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  #361  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2018, 1:00 PM
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  #362  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2018, 1:48 AM
terrynorthend terrynorthend is offline
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Wow. Looking at that population growth chart, if we keep pace with growth between 2015 and 2018, we will reach 1 million by 2021! Consider that it took from 1971 to 1991 to grow by 100k, and then we languished from 1991 until basically just two years ago unable to grow by 50k more. It's simply astonishing growth. Probably all (or most) in Halifax. No wonder it looks busier around town.
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  #363  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2019, 8:13 PM
Colin May Colin May is offline
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Housing is cheaper here and the weather is better, neither of which is the result of any government action.
The best choice is Nova Scotia. As wise investors say 'Value will out'.
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  #364  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2019, 2:06 PM
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Halifax's population increased by +8,544 (2%) from 2017/2018.



https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/dail...-eng.htm?HPA=1

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  #365  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2019, 11:13 AM
HfxExpat HfxExpat is offline
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This is amazing. I remember in 2017, when the 1 July 2016 CMA population stats showed HRM had grown by 6k in the year a lot of people said that we should wait to see if the numbers were a blip or part of a longer-term growth trend.

We've since followed that with 8k growth in 2017, and 8.5k growth in 2018.

I wonder if this three-year stretch of data will give some developers more confidence about proceeding with some more ambitious projects. Eight thousand new people per year need to live somewhere!
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  #366  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2019, 11:31 AM
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This should put the boots to the arguments of anti-development types like Peggy Cameron when they say "Who will be living in all these units?".
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  #367  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2019, 2:07 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith P. View Post
This should put the boots to the arguments of anti-development types like Peggy Cameron when they say "Who will be living in all these units?".
Answer:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...68&postcount=7
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  #368  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2019, 5:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HfxExpat View Post
I wonder if this three-year stretch of data will give some developers more confidence about proceeding with some more ambitious projects. Eight thousand new people per year need to live somewhere!
The apartment vacancy rate in Halifax has been going down too. It used to be around 3-4% and now it is down close to 1%, the lowest it has ever been (CMHC).

This implies that the number of new apartments has to go up by even more than the increase in population growth, because it can no longer be fueled much by newcomers to the city moving into existing vacant apartments.

One thing that changed about Halifax demographics is that the federal government removed the very low caps on provincially-sponsored immigration to Nova Scotia. The cap used to be something like 300 a year (in the Harper era) while SK or MB would have caps in the thousands. I think PEI may have even had a higher cap than NS (Charlottetown is growing a lot too). Now NS is more in line with other provinces.
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  #369  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 4:14 PM
goodgrowth goodgrowth is offline
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Interesting growth recently from Halifax. Some comparison to the Southern Ontario mid-tier cities:

Kitchener - Cambridge - Waterloo (CMA) 567,740
London (CMA) 532,984
Halifax (CMA) 430,512
St. Catharines - Niagara (CMA) 429,036

If Halifax can maintain it's current growth it'll probably stay ahead St. Catharines - Niagara. Question is could it ever catch a city like London given Halifax is much more of a provincial/regional center? I think catching Kitchener is out of the question at this point.
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  #370  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 4:29 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Eventually it will all grow together and Canada will be one big city, then it won't matter who is ahead of who...
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  #371  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 5:58 PM
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I think it's hard to make accurate predictions, because growth patterns are mostly based on migration (not so much births and deaths anymore) and can change very quickly. Population growth in Halifax changed dramatically during the past few years.

I think it's very unlikely that Halifax will pass London within the next 30 years because they are growing at similar rates. A possible scenario would be if London averaged something like 0.5% growth while Halifax averaged 2%, and even then it would take a long time.

The rankings really don't matter though. We are talking about a provincial capital and cities far away in another province. The Ontario cities might compete with each other a bit but Halifax is not a part of that in any significant way. Halifax is increasingly close to being a city state. It's kind of like ranking Tallinn and Gdansk.

One interesting point is that I think even some Canadian cities that were traditionally seen as small places are now becoming fairly substantial. Yet a lot of people seem to still talk about London or Halifax being small towns. Halifax at 430,000 would have been the third most populous municipality in Canada back in 1966.
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  #372  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 6:28 PM
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What's the historical trend comparing Halifax to London? Being from London and spending a lot of time in Halifax as a kid visiting my military father, I always loved comparing the 2, and always thought we were neck and neck with each other population wise. Halifax was always more "big city" to me than London though.
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  #373  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2019, 1:51 PM
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Nova Scotia is getting younger for the first time since 1964!



https://novascotia.ca/finance/statis...f=&dto=0&dti=3

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Until further notice, there ought to be a moratorium on the phrase, “Nova Scotia’s aging population.
https://www.thechronicleherald.ca/op...t-year-360120/
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