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Old Posted Jun 12, 2010, 6:04 PM
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A bus ride through London's financial district -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQxSl41qVKM

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  #602  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2010, 4:19 PM
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Great ride - that gives a great sense of where the Shard is going to sit compared to the other developments. 8 mins to get from Bishopsgate to London Bridge, though - hardly faster than walking pace!

Some pics taken last week of Heron and the Pinnacle.







And one from a bit earlier of the Shard - this will be a great view when there is just a wall of glass at the end of the road:

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  #603  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2010, 3:21 PM
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And finally someone gets 1NC right!!



I'm sorry, but most of the people who post to - and run - another well-known skyscraper forum are some of the dumbest idiots you will ever encounter on the web.

But, finally, one of them has seen One New Change in real life. And he responds to the clowns who have just seen a picture and think "it's all horriball brown clading" [sic]

Finally, one of the brighter members actually goes to see it.

Quote:
Have you seen it in real life? The cladding is absolutely stunning imo, it appears different colours from different angles and in different types of light. On Sunday it went from brown to deep red to grey as we walked around it.
Exactly, Smoggie_Si. It's an interactive building that changes colour as you walk past. It really is very clever. And when the roof is opened up it will get better still.

As one journalist said: "Jean Nouvel’s One New Change is a City chameleon".

It is a great building, unless of course, you only experience it through a picture on a website.
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  #604  
Old Posted Jun 18, 2010, 3:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wjfox2004 View Post
A bus ride through London's financial district -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQxSl41qVKM

This is a great video showing off the architecture of London's financial district. I am saving it to my favorites on youtube.

Bedhead - Thanks for the pictures of showing off the progress on the Shard.
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  #605  
Old Posted Jun 18, 2010, 4:46 PM
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one new change is impressive and fits in well.
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  #606  
Old Posted Jun 18, 2010, 9:29 PM
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http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/lifest...ndon-towers.do


High hopes: The new towers of London

Kieran Long
18.06.10


There was a time, around the start of 2009, when it felt like every grand building project in London had stalled. Plans for a multitude of soaring shiny towers, conceived at the very height of the boom years, were filed away, the money to build them having, apparently, disintegrated in an instant. Workmen walked off sites. The skeletons of grand office blocks, only half-constructed and already bankrupt, stood silent; follies, a testament to a bygone era.

How quickly history rights itself. 'As of this moment I'm not aware of any project that's still on hold,' says Peter Rees, the chief planning officer of the City of London. 'People are either on site, in the process of tendering or are concluding deals.'

What's this? A recently beleaguered property industry in bullish mood? Are we, against the odds, at the beginning of a new property boom in London? The straight answer is no. While there are cranes over the City, and a rash of proposals for tall buildings from Vauxhall to Canary Wharf, from Blackfriars to Croydon, these are still difficult times.

It might seem curious that, with a traumatised economy, the property industry would not take time to re-evaluate the schemes it had proposed in the fat times. Perhaps the temples to commerce that skyscrapers represent might feel a little hubristic at this point in the economic cycle. But not a bit of it. That kind of thinking takes too long and renegotiating planning permission is too arduous. It's quicker to dust off old plans than to make new ones. London will get a clutch of tall buildings that were designed for a boom, and delivered after a chastening recession. There are some on site already: the 230m Heron Tower by the London office of American architect Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF) will finish early next year, and the 310m Shard by star architect Renzo Piano, above London Bridge station, will also be finished in time for the 2012 Olympics.







Rees is measured in his prognosis. 'I don't see this as the start of a new property boom. Developers are simply meeting demand that currently exists, because there is a shortage of grade-A office space in the City. In the longer term, people have significant question marks about the state of the world economy and so on. They're just getting the product there while there's demand.'

So it could be that the resurrection of the Walkie Talkie, Darth Vader's Helmet, the Helter-Skelter and all the rest that make up the cast of characters that will compete for attention on the London skyline will be the last of a generation of tall buildings in the City. The two most significant buildings that are currently under construction in the Square Mile are both by the same architect, KPF. The Heron Tower on Bishopsgate is nearly there and has emerged as a pretty regular-looking office building. It has none of the fancy shapemaking of the Gherkin, rather it has straight edges and right angles. Paul Simovic of KPF, the architect in charge of the Heron Tower, says, 'I think it has a very different attitude from the so-called iconic buildings. We focused on having a sensitive approach to orientation and site. The building allows other people to build near it and forms part of the urban fabric rather than elbowing others out of the way. The materials are high quality but nothing that screams, and there's a focus on the ground floor, with a recessed arcade at the front entrance and a pedestrianised area next to it.'

While Heron Tower is one of the buildings in the City that hasn't yet spawned a nickname, that is perhaps because it is trying to be more modest. KPF's other proposal is less so. The Pinnacle tower, which at 288m will be the second highest building in the country after the Shard, will cost £1 billion and will be completed in 2013. Work has just begun on the spiralling form, which has been dubbed the Helter-Skelter.

Paul Katz, president of KPF, says that these towers are a vital part of the identity of London. 'I find it gratifying to see all these towers in London because many years ago, in the
mid-1990s, we were advocating clusters of towers but there was strong opposition. I think the tall building is the building type of the 21st century. I can see why in London there would be concern about tall buildings eviscerating the unique scale of the city. But I think that contrast between high and low and old and new is exciting.'

The other proposals, all of which, I was told by sources in the City, are moving forward, are Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners' Leadenhall Building (nicknamed the Cheesegrater), Rafael Viñoly Architects' 20 Fenchurch Street (the Walkie Talkie), and the so-called groundscraper of the 22-storey Walbrook Square by Foster + Partners and French architect Jean Nouvel (Darth Vader's Helmet, according to some).















The City has been having these debates for years, and every building there is subjected to close scrutiny by English Heritage and other bodies. But perhaps the most noticeable of the forthcoming proposals for towers are those beyond the Square Mile. Building on the various 'clusters' of towers in Vauxhall, Blackfriars and Croydon seems to be progressing, and the skylines of these areas will be transformed.

Vauxhall could have at least five new residential towers of between 20 and more than 40 storeys, if plans are approved on a variety of developments. The Nine Elms area has become prime development land thanks to the recent announcement that the American Embassy will move there and also because of the masterplan to regenerate Battersea Power Station and its surroundings with residential units, shops, office space and even a new Tube link. The pressure is on to develop.

Proposals include Hampton House by Foster + Partners, Carey Jones's Vauxhall Cross eco tower (the Vauxhall Sky Gardens), and Keith Williams Architects' 24-storey residential tower just a block inland from the river at 81 Black Prince Road. Towers in the Vauxhall area have met with opposition from local residents, particularly the Octave Tower, designed by Make Architects, the practice run by Ken Shuttleworth. The project was refused planning permission last year, but the developer has appealed and results of that appeal are due in June. Another controversial scheme is Squire and Partners' proposal for two towers of 42 and 31 storeys at Vauxhall Cross, which is due to go in for planning this summer. Steve Bee, director of planning and development for English Heritage, says that although EH is now comfortable with the plans for Battersea Power Station, the Vauxhall Cross towers are worry-ing. He says: 'These buildings at Vauxhall Cross do give us cause for concern because they affect the backdrop to the Westminster World Heritage Site.'







The south end of Blackfriars Bridge has been touted as a potential location for a cluster of towers for some time, and developer Beetham and Mirax is now seemingly beginning work again on the largest of these (the 52-storey, boomerang-shaped Beetham Tower by Ian Simpson Architects). 'Refinancing has been completed on the project and the developers are now in discussion with funds and other partners with a view to going on site next year,' says Ian Simpson. Although the Number One Blackfriars project (also known as Beetham Tower) was opposed by Boris Johnson, it already has planning permission thanks to a decision by the then Secretary of State Hazel Blears. But Simpson sees his design as timeless enough to endure. 'It is a building that will last for 100 years. Opposing tall buildings is a very easy political win. When most people think of them, they would think of something built in the 1960s and say they don't like them. But if you can allow people to experience them, they see that they can have significant value.' Number One Blackfriars is a hotel and residential scheme, with a public viewing gallery at high level, a mix that Simpson sees as fitting in with other visitor attractions along the South Bank.







Behind the £1 billion Beetham Tower is 20 Blackfriars Road, a site with planning permission for two glassy towers designed by Stirling Prize-winning architect Wilkinson Eyre. Circleplane, the developer of the project, has since dropped Wilkinson Eyre from the project, and its future in its current form looks uncertain, according to sources close to the project.

Vauxhall and Blackfriars Bridge are locations that currently do not have high buildings, but they are hoping. The idea of 'clustering' tall buildings is seen, by English Heritage and the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment, as the best way to reduce their impact on the skyline.

The City of London's high-rise drive will continue north, with towers creeping up Shoreditch High Street, allowing Hackney and Tower Hamlets to get in on the action and making a cluster of tall buildings, if a cluster it can really be called, more than a mile long from Fenchurch Street to Bishopsgate Goods Yard. Foster + Partners has designed a tower for the site just north of the Broadgate Tower (which attracted objections because of its plan to demolish a listed building on the site). The currently vacant Bishopsgate Goods Yard has a masterplan by Terry Farrell and Partners, now formally adopted by Tower Hamlets, proposing a number of tall buildings, the case for which is aided by the recently opened Shoreditch station.







Canary Wharf continues to spread, with several new towers planned in and around the West India and Millwall Docks, including the soon-to-be-completed 22 Marsh Wall (two residential towers of 140m and 98m) and the massive Riverside South proposal. Canary Wharf does not begin building before it has tenants signed up to occupy the space, and this lack of a speculative approach means it is not certain when many of these projects will happen. There are two sites where work is ready to begin. JP Morgan's new headquarters at Riverside South, consisting of two towers of 37 and 45 storeys designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, has begun preliminary works on site. Another site, at 25 Churchill Place, is to be subject to another planning application shortly from KPF, although the start-on-site date is not confirmed.

And what kind of city will these towers make London? That's a question few could answer, even among those designing and building them – they're all just grateful for having some work in what promise to be hard times over the next couple of years. When you look at the skyline in five years' time, remind yourself that you are not looking at the architecture of prosperity but of what came after. We'll have to wait to find out what these strange shapes on the London skyline will come to symbolise.



Reader views (2)


I agree with fuzzylogic. And it's nice to see a positive comment. Most people only write when they have something negative to say!

- Cary, New York, NY, 18/06/2010 19:51


Is it just me - I find these proposals - and the pictures of them - exciting and inspiring.
All too often we seem to think that UKplc has had its day. I think that this shows that the sceptics are wrong.


- fuzzylogic, Billericay, 18/06/2010 17:44
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  #607  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2010, 7:34 PM
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Some pics I took today.



First, from the penthouse level of Strata:












And from level 32 of Centrepoint:






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  #608  
Old Posted Jun 26, 2010, 3:30 PM
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I can never get over how eclectic London is. All this new steel and glass juxtaposed with the older buildings is such pleasure for the senses
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  #609  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2010, 2:27 PM
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Heron reportedly signs first tenant

July 6 (Bloomberg) -- Gerald Ronson’s Heron International secured the first tenant for what will be the tallest tower in the City of London, a person with knowledge of the agreement said.


http://www.businessweek.com/news/201...kyscraper.html
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Old Posted Jul 18, 2010, 10:04 AM
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JP Morgan confirms Riverside South doubt



It's been an open secret for months but the Telegraph puts something in print.

My three'penny worth.

1: It's shocking how the Labour government can place into jeaopardy the last big industry we have left- not that the present Tory one looks like being much better.

2: Of course JPM could be angling to get whatever they can from going ahead with the deal. But the really laughable idea, as written by one or two idiotic web "journalists" is that JPM can't afford to pull out as cancelling would leave them with a £76m bill. This, a company that just announced profits for one quarter of £4.8bn and £76m is less than a quarter they just paid in (another) "one-off" tax to HMG.

3: If British people, and Londoners in particular, don't get over their hatred of bankers there soon won't be any left in this country to pay their taxes here and to create the thousands of jobs that we all rely on. Our politicians are playing a game of poker with some of the best poker players around. God help us if the bankers call the bluff because they will be gone before we know it and they won't be coming back in our lifetime.

Anyway, now that I got that off my chest, here's the story:


JP Morgan has raised serious concerns about its commitment to its new £1.5bn European headquarters at Canary Wharf because of anger within the bank at the lack of support for the financial sector in the UK.

Jamie Dimon, chief executive of the American bank, is understood to have doubts about investing so heavily in London when there is uncertainty about future costs that could be imposed on banks. Some sources said the bank was "on the verge" of quitting the development.

Any move by JP Morgan to scrap the twin skyscraper project in the Docklands would be a major blow for the UK and George Osborne's claims that Britain is "open for business".

High-level talks are understood to have taken place between JP Morgan, officials from the Mayor of London's office and Canary Wharf Group (CWG) over the future of the headquarters, although no decision has been reached.

Boris Johnson, the London Mayor, has met representatives of JP Morgan and has been told of their concerns about the future of London as a financial centre.

The bank has made it clear that it now sees expansion being in Asia rather than in London.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/n...e-at-risk.html
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Old Posted Jul 22, 2010, 8:46 AM
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Heron Tower

The spire was added this morning.




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Old Posted Jul 25, 2010, 8:47 AM
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^^^ Great shot!

Quote:
Originally Posted by iciLondres
But, finally, one of them has seen One New Change in real life. And he responds to the clowns who have just seen a picture and think "it's all horriball brown clading" [sic]

Finally, one of the brighter members actually goes to see it.

Quote:
Have you seen it in real life? The cladding is absolutely stunning imo, it appears different colours from different angles and in different types of light. On Sunday it went from brown to deep red to grey as we walked around it.
Exactly, Smoggie_Si. It's an interactive building that changes colour as you walk past. It really is very clever. And when the roof is opened up it will get better still.

As one journalist said: "Jean Nouvel’s One New Change is a City chameleon".

It is a great building, unless of course, you only experience it through a picture on a website.
I'm still agnostic about One New Change. The roof garden is great, the visual effects created by the glass are great, and most of all the prospect of visitors being pulled into the City, especially the lively area around Bow Lane and Bow Church Yard is great.

But the view down Cheapside still looks like big box retail with a shiny skin.

I wouldn't mind so much, if it wasn't for the fact that Cheapside was once London's liveliest and most important street, but now is crying out for a building that makes it a bit more walkable.



The side facing St Pauls, on the other hand is brilliant. I'm sure we'll see lots of reflections of the cathedral on here in future:


my pics
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  #614  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2010, 9:27 PM
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Audio slideshow: Rise of the Heron Tower

http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/london/h...00/8892494.stm
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Old Posted Aug 11, 2010, 9:33 PM
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The Shard

A quick video I made this evening -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4dmSdrZRKM
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Old Posted Sep 8, 2010, 5:58 PM
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One New Change: I don't have an issue with its nearness to St. Paul's, since there are intevening minor buildings, and ONC does make reference to them in its exterior patterns. They were not as respectful to St. Paul's as the Paternoster area is (very well done) but it's not bad. (btw, Pageantmaster Ct., just down the road does a very nice job of interplay between buildings with different styles. In general, the St. Paul's area has been redone very well).

To me ONP has two problems. First the bulk is slightly excessive and gives it a bloated, hanging over the road feel. It should have been done at 90-95 percent size. This is rather a surprising aesthetic failure given the talent involved.

Second, the "chameleon" aspect just did not occur when I was there: it was always milky taupish, even though I was there morning, mid-day and night, cloudy and sunny. Not bad; the muted colors make its bulk less offensive, but nothing special either.
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  #617  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2010, 6:16 PM
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^^^ All fair points. I think there were some plans to widen the pavements in Cheapside, which might help alleviate some of the hanging over the road problem - assuming this is still going ahead in the age of austerity.
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Old Posted Sep 12, 2010, 6:57 AM
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Pinnacle - basement has shot up.


my pic
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Old Posted Sep 14, 2010, 4:15 AM
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Well, since I didn't offend anyone with my ONC comments, let me try the Gherkin. To my thinking the principal building in that area was Holland House, which has a vaguely Tudor-esque, vaguely Dutch cross-hatched pattern, which has a nice rhythm and is quite attractive. The rest of the area is consistent with it in size and look, although not particularly interesting.

The Gherkin seems out of place. I tried to see it as a twisted version of a cross-hatch but I couldn't do it. Color and shape likewise seem alien to the area. I guess it is trying for an organic, growing, bursting out look, but again, that isn't the place for it.

I didn't think it played well from longer distance either. From across the Thames, it stands out along with St. Paul's and the towers of the Cannon St. Station. However, I couldn't feel any dialog among them. I don't think the Gherkin had much to say other than I'm big and green.

In the right place it could have been good. Maybe in Canary Wharf which could use a little jazzing-up and could certainly use some "greenery".
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Old Posted Sep 17, 2010, 11:01 AM
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JPM Riverside South



Pretty widely-know already but from the Independent:

"JP Morgan, the US investment bank, is set to ditch plans to build a new European headquarters at London's Canary Wharf, and instead move into Lehman Brothers' old skyscraper in the Docklands financial district.

Property sources say the bank is ready to abandon its stalled £1.5bn project and relocate into the huge building that was occupied by Lehman, until its spectacular demise two years ago. "

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/bu...t-2081570.html
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