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  #61  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2007, 1:33 AM
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Has anyone heard anything more on the Fredericton Square Office Building that is supposed to go up beside TD Bank?
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  #62  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2007, 12:18 PM
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O'Ree, Grant get hockey arenas in their honour
By HEATHER MCLAUGHLIN
mclaughlin.heather@dailygleaner.com
Published Wednesday September 5th, 2007
Appeared on page A1

City councillors accepted a community group's proposal Tuesday to name sports complexes in Fredericton after two of the city's shining hockey stars.

Mayor Brad Woodside said councillors have been hearing feedback from the public regarding the issue -- and with the 50th anniversary of Willie O'Ree's debut in the NHL in January -- it was the right time to honour O'Ree.

"It was a unanimous council decision,'' said Woodside on Tuesday night.

A citizens' group made its formal pitch to council, urging that O'Ree be the namesake for the northside sports and leisure complex opened earlier this year.

NHL star Danny Grant's name was put forward as the moniker for the arena on the south side of the city, which is currently in design.

Fredericton lawyer David Hashey said Fredericton-born O'Ree made hockey history when he broke the National Hockey League's colour barrier.

"Time will never change his place in history," Hashey said.

O'Ree joined the NHL on Jan. 18, 1958. The anniversary of his first NHL game will be marked on that date next year.

The 71-year-old California resident continues to travel all over North America as director of youth development for NHL diversity.

David Sansom said Grant is often referred to as the Iron Man for playing 566 consecutive games. He amassed 263 goals and 273 assists for 536 points in his career.

While playing for the Detroit Red Wings, Grant became the 12th player in NHL history to score 50 goals.

After retiring from the Los Angeles Kings in 1979, Grant returned to Fredericton and has supported home-town hockey at all levels since.

"Heroes are not created by NHL statistics or public appearances, but are in contrast defined by their contribution after the lights have dimmed ... Danny Grant became a hero when he unselfishly gave himself back to the community," Sansom said.

Fredericton lawyer Bob Kenny said the accomplishments of both men are legendary, their character sound and their love of the community immense.

Both deserve to have their contributions acknowledged in a meaningful and lasting way by naming the two sportsplexes in their honour, Kenny said.

The citizens' group came armed with letters of support from the presidents of the University of New Brunswick and St. Thomas University, Hockey New Brunswick, senators and other sports groups.
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  #63  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2007, 5:49 PM
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Second wetland discovered at new arena site
By SHAWN BERRY
berry.shawn@dailygleaner.com
Published Friday September 14th, 2007
Appeared on page A1

The City of Fredericton has applied for a permit to alter a wetland on the southside civic centre worksite.

The move comes after it was discovered last spring that the property near the intersection of Kimble Drive and Allison Boulevard is home to not one, but two wetlands.

While planners were able to maintain the regulated 30-metre distance from the wetland they knew about on the west side of the property near Vanier Highway, the more recently discovered one isn't as simple to contend with, said community services director Wayne Tallon on Thursday.

"This other wetland is somewhat more central on the site, which is more problematic."

The wetland offers most of the natural drainage for the site and provides headwaters that flow into Corbett Brook.

The city has hired Jacques Whitford to consult on the issue. The engineering firm is expected to report to the city as early as today with a list of options for addressing the situation. Those will be forwarded to the province.

Reed Hentze, a wetland biologist with the Department of the Environment, confirmed the city has already applied for a watercourse and wetlands alteration permit for the property. Hentze said the second wetland will have to figure into any work done on the site.

"Basically, we're looking for them to design their arena complex around that wetland feature within reason," Hentze said.

"We're trying to promote sustainable development. We want them to develop around the wetland as much as possible."

Wetlands are inundated or saturated by enough surface or ground water to normally support vegetation that is typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions. Wetlands usually include swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas.

The second wetland was discovered by a member of the public who alerted the environment department.

A city official said a previous survey, which only indicated the one wetland near the property's perimetre, had been conducted in late summer.

City officials couldn't say how much the work might add to the civic centre's price tag .

Tallon said he is confident the Department of the Environment will rule in the city's favour.

"With the topographical information and the information we have at our disposal, we have had some discussions with the Department of the Environment,'' said Tallon.

"That's how we got the temporary permit to do the geotechnical work to further understand the soils and the significance of the wetlands and help deal with it."
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  #64  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2007, 6:24 PM
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Small city, big festival

By JACQUELINE LEBLANC
leblanc.jacqueline@dailygleaner.com
Published Monday September 17th, 2007
Appeared on page A1

Harvest Jazz and Blues Festival organizers are singing the praises of volunteers, and our city's ability to successfully stage an international event.
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Music director Brent Staben said between 75,000 and 80,000 music lovers came out to the shows, which started last week and wrapped up Sunday. Only one show out of 40 wasn't sold out.

Staeben said the festival was an amazing success.

"We're just over the moon about it," he said Sunday. "It's a testament to what Fredericton can achieve. It's all volunteer run and the committee works very hard to raise its goals every year and create a bigger and better event, and we've been doing that for 17 years.

"And again, it's very satisfying to have what we think is an international festival here in this town."

He said performers gave them positive feedback for organization.

"When we have people like Dr. John coming in here and saying, 'You guys are doing it right. You're doing it just as good as it's done anywhere.' It's very satisfying for sure," Staeben said.

The festival wrapped up Sunday with thousands packing into Officers Square for the final show. Headliner Molly Johnson dropped by for a final performance.

Committee members would like to see an economic impact study done to see how much money the festival brings into the community.

The last one was done in the late 1990s, said David Seabrook, festival spokesman.

"We know that the Harvest Jazz and Blues Festival has a huge economic impact," Seabrook said. "Maybe between $5-million-$7 million for the local economy.

"Everything from babysitters, to restaurants, to hotels, to sound technicians, you name it. It's been a few years since we've done a study. I think we're all interested in what that current impact is."

A new study would benefit the entire community, he said.

"It's very important when you're a festival at the scale that Harvest is now, and have the impact on the community, it takes resources in the entire community to pull it off. So I think it's important for the community to know what that is."

Staeben said the festival's success is due to the community's commitment.

"This festival speaks to the potential of the community," he said. "This community can do great things. It's an incredible event for the city."
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  #65  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2007, 5:40 AM
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Yeah Id say! haha. Me and my GF were trying to get to the market on saturday...we had to park like a mile away because there were so many people downtown!
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  #66  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2007, 6:20 PM
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District 18 unveils drawings for Albert Street school replacement
By GLENNA HANLEY
For The Daily Gleaner
Published Thursday September 20th, 2007
Appeared on page A5

With the construction of Kimble Park School weeks away, disappointed residents of the old Alberta Street Middle School neighbourhood are turning their attention to the future.
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Parents such as Marylou McKenna, the former chairwoman of Albert Street's parent-school support committee, said it's time to recognize the changing demographics of an aging neighbourhood.

"People are seeing the benefits now and putting their differences aside and seeing what's best for the kids," said McKenna who has served on the committee for six years.

McKenna was among a small but steady stream of residents to attend an open house Wednesday night at the Albert Street school where education officials displayed drawings of what its replacement will look like.

"The new school is so needed and it's going to be so beneficial for the children that I am beyond any sadness," McKenna said,

Parents in the Kimble Drive area are jumping for joy at the prospects of having the new facility within walking distance of their homes.

"My daughter is just starting Grade 5. She'll be in that school and it is just a hop, skip and a jump away," said Patsy Williams.

She said there are lots of young families in her area to fill the facility designed for 650 students.

Albert Street school had been serving increasing numbers of children bused in from other areas, such as Lincoln and New Maryland.

Susan Price from Hanwell Road, another parent excited about the new school, said a few minutes more on the bus to Kimble Drive won't make much difference for her children.

"I'm just excited to see the kids get into a new school because this one is worn out," said Price.

Contracts for the site work and construction of the 7,288-square-metre facility will be announced next week along with the price tag for the 21-classroom school.

Architect Robert Phillips believes construction can get underway by late October for a tentative completion date in spring 2009.

Exactly how the school will impact the existing park and its tennis courts, soccer and ball field isn't clear.

The district has a few details to hammer out with the city which built the park, said District 18 Supt. Alex Dingwall.

"Right now we have to sit down with the city. We have one soccer field and we would like a second one," said Dingwall. But as with other school sites, the school will have priority use during school hours.

A large stand of trees will be removed to accommodate the school but a popular walking trail at the back will remain and may be extended, said Dingwall.

A major improvement from the current school will be a bus parking area. It will accommodate nine or 10 buses at once and won't disrupt local traffic as occurs on Albert Street, said Phillips.

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  #67  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2007, 9:04 PM
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DOT says pedestrians often ignore pedways
By SHAWN BERRY
berry.shawn@dailygleaner.com
Published Wednesday September 26th, 2007
Appeared on page A1

The Department of Transportation will talk to the City of Fredericton about the viability of setting up pedestrian overpasses for Route 8, but it isn't keen.

"We think our concerns about whether or not a pedestrian overpass would be used remain the same," said Department of Transportation spokeswoman Tracey Burkhardt on Tuesday.

Student leaders have pressed for a safer route across the old Trans-Canada Highway.

A report recently prepared for the city indicated an overpass between the University of New Brunswick and Skyline Acres would be the most feasible, and probably cost about $1 million to construct.

Route 8 is a provincial highway, and the city will be encouraging the province to consider such pedestrian overpasses as part of future work in the area.

But the province has seen less than convincing results from similar projects.

"Our experience with fencing and overpasses is that people don't necessarily use them even if it's provided," Burkhardt said.

Students in Riverview continue to run across a four-lane roadway despite the proximity of a pedestrian overpass the province provided near their high school.

"We have our experience with fencing behind the malls here in Fredericton. We fence it up and they cut a hole in the fence and keep on going."

While the department has its reservations about any such project, Burkhardt said staff members are willing to talk to Fredericton representatives.

Burkhardt said DOT hasn't seen a copy of a report prepared for the city that provides two options for each of three locations where pedestrian crossings might be considered.
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  #68  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2007, 6:09 AM
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I used to run across that highway all the time last year...its a dangerous spot...some of my friends have had close calls there. Good advise: if you have had a few drinks a dark four lane highway is the last place you want to be!
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---Moncton-----------(NB)
(ER)-------209,256---(1st)
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(POPCTR)-108,620--(1st)
(CSD)------71,889---(1st)----------*Be Magically Transported to Downtown Moncton in Autumn*
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  #69  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2007, 3:13 PM
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70 people lose jobs
Dollar | High loonie leads to mill closure

By MICHAEL STAPLES
staples.michael@dailygleaner.com
Published Friday September 28th, 2007
Appeared on page A1

The high Canadian dollar is behind the closure of Fredericton's M.L. Wilkins and Son Ltd. Sawmill.

The move leaves 70 workers wondering what their future will be.

Brent Wilkins, vice-president of the company, told The Daily Gleaner on Thursday he hopes the company can reopen in two to three weeks, but wasn't making a commitment.

"I am very confident and quite optimistic," Wilkins said with regard to that time frame.

He said everything depends on what happens with the Canadian dollar, hovering at or near par to the U.S. greenback.

"It was the final straw at this point in time," Wilkins said.

The company vice-president said most of M.L. Wilkins's exports over the last year have been to the United Kingdom and Ireland. The high loonie has affected those exchanges too, he said.

The family mill, in operation since 1969, had modified its production process to meet new market opportunities.

"Until we have an improving dollar or come up with a better game plan, it's a difficult situation," Wilkins said between meetings Thursday.

With the inventory on-hand, the operation should be able to comply with its overseas orders, he said.

Wilkins said the decision to close was made Wednesday night, and the employees have been advised to file for employment insurance.

A security crew and some office staff will remain on the scene.

The usually busy mill yard looked like a ghost town Thursday with a bare minimum of activity.

A "sorry we're closed" sign hung on the front of the outside entrance to the company's store and offices. A forklift operator could be seen loading bundles of inventory on the back of a flatbed tractor-trailer.

"The forestry industry sucks, but they have tried very hard here," said Corey Fullarton, an eight-year employee.

Fullarton said he believed the shutdown would be short, but admitted the closure didn't come as a huge surprise.

He said things have been "kind of tough" at the mill and morale has been low.

Ken Hardie, manager of the New Brunswick Federation of Woodlot Owners, said the closure was another major blow for members.

"M.L. Wilkins was one of the better customers in the province and bought quite a lot of woodlot wood," he said.

Hardie complimented the Wilkins operation for being progressive in developing overseas markets, but he said even that may not be enough.

"It's extremely difficult times," he said. "It's been every week for the past month now that we've seen mills close down."

Operations in Miramichi, Blackville, Petitcodiac and Juniper have shut down in recent weeks -- with about a third of the 63 mills operating on reduced hours.

Shawn Church, editor of Random Lengths, a U.S.-based weekly publication that provides the wood products industry in Canada and the U.S. with reports of market activity, trends, issues, and analysis, said watchers should prepare themselves for more closures.

"I think that the industry as a whole is bracing for a tough winter and even a tough 2008," Church said in a telephone interview from his office in Eugene, Ore.

"It's very possible that we could see more of this as we move through the winter."

Church said the trend of sawmills closing because of the rising loonie is a Canada-wide problem.

"Mill closures have happened in both the west and the east, with the exchange rate being a major factor in the decision to pull the plug."

To make matters even worse for Canadian mill operators, other factors have also come into play, Church said, with regard to exports to the U.S.

They include an export tax on products going south, and the fact that lumber prices are at an historical low because of a housing recession in the U.S.

"Once the U.S. starts to pull out of this historic downturn in housing and wood products supply and demand changes, prices will rise and, of course, that will help."
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  #70  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2007, 1:09 AM
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as for the second frederick square building by TD Tower I heard construction is supposed to start next spring
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  #71  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2007, 7:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cl812 View Post
as for the second frederick square building by TD Tower I heard construction is supposed to start next spring
Anyone know if there's a picture or model of the new building somewhere?
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  #72  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2007, 8:30 PM
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Anyone know if there's a picture or model of the new building somewhere?
It's a twin of the first one, only with 2 more stories.

Can't find any drawings anywhere.
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  #73  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2007, 12:01 AM
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There is a rough drawing in the skyscraper page if you search for fredericton and its under the proposed catagory. Theres also used to be a model inside the existing building I noticed once when I was in there, but it was a long time ago
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  #74  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2007, 2:15 AM
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Wow...I didnt think there was that much demand for office space in Freddy...I guess "if you build it, they will come" works in this situation?
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(ER)-------209,256---(1st)
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(POPCTR)-108,620--(1st)
(CSD)------71,889---(1st)----------*Be Magically Transported to Downtown Moncton in Autumn*
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  #75  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2007, 6:16 PM
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Here is a concept drawing from 2004. It is where the old tra building is across from the frederick square parking garage. From the addresses it takes up the whole parking lot also. Seeing that city hall is getting quite cramped. Were they thinking about building a new city hall? I've never heard anything about this building until now.
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  #76  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2007, 6:25 PM
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Wow, great rendering!!!
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  #77  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2007, 6:47 PM
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It's an attractive looking building, but I honestly can't see that being a new city hall. It's easily three times the size of Moncton's. Fredericton couldn't possibly need that much space for a city government. As for renting out to the private sector, aren't they already planning/building at least two new office buildings downtown? That's a lot of new floor space for a small city to handle...
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  #78  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2007, 7:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mylesmalley View Post
It's an attractive looking building, but I honestly can't see that being a new city hall. It's easily three times the size of Moncton's. Fredericton couldn't possibly need that much space for a city government. As for renting out to the private sector, aren't they already planning/building at least two new office buildings downtown? That's a lot of new floor space for a small city to handle...
I just said that because in the paper they said they were so cramped. Right now they are trying to get york house. If they can get it from the church. They said they would move alot of the city's offices there from city hall. The paper also said one persons office is in an old bank vault in the basement. lol.
It looks like it might be more condos for downtown because the company that made up the rendering is in the condo business.
http://www.arsamco.com/Projects/QueenStreet.htm
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  #79  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2007, 5:29 PM
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City dials up hundreds of new jobs

By STEPHEN LLEWELLYN
llewellyn.stephen@dailygleaner.com
Published Thursday October 11th, 2007
Appeared on page A1

A new call centre is creating 300 jobs in Fredericton.

Montreal-based Atelka Inc. announced this week the new facility will begin hiring immediately. It will be located in the Brookside Mall.

The company is also creating 200 jobs at a new call centre in Bathurst.

"We will need English-speaking, French-speaking as well as bilingual individuals who are looking for work in those areas," said Francois Lambert, co-founder and chief operating officer of Atelka, in a media release.

Atelka has 1,500 employees in five call centres in Canada, including 200 at a call centre that opened in Saint John in 2005.

"We know that New Brunswick represents a pool of skilled labour that fits the profile we are looking for," said Lambert. "The numbers in terms of jobs will probably need to be revisited soon since our operations keep on growing.''

The company media release states that it has mandates with all telecom companies.

The two new centres in New Brunswick will meet the growing demand for customer service and technical support, the company says.

Atelka said it's involved in inbound, outbound, web assistance, administrative and technical support.

Fredericton Mayor Brad Woodside said he's always thrilled to hear new jobs are coming to the capital.

"There is a need for different kinds of jobs in the community," he said Wednesday evening.

"We have a lot of customer contact centres here in Fredericton and some of them have been here a long time and provide good jobs and opportunities.''

Anthony Knight, general manager of the Fredericton Chamber of Commerce, said the announcement is fantastic news for Fredericton.

"It just goes to show how strong the case is to be made for setting up a business here," he said. "We have highly educated people with great skills.

"Clearly, Atelka has recognized this by establishing 300 new jobs in our community."

Sarah Ketcheson, communications manager for Business New Brunswick, said the government is pleased to hear that a new company is investing in New Brunswick.

"We have certainly worked with the company in terms of helping the company come to New Brunswick and introducing them to people," she said.

Ketcheson said the provincial government provided no funding assistance to Atelka.

The announcement comes weeks after hundreds of call centre jobs were lost in Fredericton and Bathurst when Connect North America closed its call centres in those communities.

But Maryse Ricard, director of communications and marketing for Atelka, said Wednesday there is no connection between her company and defunct Connect North America.

"The centre should be opening in the next few weeks," she said. "We are hiring as we speak."

Ricard said human-resources officials from Atelka will be in Fredericton conducting interviews by the end of the week.

She invited potential employees to send their resumes to the company's website.

The Bathurst centre will probably open a week or two before the Fredericton facility, said Ricard.

"Although we want to open both very quickly," she said.
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  #80  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2007, 5:30 PM
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Leaders hint convention centre news coming soon

By STEPHEN LLEWELLYN
llewellyn.stephen@dailygleaner.com
Published Thursday October 11th, 2007
Appeared on page A1

Premier Shawn Graham and Fredericton Mayor Brad Woodside are both hinting that a major funding announcement about the capital's new convention centre is imminent.

"We are going to be reviewing a number of options for funding this week at the cabinet table," said Graham in an interview after speaking to the mayor's business breakfast Wednesday morning.

"Supply and Services Minister Roly MacIntyre ... is bringing the file forward.''

The city wants to build an $80-million convention centre, parking garage and office tower complex adjacent to The Playhouse between Queen and King streets.

The convention centre will cost about $20 million of that total.

The project has been delayed, awaiting the federal government's financial contribution.

Addressing a chamber council packed with more than 200 people, Graham said he met with Woodside about the project recently and provincial money will start to flow as soon as Ottawa writes a cheque.

"It is time to make this complex a reality in Fredericton," said Graham.

In the interview, the premier said he's still cautiously optimistic that the federal government will help fund the convention centre.

If the project follows the traditional formula then each level of government will pay for one third of the total cost, he said.

Graham wouldn't speculate on what the province will do if Ottawa doesn't come through with its share.

"It is premature at this time to predict if the federal government will not be at the table," he said.

Woodside said he was pleased that the premier renewed his commitment to the development.

"Probably next week the premier and I will be making an announcement which will make it a little more clear on exactly what their commitment is going to be," he said.

"What we would like to do is to do the entire project all at the same time, which would include the provincial government and the announcement will probably be made next week after cabinet meets," he said.

The mayor said the city has already decided to proceed with the convention centre and won't wait for the federal government's funding.

A design contract has been awarded to local engineering company ADI Ltd., he said.

But the mayor also said he's optimistic that the federal government will be at the table.

The possibility of a federal election this fall is adding to the uncertainty about the convention centre funding from Ottawa.

"It is terrible to be having this many elections," said Woodside. "It is very difficult for municipalities and anybody looking for political stability.

"I just hope that a commitment is made before an election is called, if it is called, so we can make our plans."
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