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  #401  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2017, 10:07 PM
nickw252 nickw252 is offline
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Originally Posted by biggus diggus View Post
Haha I have used that meme many times before. 100% agree.
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  #402  
Old Posted May 26, 2018, 3:20 PM
nickw252 nickw252 is offline
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Any idea what kind of tree this is?

It's in Pine




Last edited by nickw252; May 26, 2018 at 5:42 PM.
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  #403  
Old Posted May 26, 2018, 10:55 PM
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Another pic:

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  #404  
Old Posted May 26, 2018, 11:44 PM
soled soled is offline
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The trunk looks darker in than pic than it does in real life, but I'm sure that's a Tipu Tipuana tree. I have one in my front yard. Great tree.

Mine doesn't grow sideways, though
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  #405  
Old Posted May 27, 2018, 3:43 AM
nickw252 nickw252 is offline
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Originally Posted by soled View Post
The trunk looks darker in than pic than it does in real life, but I'm sure that's a Tipu Tipuana tree. I have one in my front yard. Great tree.

Mine doesn't grow sideways, though
I definitely think it looks like a tipu but I don’t think it is. The Tipu tree is hardy down to USDA zone 9. However, Pine is in USDA zone 7b. It also doesn’t get any supplemental watering.

http://www.public.asu.edu/~camartin/...puanatipu.html

http://www.plantmaps.com/interactive...diness-map.php
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  #406  
Old Posted May 27, 2018, 5:20 PM
soled soled is offline
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Originally Posted by nickw252 View Post
I definitely think it looks like a tipu but I don’t think it is. The Tipu tree is hardy down to USDA zone 9. However, Pine is in USDA zone 7b. It also doesn’t get any supplemental watering.

http://www.public.asu.edu/~camartin/...puanatipu.html

http://www.plantmaps.com/interactive...diness-map.php
I hear what you're saying, but the leaves, the branches and the buds in that closeup are my tipu tree exactly. If there's another tree that's just like that I'd be open to seeing a picture of it. In the meantime I'm absolutely convinced that's a tipu.
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  #407  
Old Posted May 29, 2018, 5:01 PM
nickw252 nickw252 is offline
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Originally Posted by soled View Post
I hear what you're saying, but the leaves, the branches and the buds in that closeup are my tipu tree exactly. If there's another tree that's just like that I'd be open to seeing a picture of it. In the meantime I'm absolutely convinced that's a tipu.
You're probably right, I'll let you know if I hear otherwise.
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  #408  
Old Posted May 29, 2018, 5:03 PM
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Deleted.

Last edited by nickw252; May 29, 2018 at 5:17 PM.
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  #409  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2018, 8:45 PM
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Sound Barrier Plants

I'm under contract to purchase a house with a back yard that backs up to a busy street. I'm looking to have a hedge along that wall to help block the sound and view (in addition to the existing block wall).

What is everyone's opinion of the best sound barrier? I'm interested in both the noise reduction and growth rate. The wall is about 150 feet so I'll need a lot of plants.

I'm thinking Oleander would probably be the best. It grows fast and is dense. It's also drought tolerant. Also considering ficus nitida, but I currently have many ficus trees in my lawn and they're very messy.

Thoughts?
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  #410  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2018, 9:11 PM
biggus diggus biggus diggus is online now
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I would encourage anyone to look at every option but oleander. They are poisonous. They kill animals and they are actually one of the plants the city of Phoenix won't even accept in their composting program. Why anyone would plant that devil plant is beyond me.
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  #411  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2018, 9:31 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
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Originally Posted by nickw252 View Post
I'm under contract to purchase a house with a back yard that backs up to a busy street. I'm looking to have a hedge along that wall to help block the sound and view (in addition to the existing block wall).

What is everyone's opinion of the best sound barrier? I'm interested in both the noise reduction and growth rate. The wall is about 150 feet so I'll need a lot of plants.

I'm thinking Oleander would probably be the best. It grows fast and is dense. It's also drought tolerant. Also considering ficus nitida, but I currently have many ficus trees in my lawn and they're very messy.

Thoughts?
My parents have a Ficus "hedge" made out of about 7 or 8 Ficus it took several years for them to grow together and they look great but they are terrible at being a good sound block as Ficus are basically hollow besides their thin leafey exterior.

i would not recommend it for a sound barrier.
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  #412  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2018, 12:03 AM
DesertRay DesertRay is offline
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Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
My parents have a Ficus "hedge" made out of about 7 or 8 Ficus it took several years for them to grow together and they look great but they are terrible at being a good sound block as Ficus are basically hollow besides their thin leafey exterior.

i would not recommend it for a sound barrier.
Would a juniper bush work? I know you have to water them over the summer deeply from time to time.
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  #413  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2018, 2:08 AM
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For noise: get a fountain of some type to drown the noise. Trees will never be much of a sound barrier.

For a hedge, I'd highly recommend against ficus nitida. They're no doubt one of the best looking and pretty fast growing, but they're susceptible to freezing. I've twice grown an awesome ficus hedge, only to have it die back to the ground. Maybe if you're ok worrying about the winter freeze every few years, and are prepared to do anything it takes to protect it from the freeze, go ahead with the ficus.
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  #414  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2018, 4:16 PM
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We have a ficus hedge and I hate the damned thing. It looks great most of the time, but every two or three winters we get a frost that deduces it to ugly sticks for about a season.
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  #415  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2018, 2:27 PM
nickw252 nickw252 is offline
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Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
My parents have a Ficus "hedge" made out of about 7 or 8 Ficus it took several years for them to grow together and they look great but they are terrible at being a good sound block as Ficus are basically hollow besides their thin leafey exterior.

i would not recommend it for a sound barrier.
I never thought of this until you mentioned it - I just looked at my ficus hedge and you can see right through it in some areas (although I did just trim):



You're probably right, this wouldn't be a great sound barrier.
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  #416  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2018, 2:28 PM
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Originally Posted by pbenjamin View Post
We have a ficus hedge and I hate the damned thing. It looks great most of the time, but every two or three winters we get a frost that deduces it to ugly sticks for about a season.
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Originally Posted by PHX31 View Post
For noise: get a fountain of some type to drown the noise. Trees will never be much of a sound barrier.

For a hedge, I'd highly recommend against ficus nitida. They're no doubt one of the best looking and pretty fast growing, but they're susceptible to freezing. I've twice grown an awesome ficus hedge, only to have it die back to the ground. Maybe if you're ok worrying about the winter freeze every few years, and are prepared to do anything it takes to protect it from the freeze, go ahead with the ficus.
How mature are your ficus trees? I've never had this happen on mine but all of my trees are 15+ years old. That being said, I've only lived in this house for the last 3 winters and I don't think there have been any really harsh freezes.

Another concern with ficus is they take so much work. If you want to keep them in a hedge you have to constantly trim them, and no matter what, they are always dropping leaves.

I also plan on getting a fountain. That's a great way to create white noise to drown anything out.
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  #417  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2018, 2:35 PM
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Would a juniper bush work? I know you have to water them over the summer deeply from time to time.
Hadn't considered this. I'll look into it. Thanks.
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  #418  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2018, 2:37 PM
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Originally Posted by biggus diggus View Post
I would encourage anyone to look at every option but oleander. They are poisonous. They kill animals and they are actually one of the plants the city of Phoenix won't even accept in their composting program. Why anyone would plant that devil plant is beyond me.
I don't think I'll have any issues with them being poisonous. I don't have a dog and they'd be in an area far enough away from kids. Are there any other downsides in your opinion?
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  #419  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2018, 3:21 PM
biggus diggus biggus diggus is online now
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So you're fundamentally ok with bringing a poisonous plant into the world? Polluting the water supply? Having something that is generally considered to be a hazard in your yard?

Go get some oleander, then.
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  #420  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2018, 4:54 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
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Originally Posted by biggus diggus View Post
So you're fundamentally ok with bringing a poisonous plant into the world? Polluting the water supply? Having something that is generally considered to be a hazard in your yard?

Go get some oleander, then.
We get it, you dont like oleanders.

How do you feel about Arcadia and Uptown where oleanders are everywhere?
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