.
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  #87  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2019, 2:43 AM
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^ The numbers show that San Diego County and the LA CSA (roughly 5.5 times larger) essentially have an identical share of Indians (and SD has a thriving biotech economy). In fact, Irvine (population 275,000) is home to an Indian population (6% share) that numbers slightly less than half of SD County's total.

But on a slightly un/related note, the numbers do illustrate that SD's extremely Filipino... even more so than the Bay Area.

https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...prodType=table
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  #88  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2019, 9:26 PM
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Despite all the hype about Silicon Beach LA's tech sector is fairly small. San Diego and Irvine are more significant as tech hubs for Socal.

And what tech industry it does have is more connected to the entertainment industry such as Amazon Studios.
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  #89  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2019, 2:42 AM
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^ Okay? Talk about a red herring argument. I was just debunking your theory about Indian population vis-a-vis tech economy, and used an example you gave to do it. Boston's another example... smaller Indian population than Dallas and Houston, two cities that aren't really "tech hubs."
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  #90  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2019, 9:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
^ Okay? Talk about a red herring argument. I was just debunking your theory about Indian population vis-a-vis tech economy, and used an example you gave to do it. Boston's another example... smaller Indian population than Dallas and Houston, two cities that aren't really "tech hubs."
It depends on the city. The Indian communities in Chincago and NYC metro were already well established while most of the recent growth is due to H1b Tech Visas and in the Bay Area there really wasn't a major community until the 90s.
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  #91  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2019, 10:58 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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NYC seems to have the only really sizeable working class South Asian population among major US cities.
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  #92  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2019, 11:20 PM
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Originally Posted by jd3189 View Post
In Florida, I think Orlando has a sizable Filipino community. Miami never did have a large community of any Asian group.
Orlando also has a lot of Vietnamese too and Orlando for some reason attracts a lot of Asians compared to Miami.
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  #93  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2019, 12:19 AM
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It depends on the city. The Indian communities in Chincago and NYC metro were already well established while most of the recent growth is due to H1b Tech Visas and in the Bay Area there really wasn't a major community until the 90s.
California, and more specifically, the Bay Area, may have had a lot of recent growth (and perhaps a higher share from recent growth), but it's a bit reaching to claim the Chicago or NYC metro was more well-established than the West coasters in this regard.

There were already thousands of Sikhs living in California over 100 years ago.

The first Indian American and Asian American in general to be elected to congress came from California's early Indian/South Asian community.

Dalip Singh Saund (September 20, 1899 – April 22, 1973) was an American politician who was a member of the United States House of Representatives. He served the 29th District of California from January 3, 1957 to January 3, 1963. He was the first Sikh American, the first Asian American, the first Indian American and the first member of a non-Abrahamic faith to be elected to Congress.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalip_Singh_Saund

https://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/echo...dom/title-page

San Francisco in the 1910s to late 1940s even was the headquarters of an Indian revolutionary movement (albeit one that failed in its goals) that included Punjabi migrant workers and intellectuals and students in the US and abroad trying to fight for India's independence against what was then British colonial rule.

NorCal and SoCal alike have had South Asians long before any IT boom.

https://medium.com/secret-desi-history

http://religionclasss2014.blogspot.c...s-angeles.html
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  #94  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2019, 3:17 AM
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Orlando also has a lot of Vietnamese too and Orlando for some reason attracts a lot of Asians compared to Miami.

i was surprised to see orlando has viettown strip, not unlike northeast atlanta/chamblee.
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  #95  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2019, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
^ Okay? Talk about a red herring argument. I was just debunking your theory about Indian population vis-a-vis tech economy, and used an example you gave to do it. Boston's another example... smaller Indian population than Dallas and Houston, two cities that aren't really "tech hubs."
I'm not sure if Boston is really a "tech hub", though. Yeah, it's a massive research/innovation hub, but the major tech firms don't have a big presence. Traditional firms like Apple, Microsoft, Samsung, Oracle, Cisco and new firms like Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, Uber, don't have much of a presence, meaning there isn't tremendous need for H-1B visas.

In contrast, Silicon Valley has a gigantic demand for H-1B, hence the massive Indian population around San Jose.
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  #96  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2019, 7:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I'm not sure if Boston is really a "tech hub", though. Yeah, it's a massive research/innovation hub, but the major tech firms don't have a big presence. Traditional firms like Apple, Microsoft, Samsung, Oracle, Cisco and new firms like Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, Uber, don't have much of a presence, meaning there isn't tremendous need for H-1B visas.

In contrast, Silicon Valley has a gigantic demand for H-1B, hence the massive Indian population around San Jose.
Odd take, since I’ve never seen Boston described as being anything other than a tech hub. Its industry is definitely more health-based and less IT, social media, and entertainment, that’s for sure.

“Tech” is a really broad-based term these days, and I’ve noticed that it’s often used in the context of describing cities with an educated workforce or startups receiving VC funding.

In the former case, DC, Denver, Austin, etc. are supposedly “tech hubs,” while LA less so. But we gave birth to the Internet, was a player in early social media (MySpace), invented “Stories” through Snapchat before Instagram hijacked it, started the scooter revolution through Bird, and are home to SpaceX, whose plan is to launch 42,000 satellites to provide high-speed Internet service worldwide.
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  #97  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2019, 1:39 AM
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But we gave birth to the Internet
Half true. UCLA was one of the first two nodes, and SRI in Menlo Park (Bay Area) was the other. The relevance isn't the nodes, but the connection between the two, and because that was obviously simultaneous, neither locale has a better claim to being the 'birthplace' of the Internet than the other one does.
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  #98  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2019, 1:45 AM
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Fair enough. Point being, I don’t think LA gets enough credit for its tech contributions. Name one notable tech-related trend a la Stories or Bird or SpaceX that NYC, Boston, or Austin has produced in recent memory. LOL at the WeWork (is that even tech?) IPO disaster.
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  #99  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2019, 2:26 AM
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Your state invented the freaking internet.

The internet.
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  #100  
Old Posted Nov 3, 2019, 1:07 AM
RST500 RST500 is offline
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Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
Fair enough. Point being, I don’t think LA gets enough credit for its tech contributions. Name one notable tech-related trend a la Stories or Bird or SpaceX that NYC, Boston, or Austin has produced in recent memory. LOL at the WeWork (is that even tech?) IPO disaster.
"Los Angeles' high-tech employment increased 14.7 percent during 2016 and 2017 compared with a 13.5 percent rise during the prior two-year period"

http://www.cbre.us/people-and-office...-office-growth
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