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  #21  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2005, 4:22 AM
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Thanks for the update.
     
     
  #22  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2005, 5:22 PM
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I like both projects in the rendering.
     
     
  #23  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2005, 11:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazpmk
Excavation has begun apparently on 300 Spear.

Image by naughtyins0mniac (SSC)(Posted APR 2 2005)


Are these thread heights and floors figures accurate ?
300 Spear: 400'/350'
40/35 floors

Emporis has 300 Spear at 34 and 32 floors

The pic is from April 2, so hopefully someone could take a photo of the site now and see if there is activity.
thanks for finding that pic. the height and floor counts for 300 Spear Street are accurate. emporis's data is outdated. i'll try to take a pic later this week if possible.
     
     
  #24  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2005, 9:46 PM
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more renderings:





     
     
  #25  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2005, 3:17 AM
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how often does this happen when you're building skyscrapers?

Few clues unearthed about mystery ship buried after Gold Rush
Dug up at condo project, site of old 'maritime junkyard'
- Carl Nolte, Chronicle Staff Writer
Thursday, September 8, 2005





Construction crews building a new high-rise condominium project in downtown San Francisco have uncovered a maritime mystery -- the remains of a large wooden sailing ship that probably dates from the 1849 Gold Rush.

The bones of the old ship were discovered last week 20 feet below Folsom Street near Spear Street, the site of a 650-unit building now under construction. Passers-by on Folsom Street could see the stern section of a ship, lying on its side. The ship was about 125 feet long, built of thick wooden timbers, and had a rudder about 6 feet high.

Archaeologists could not say much about this ship, though Richard Everett, a curator at the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, said that the site had once been the location of a ship-breaking yard owned by Charles Haer, and the ship was almost surely a relic of the Gold Rush.

Haer specialized in acquiring ships that had been anchored and left to moulder away in San Francisco's Yerba Buena Cove. He had them towed to his yard at what is now Folsom and Spear streets, where he employed Chinese crews to dismantle the ships. Typically, ship-breaking yards tried to salvage metal fittings and usable timber. "It was a kind of maritime junkyard,'' Everett said.

Haer, who operated his ship-breaking business for about 10 years, had plenty of ships to choose from. More than 805 vessels, carrying passengers from all over the world, entered the Golden Gate in 1849 alone as San Francisco turned from a village into a city almost overnight.

The ships anchored in Yerba Buena Cove in what is now downtown San Francisco. Most of them never went to sea again, abandoned as their passengers and often their entire crew left in search of gold.

Some were put to other uses -- offices, stores and a hotel. One ship was even used as the city jail. Most rotted away and were sold for scrap.

The discovery of the ship at Folsom Street was described as "awesome'' by James Allan, an archaeologist with William Self Associates, a firm that is cataloging the remains of the ship.

Allan thinks the ship is very old -- built, he thinks, in the 1820s, perhaps as early as 1810. Old ships like this were pressed into service to carry gold seekers to California. In many cases, it was their last voyage.

The ship comes complete with a mystery. The stern section is mostly intact, Allan said, but the bow is missing. "He (Haer) started salvaging the ship but never finished,'' Allan said. "I have no idea why.''

Tishman Speyer, the firm that is developing the condominium project, released a statement from its spokesmen in New York, promising to "strictly adhere'' to San Francisco guidelines for excavation and documentation of the ship.

The discovery is one of about 40 ships known to lie under the streets of downtown San Francisco. Marine historian James Delgado, who has written a book on San Francisco's buried ships, thinks there may be as many as 75 ships under downtown, most of them as yet undiscovered.

The last buried ship to be uncovered was the General Harrison, a Gold Rush ship discovered in the Financial District in 2001.

Allan said he and representatives of Tishman Speyer would meet with experts from the S.F. Maritime Historical Park to see how much of the ship could be salvaged and how to proceed.
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  #26  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2005, 4:56 AM
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Beautiful renderings, nice project !!!
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  #27  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2005, 2:12 PM
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I think it is really cool when they have finds like that ship under a construction site. Even though it does slow down the pace of work on the site. It is still fascinating to have such finds.
     
     
  #28  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2005, 10:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FourOneFive
how often does this happen when you're building skyscrapers?
As I recall a large office tower in downtown NY's construction was halted for a period because of excavational finds. I can't remember the tower though, might've been Chase or one of the black boxes around there (ie US Steel)
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  #29  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2005, 4:15 AM
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These projects are going make quite a visual statement in that part of town. It looks like the development is moving south of market. Those buildings are close enought to the water that they'll be very visible from the other side of the bridge.
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  #30  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2006, 4:51 AM
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300 Spear Under Construction (12/24/05):



     
     
  #31  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2006, 4:57 AM
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That's a deep hole.
     
     
  #32  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2006, 5:27 AM
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wow that is a deep hole...

nice to see an update. thanks.
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  #33  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2006, 5:30 AM
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Good to see excavation moving along quickly though.
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  #34  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2006, 4:24 PM
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Great, thanks for the update.
     
     
  #35  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2006, 8:09 PM
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As if 415’s pics demanded an explanation… Webcor Construction provides a project update…

http://www.webcor.com/current.html?proj_id=194

UPDATE
As neighbors and passer-bys who hear the pounding hammers can attest, we’ve hit rock bottom.

The project has now hauled out over 150,000 cubic yards of dirt and rock, and has reached the bottom of excavation in the Southeast corner. The first tower crane will be erected mid-January, hovering over 150 feet above street level. The final height of crane at project’s end will tower at over 400 feet above the street.

Excavation and shoring continue along the North and West sides, with the battalion of excavators, hammers, and drills beginning to carve out the bottom of the deepest portion of the 14 foot-thick mat foundation. Dewatering efforts have become more refined in order to protect the subgrade from groundwater penetrating into the site, which sits at one of the lowest points of the water table. Once excavation of the West side becomes more developed, a second tower crane of about 330 feet above street level will be erected. A manhoist descending down into the hole is among the more unique sights that can also be expected by month’s end.

The project welcomes the Webcor Concrete Group, whose operation is growing day by day as the excavation becomes more defined and the project gears up for pouring the building foundation.
....................................................................................................

nice to hear that we will see a tower crane this month
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  #36  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2006, 8:57 PM
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  #37  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2006, 10:21 PM
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For anyone who wanted to know where that ship came from, this is the rest of the stroy.

Experts dig up nautical past of long-buried 1818 whaler

Carl Nolte, Chronicle Staff Writer
Saturday, January 28, 2006


The bones of an old ship found by workers digging the foundations for a San Francisco high-rise last fall have been identified as the remains of a 188-year-old whaling ship out of the era made famous by Herman Melville's classic novel "Moby-Dick."

Maritime archaeologists are sure the ship is the three-masted bark Candace, built in Boston in 1818, which had a long career in the sea trades and later in hunting sperm whales in the South Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian oceans.

It also was one of the first American flag merchant ships to trade in the Pacific, years before the Oregon Territory and California became parts of the United States.

The Candace turned up in San Francisco after an ill-fated whaling voyage to the Arctic, where it was damaged in the pack ice. The ship had been at sea on a whaling voyage for two years, and Capt. Norman Starr decided to head home for New England. But the ship even then was old; leaking badly, and with the crew working the pumps as if their lives depended on it, the Candace made the Golden Gate on July 4, 1855.

It never sailed again. It was partly dismantled and eventually buried under the growing new city -- forgotten for nearly 150 years.

Its discovery is considered significant enough that the nearly intact hull of the old ship will become the centerpiece of the San Francisco History Museum when it opens in 2008 at the Old Mint in downtown San Francisco. "We consider it a coup,'' said Gil Castle, executive director of the San Francisco Museum and Historical Society, which is raising money to convert the mint at Fifth and Mission streets into a museum.

The saga of the Candace is part sea story, part detective work and partly a look into the economics of early San Francisco and the role of Chinese workers in the 1850s.

The bones of dozens of old ships lie under the streets of downtown San Francisco -- most of them abandoned after the Gold Rush of 1849. The Candace is the first one to be preserved intact.

"Before this ship, all the ships unearthed in San Francisco have been destroyed or reburied, burying our history forever,'' said James Allan, a maritime archaeologist who helped identify the ship.

Allan believes the discovery and preservation of the Candace is an important historical event on a number of levels.

Allan was the consulting archaeologist called in late last summer when work crews found the timbers of what appeared to be an old ship while excavating the foundations for two high-rise towers near Folsom Street in the South of Market district. Allan knew that in the 1850s, the area had been the location of a ship-dismantling yard run by Charles Hare, a pioneer businessman.

The yard was significant for a number of reasons, Allen said. Hare employed only Chinese workers, "men on the margins of society at that time, workers who were excluded from most employment,'' Allan said.

When Allan looked at the timbers, he realized it was a small sailing ship, about 100 feet long. He consulted James Delgado, executive director of the Vancouver Maritime Museum in Canada, an old friend who had begun his career at the San Francisco National Maritime Historical Park.

They consulted old San Francisco newspaper accounts, ship logs, other maritime museums, and the Center for Wood Anatomy Research run by the U.S. Forest Service in Madison, Wis.

The two concluded that the ship was made of three kinds of oak and two kinds of pine and was built on the east coast of the United States around 1820. One newspaper account mentioned five ships in the process of being scrapped at the Hare yard. One ship was too small, another too big, and two others were disqualified for other reasons. That left the Candace, a whaler.

One big clue: Allan had found two sperm whale teeth in the bowels of the ship.

Delgado and Allan love ships, the older the better. Delgado likes to speak of them in the present tense: "The Candace is built in Boston in 1818, sails in the South America trade, then into the Pacific. This is a ship that carried the American flag into the Pacific,'' he said.

He quotes old articles, one from a Captain Bates, who sailed aboard the Candace as a passenger from Callao, Peru, in November 1823. He wrote about the "thrill that fills the soul when the order is given to weigh anchor for home.''

He also wrote of a storm in the Atlantic, of sighting the coast of the United States after three months at sea, of taking on a sea pilot off Rhode Island. "What's the news of the states, pilot?'' the captain asked. "What's the state of the world? Who's to be our next president?'' It was that long ago.

The Candace became a whaler later, sailing from New London, Conn.

Delgado said more than 2,500 whaling voyages began from New London, as many as from the more famous Nantucket.

Each trip took two years, at least, and the Candace hunted whales (using small boats and harpooners) in the South Atlantic, the Indian Ocean, the Pacific and finally the Arctic for 17 years. The normal complement was 25 men. The ship was 99 feet, 8 inches long and 26 feet wide.

The Candace was discovered under the foundation site in September, removed to a warehouse on the San Francisco waterfront in October, and cleaned up.

"I loved finding this ship's story,'' said Delgado. "That's why I'm in this business.''

E-mail Carl Nolte at cnolte@sfchronicle.com.
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  #38  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2006, 11:10 PM
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That article is very fascinating. It makes me wonder what interesting things lie under the surface here in Chicago, waiting to be discovered.
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  #39  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2006, 11:22 PM
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Fantastic article. That will make one hell of an exhibit at the museum. I'll have to go up there when it opens in '08.

Can any of the Bay Area forumers verify if the first tower crane has started to rise? In The Cheat's photo, you can see the base is in place (bottom right corner), and the update that rocketman posted said mid-January, which we're well past.
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  #40  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2006, 5:43 PM
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Don't think that it has.

Perhaps a bit off-topic, but I never tire of these things (inlaid in sidewalks downtown):



Half the Financial District was once underwater. A pretty surreal thought.
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