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  #221  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2020, 3:17 AM
bossabreezes bossabreezes is offline
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^Was literally just going to mention MetroPark.

That area could actually use some rezoning and further densification, it's a perfect spot for it.
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  #222  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2020, 4:10 AM
Crawford Crawford is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_denizen View Post
Metro park
Yeah, I think Metropark is arguable, because it's very office parky with a few midrises (and maybe highrises?), but it's also very rail-oriented sprawl. It wouldn't exist absent rail.

And Edison, NJ is pretty old. Neighborhoods near Metropark were developed by 1950. Places like Troy, MI literally built highrises on the former site of cornfields in the 1970's, while there were still adjacent working farms. Toronto built lots of residential highrises on the very edge of development, on rural plots.

There is a highrise called Blue Hill Plaza, in Rockland County, that was built in the middle of nowhere. Basically a 1970's tower in the woods:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_H...:BHPAerial.jpg
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  #223  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2020, 6:45 AM
LA21st LA21st is offline
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I think the NYC metro might be unique in that there isn't a single postwar-originated sprawl skyline. There are tons of "suburban" skylines, possibly more than anywhere else in North America, but they're all built on older urban towns that were enveloped by the expanding sprawl. So the skylines are in White Plains, New Rochelle, Yonkers, Hackensack, Fort Lee, Stamford, Norwalk, Bridgeport, New Brunswick, Morristown, etc. while the real postwar sprawl tends to be woodsy.

The giant corporate HQ of the postwar age are in deeply wooded office parks, often invisible from the public. There are very, very few mid or high rise towers in random sprawl. The NIMBYism is too strong and everything needed to look quasi-rural and cutesy. It's like GE, IBM and the like all wanted to hide.

So, for example, when Troy (suburban Detroit) built up in the 70's and 80's, it came out like this:
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.5621...7i16384!8i8192

But when the Platinum Mile in Westchester (suburban NYC) built up in the equivalent time period, it came out like this:
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.0076...7i16384!8i8192
Morristown? Bridgeport? Norwalk?
Skylines?
That's like saying San Pedro has a skyline.
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  #224  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2020, 9:24 AM
ATLMidcity ATLMidcity is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Buckhead

Ant, you forgot to tell the internationals where Buckhead is located.

Buckhead is about 8 miles north of downtown Atlanta, Georgia but within the city limits.
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  #225  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2020, 6:55 PM
Citylover94 Citylover94 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Morristown? Bridgeport? Norwalk?
Skylines?
That's like saying San Pedro has a skyline.
None of them are huge but White Plains, New Rochelle, and Stamford all have decent skylines for their size. Newark could arguably count as well in that it is part of the NYC metro now.

Boston is similar with essentially no high-rises and only a few mid-rises in suburban environments and the only taller buildings in the metro outside of the core being in cities in the CSA like Providence, RI, Worcester, MA, and Manchester, NH
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  #226  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2020, 6:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Morristown? Bridgeport? Norwalk?
Skylines?
That's like saying San Pedro has a skyline.
They all have intensely urban centers with midrise skylines, so very different from San Pedro. And San Pedro isn't a suburb or satellite city, and doesn't have a corporate base.
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  #227  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2020, 7:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Citylover94 View Post
None of them are huge but White Plains, New Rochelle, and Stamford all have decent skylines for their size. Newark could arguably count as well in that it is part of the NYC metro now.

Boston is similar with essentially no high-rises and only a few mid-rises in suburban environments and the only taller buildings in the metro outside of the core being in cities in the CSA like Providence, RI, Worcester, MA, and Manchester, NH
I know those places are but the three I mentioned def don't have skylines, unless you want to count numerous places in Chicago, LA, DC etc.
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  #228  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2020, 7:15 PM
LA21st LA21st is offline
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
They all have intensely urban centers with midrise skylines, so very different from San Pedro. And San Pedro isn't a suburb or satellite city, and doesn't have a corporate base.
I think we have different standards of intense urbanity.
Morristown? Norwalk? Bridgeport?


This was about skylines anyway.
Their midrise skylines are pretty common in many metro areas, theres nothing that stands out about them.
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  #229  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2020, 1:56 AM
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Houston uptown

Uptown Houston by brijonmang, on Flickr

oh there's the williams tower

Uptown Houston Panoramic by brijonmang, on Flickr
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  #230  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2020, 2:15 PM
Citylover94 Citylover94 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
I think we have different standards of intense urbanity.
Morristown? Norwalk? Bridgeport?


This was about skylines anyway.
Their midrise skylines are pretty common in many metro areas, theres nothing that stands out about them.
They do stand out in the Northeast where outside of DC suburban skylines are an oddity. Overall they don't stand out when compared to the rest of the country I suppose, but they stand out for the region they are located in.
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  #231  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2020, 4:27 PM
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I don't know if I'd call Houston's Uptown/ Galleria area 'suburban'.
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  #232  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2020, 7:51 PM
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I'd say it's like a suburban downtown, regardless of who manages it.
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  #233  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2020, 6:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
I don't know if I'd call Houston's Uptown/ Galleria area 'suburban'.
Right...definitely not suburban. Way too close in. I would consider the developing Energy Corridor skyline suburban, though.
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  #234  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2020, 8:03 AM
ATLMidcity ATLMidcity is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays View Post
I'd say it's like a suburban downtown, regardless of who manages it.
I just watched several drone aerials of Houston's Uptown and I still can't determine whether it's suburban or urban?

But is it walkable or too disjointed for walking?
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  #235  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2020, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
I know those places are but the three I mentioned def don't have skylines, unless you want to count numerous places in Chicago, LA, DC etc.
Can you name these "numerous places", please?

Transit oriented suburban cores with downtown department stores in highrise office towers, and extensive prewar, rail-oriented fabric and rail-oriented commuting patterns. Where are all these alleged places?

In Chicago, Evanston is the only candidate, but I'm not even counting the "Evanstons" (ie extensions of city proper, like Jersey City and Yonkers). I'm talking about satellite cities.

In LA, I don't think there's even one such place. Maybe Long Beach, kinda, but it's more like an Evanston (an extension of LA).

In DC, there are plenty of suburban nodes, but they're postwar urban islands in sprawl. There's no prewar fabric.
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  #236  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2020, 2:26 PM
LA21st LA21st is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Can you name these "numerous places", please?

Transit oriented suburban cores with downtown department stores in highrise office towers, and extensive prewar, rail-oriented fabric and rail-oriented commuting patterns. Where are all these alleged places?

In Chicago, Evanston is the only candidate, but I'm not even counting the "Evanstons" (ie extensions of city proper, like Jersey City and Yonkers). I'm talking about satellite cities.

In LA, I don't think there's even one such place. Maybe Long Beach, kinda, but it's more like an Evanston (an extension of LA).

In DC, there are plenty of suburban nodes, but they're postwar urban islands in sprawl. There's no prewar fabric.

Good God, man. For the second time, this thread is about skylines. Not department stores, commuting patterns.
. For the third time, I was talking about Bridgeport, Morristown, Norwalk. Places you named as having skylines.

Yes, places like El Segundo, Irvine (a few areas there), Santa Ana etc have bigger clusters have highrises than those three places. I won't name every single place, or DC nodes either. I'm sure you'd disregard them for not being prewar or not having a commuter rail station.

Yes, Stamford, White Plains, Newark etc have skylines. Duh. No one is disagreeing with those. Just those other three cities you named.
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  #237  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2020, 10:30 PM
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  #238  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2020, 10:56 PM
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Regent Park near downtown Toronto is quickly developing a skyline separate from downtown, however it may merge with downtown in the future

Aerial-Toronto-109 by _futurelandscapes_, on Flickr
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