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  #101  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2006, 6:41 PM
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Looking down on Utah Valley from Suncrest


Suncrest, looking east toward Box Elder peak/Urban Utah Valley

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmilingBob
900,000+ residents by 2030. Utah Valley in 2030 will look like Salt Lake area right now. We are going to need a lot of new transportation options. I talked to my Utah House Rep. and he mentioned that the Freeway option of the Mountain View Corridor is the most likely option right now. That would definitely increase the need for more high rise office buildings. Someone needs to take the bull by the horns and bring people on board to build some 10-15 story buildings.
You're definately right. I wonder though if it will be downtown Provo. Do you think they would go with a Los Angeles type of situation. Say, if downtown L.A. were downtown Salt Lake and another skyline similar to Century City were put around I-15, "say in Lehi,(Thanksgiving Point), or Pleasant Grove".

Last edited by delts145; Nov 14, 2006 at 3:33 PM.
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  #102  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2006, 7:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
You're definately right. I wonder though if it will be downtown Provo. Do you think they would go with a Los Angeles type of situation. Say, if downtown L.A. were downtown Salt Lake and another skyline similar to Century City were put around I-15, "say in Lehi,(Thanksgiving Point), or Pleasant Grove".
I don't think PG would go for it, but it would look great by the hotel/convention center they want to build. Quick freeway access and the ability to plan it all in advance.

Besides why would it need to be downtown Provo or Orem? But so long as cities get their revenue from sales taxes we'll see more Wal-marts and Home Depots.
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  #103  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2006, 10:11 PM
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I think the whole "Century City" style is already happening. Look at Sandy, Murray, etc. Remember, Sandy a few years ago was running billboards that said "Sandy: The New Downtown." I think that was about the time Larry put up that 9 story office building near 9400 South. Murray has some highrises, PG is getting that hotel (maybe), and I could see Thanksgiving Point getting some taller buildings.

I say go for it, Skyscrapers in the suburbs look cool (as long as they are clustered).
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  #104  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2006, 10:26 PM
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^ I dont agree with you.

Look at Houston TX...


....they have like a 900' building off in the boonies... thats terrible and innefficient planning.



Centralization is key so that mass transit works better as well as roads and other services.

Salt Lakes problem is that the city was started in the wrong part of the valley. Salt Lake City should have been settled where current day Murray is, along the Jordan River.

Provo and Orem are more centralized in Utah County compared to SLC in relation to the SL Valley.

Obviously there need to be comercial nodes around the valley (Thanksgiving Pt, Spanish Fork etc, but I believe that the business core should stay centrally located in and around Provo.
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  #105  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2006, 11:07 PM
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Well, I don't see that "one city" has to be the magical one that gets a downtown. Natural points for skyscraper clusters could be Provo, Ogden, as well as Murray, Sandy, Thanksgiving Point, heck maybe even someday Tooele.
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  #106  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2006, 11:58 PM
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Actually, If I were a bazillionaire I would build a Dubaiesque skyline on the shore's of Utah Lake. Right on the old Geneva site. Wooooow!!!!!!!!!! What a backdrop Timp would make. And then we could build a magnificent suspension bridge over to the other side of Utah Lake. Then we would bore a tunnel through west mountain, and into the new metro area's of Tooele Valley.
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  #107  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2006, 11:58 PM
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Oh, and of course the suspension bridge would be equipped with light-rail!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  #108  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2006, 2:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by i-215
I think the whole "Century City" style is already happening. Look at Sandy, Murray, etc. Remember, Sandy a few years ago was running billboards that said "Sandy: The New Downtown." I think that was about the time Larry put up that 9 story office building near 9400 South. Murray has some highrises, PG is getting that hotel (maybe), and I could see Thanksgiving Point getting some taller buildings.

I say go for it, Skyscrapers in the suburbs look cool (as long as they are clustered).

I think it's a 10-story building. Sure sandy is getting a few new 6-story buildings but just the way they are laid out doesn't make a downtown.
I think Murray with the new IHC tower (15-stories) has a better lay out.
But salt lake will always be the main downtown, even if other cities gets highrises.


As for Provo i wish that city would get that new 12-story hotel insteed of P.G. Why built a highrise in a middle of a field where cows hang out?
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  #109  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2006, 2:42 AM
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[/Quote]As for Provo i wish that city would get that new 12-story hotel insteed of P.G. Why built a highrise in a middle of a field where cows hang out? [/QUOTE]

Didn't you hear? The cow's are being replaced by a BMW dealership.
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  #110  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2006, 3:13 AM
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Just don't say you want the leather package on the new M5 too loudly. Bessie may get mad.
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  #111  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2006, 5:05 AM
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As for Provo i wish that city would get that new 12-story hotel insteed of P.G. Why built a highrise in a middle of a field where cows hang out? [/QUOTE]

Didn't you hear? The cow's are being replaced by a BMW dealership.[/QUOTE]


LOL, where will the cows go now?
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  #112  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2006, 4:37 PM
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[quote=Wasatch_One]^ I dont agree with you.

....they have like a 900' building off in the boonies... thats terrible and innefficient planning.

Centralization is key so that mass transit works better as well as roads and other services.
[quote]

One building 900' tall by itself is like being the only person in an entire section of a ball game. Sticks out like a nickel size zit.
But . . . Wasatch_One is a 900' building better than 9 buildings 100' feet tall? In Houston it could have been 4 buildings 300' tall clustered together. Tall buildings need neighbors, but having one other location, not multiple locations of skyscrapers in a metro area can work.

In the SL valley I think it would okay to have a Sandy area with 20-30 story buildings, but that would be the only 2 places I think it would fit.

In Utah Valley the tall buildings are already in Provo so any new 10+ story buildings should be built around around the other ones. But first I'd like to see something taller than the NuSkin building.
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  #113  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2006, 5:11 PM
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[QUOTE=SmilingBob][quote=Wasatch_One]^ I dont agree with you.

....they have like a 900' building off in the boonies... thats terrible and innefficient planning.

Centralization is key so that mass transit works better as well as roads and other services.
Quote:

One building 900' tall by itself is like being the only person in an entire section of a ball game. Sticks out like a nickel size zit.
But . . . Wasatch_One is a 900' building better than 9 buildings 100' feet tall? In Houston it could have been 4 buildings 300' tall clustered together. Tall buildings need neighbors, but having one other location, not multiple locations of skyscrapers in a metro area can work.

In the SL valley I think it would okay to have a Sandy area with 20-30 story buildings, but that would be the only 2 places I think it would fit.

In Utah Valley the tall buildings are already in Provo so any new 10+ story buildings should be built around around the other ones. But first I'd like to see something taller than the NuSkin building.
You've got to admit, that tower in Houston is one very good-looking building. I wonder if it is just the first of what will be a Century City type skyline. I don't think that it will be standing there all alone for much longer. I would wager that there are other towers being built around it since that picture was taken. It's high time they started thinking more along those type of towers just south of 1st or 2nd south in Salt Lake.
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  #114  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2006, 6:11 PM
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...... To continue from the above.

Man, I hope I'm not the only one to blame for the furor going on over at the crime list thread. I don't know whether to laugh and dive back in, or run the opposite direction and hide out for a while.

I do have a bone to pick with you Utah Valley folk. This frustration with you all is meant as a very big compliment.

I'm going to step back for a moment, and wear the hat of an outsider looking into Utah Valley. I'm a first generation American. An International of European,(French/Persian) background, who spends most of his time as a resident of Los Angeles proper. A large part of my life has been spent as a resident of Europe and NewYork/L.A.

Around two years ago this past June, one of your valley locals took a fairly large group of us through Utah Valley,American Fork Canyon, Sundance etc. We were all from Europe and the East Coast, primarily based out of Washington D.C. As we entered Utah Valley, we were awe-struck by its setting. The exclamation by all, was that it was the most beautifully situated urban valley they had ever seen in the states. Now, these were all people of the world who had been everywhere and pretty much seen everything. The Majesty of your mountains in such close proximty to your metro is inspiring. Ofcourse, I am European,and European's tend to prefer mountains in the mix.

I have been through Idaho several times and find it one of America's prettiest state's. I think all states in the West have many beautiful areas. The people of Idaho are just as likeable as I find most American's. What I find perplexing is that even amongst yourselves,(In Utah Valley) you don't seem to recognize that you live in such an inordinately beautiful urban setting. "This argument, on the other thread about who's daddy is stronger, Metro Utah Valley or Metro Boise," could go on forever. My point is that even amongst yourselves you don't seem to appreciate that the Urban Utah Valley setting blows Urban Boise's setting off the face of the planet. There are many beautiful mountain's in Idaho as Utah and Colorado,etc. But c'mon Utah Valley,your immediate mountains make Boise's look like your foothills. People in Alpine,Provo/Orem and the like, build Golf Course's and luxury home's on those kind of little foothills. This is the opinion of an international outsider looking in.

Ofcourse, if you are just being polite I understand completely. I could definately stand to be a little more tactful at time's. "Hey, what can I say," It will probably take several generation's to get the French out of my DNA.

"Heck", as you Utah Valley folk say. The San Gabriels and Hollywood Hills, which surround me in L.A. are far more picturesque than the hills surrounding Boise. Metro Utah Valley and Metro Boise can build nice development until your Utah and Idaho cows come home. But I don't think Heaven will be building any new mountains around Boise in the near future.

P.S. I am now an American citizen, so feel free to use any Leno/French jokes you want. I get a big kick out of them.
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  #115  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2006, 6:34 AM
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Post New outpatient center in Provo

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GRACE LEONG - Daily Herald

A new $39 million outpatient center that offers same-day surgery, rehabilitation, lab and imaging services is being built at Utah Valley Regional Medical Center in Provo.

Located at 300 W. 1230 North, the new outpatient center on Intermountain Healthcare's 782,000-square-foot campus is scheduled to be completed next December.

Designed by Dallas-based HKS Architects Inc. and built by Big D Construction of Ogden, construction of the four-story, 91,000-square-foot center will start next month.

The outpatient center will be home to 100 employees, 20 percent of whom will be new hires in areas including administrative, surgical, technical and diagnostic imaging support. Intermountain Healthcare has a total of 3,900 employees in Utah County, of which 3,074 are at Utah Valley Regional.

In addition, a three-level parking terrace that accommodates 571 parking spaces is being built for $11 million. This project is expected to be completed by spring 2007.

"Our county has seen tremendous growth in the past five years and that will only continue," said Mary Ann Young, hospital administrator of Utah Valley Regional.

The outpatient center, which sees a 3.5 percent annual growth in patient visits, is projected to receive 70,000 patient visits starting in 2008.

Janet Frank, spokeswoman for Intermountain Healthcare, said Utah Valley Regional's existing diagnostic imaging center is "severely cramped" and the new center will provide additional space to handle patient growth.

"The trend in health care is to deliver more outpatient care," Young said. "Imaging work, on an outpatient basis, will be completed in the building, which means much greater convenience for patients coming in for an X-ray or MRI."

The imaging area, on the first floor of the outpatient center, will offer digital mammography, digital X-ray, MRI and ultrasound services, a 64-slice CT scanner and a PET/CT scanner. Laboratory services will be on the first floor, while rehabilitation and Utah Valley Orthopedics and Sports Medicine will be housed on the second floor.

Six new operating rooms for same-day surgery will be on the fourth floor, while the third floor will house medical offices.

In 2005, the hospital expanded several emergency rooms and added a hyperbaric chamber, which delivers pressurized oxygen to aid patients recovering from carbon monoxide poisoning and other wounds.

In 2002, Utah Valley Regional added its south building, which includes psychiatric, cardiology, speech and hearing, and physical therapy services and also administrative offices.
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  #116  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2006, 12:44 PM
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Post Conference center may also be built in Lehi.

Daily Herald
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CATHY ALLRED - North County Staff

Lehi City may get a 200,000 sq. ft. exhibition conference center if a feasibility study is approved and its results show county commissioners north Utah County is the place to build.

The mayor and council opted Sept. 26 to support Lehi as a site for a center, contingent on receiving matching funds for an approximately $60,000 feasibility study from Thanksgiving Point.

Thanksgiving Point executives haven't agreed to their $15,000 share for the study as yet, even though they are the ones who pitched the idea to the Lehi City Council and again to the Utah County Commission.

Mike Washburn, Thanksgiving Point CEO, said the soonest the Thanksgiving board members could gather to discuss Lehi's counter-proposal on study funding would be some time this week. He was able to present his idea to the Utah County Commissioners the week of Sept. 18.

"They talked with us about considering it," Larry Ellertson, Utah County Commissioner, said in a phone interview. "We haven't taken action on it yet, it's not official ... We probably will have some additional discussion on it."

At least two other municipalities, Pleasant Grove and Provo have announced plans to build a center.

Provo has presented a proposal for a $32 million 80,000 sq. ft. facility near the Marriott Hotel on Freedom Boulevard and 100 North.

Pleasant Grove announced its intentions in building a 100,000 sq. ft. convention center with plans for an Embassy Suites and Hotels complex near the Pleasant Grove/Lindon I-15 interchange.

"We've got three or four of them that are all interested in having studies on them," Ellertson said. "My hope would be we could have the discussion on it over the next month and find out where we are headed."

There is additionally a proposal for expanding the McKay Events Center at UVSC in Orem, he said, so the commissioners will have that option to consider as well.

"I think they are very cautious," Mike Washburn, Thanksgiving Point CEO, said of the commissioners on Sept. 29. "My feeling is they are receptive about exploring other options."

Washburn spoke with Jamie Davidson, Lehi City administrator, a few days earlier about the council's decision.

"The important point is to look countywide for the best location for a convention center," Washburn said. He said he thought locating in north Lehi would take advantage of business from both Utah and Salt Lake Counties.

On Thanksgiving Point property by Electric Park and the Mountainland Applied Technology College campus property, the proposed project would be half the size of the South Town Expo Center but larger than the one Provo leaders are proposing for their city.

"We have resurrected the idea - obviously Provo thinks it should be in Provo but I think the county should have options," Washburn said in his presentation to Lehi Sept. 12.

The center would generate tax revenue for the host city and county and would be built with hotel tax funds.

Washburn said the center would penetrate markets in Provo, Orem and Salt Lake City. He hopes to have the center considered for mult-use, concerts, rodeos and other activities as well as business conventions; and has chosen LMN Architects and Inc., designers of the Exposition Center in Sandy, for the project.

"South Town Expo Center is the second busiest in North America," Davidson, said, adding that their business could spill over to the suggested Lehi center. Washburn said if such a project were announced, more hotel and restaurant plans would likely follow.

"Assuming the Utah County fair remains at Thanksgiving Point that could be a welcome addition to that," Councilman Johnny Barnes said. "I think it's something we definitely ought to look at."

The study would review the economic, demographic and real estate development trends for Utah and Utah County and present an economic and fiscal impact analysis.
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  #117  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2006, 3:11 PM
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Thumbs up Intel/micron Expanding Big Time

N2I.F., Here is that article I promised you regarding the new make-over of Micron. This is a joint venture for Micron/Intel. The Marguis in front even has been changed to Flash Technologies. Alot of activity and expansion going on.

Enjoy,
Delts




The Daily Herald
Cathy Allred

Since the announcement of the IM Flash technologies venture between Micron and Intel in March, the environment of the 2,000-acre Lehi campus has changed significantly from what it used to be - empty lots and silent halls.

Steeped in a flurry of activity, the plant is nearing completion and is at 53 percent of its employment target - 1,850 workers by spring 2007.

The number of new hires changes daily said Rod Morgan, IM Flash co-chief executive officer, as does the number of contractors. There are about 2,000 contractors currently

"It's geen pretty exciting to come together with Intel," Morgan said. "There's quite a bit of stuff going on right now."

Initially a 20-building fabrication plant built for Micron's microchip production in 1997, much of it was left unfinished and remained hauntingly empty in recent years because of changing dynamics in the semiconductor industry.

But the Lehi plant is now the international headquarters for IM Flash Technologies and its NAND Flash memory production using nanotechnology to create NAND memory products, which are electrically re-writeable, non-volatile semiconductor devices that retain memory content when power is turned off.

"I went after this one. This to me is just a great opportunity for the two companies," David Baglee, IM Flash co-chief executive officer, said. "It's the fastest semiconductor business there is and I wanted to be a part of it."

Expectations for NAND memory products, which are used in cell phones, MP3 players, computers, digital cameras, flash drives and handhelds, is more than $14.8 billion in 2006, up 40 percent from 2005. With two of the largest semiconductor companies joining forces, their total investment will be upwards of $5 billion. One of the largest single private sector investments in Utah, IM Flash is expected to provide $1.1 billion in total salary at the Lehi plant, with annual incomes averaging $50,000 per employee.

Stan Lockhart, who has been with Micron since the plant's inception, said he is thrilled with its latest developments.

''The IM Flash corporate headquarters here in Utah County gives us the opportunity to realize the full potential of our Lehi site as a major NAND manufacturing facility. It also shows a long-tem commitment to Utah on the part of Micron and Intel," he said.

Most of the construction is going on inside the facility. The mile-long corridor at IM Flash is bustling with foot traffic, with noise of saws, hammers and drills echoing along the halls. Ducts, plumbing and wiring are being installed along with walls, a lot of walls.

The fabricating clean room is under wraps-- covered with a thick opaque plastic. Workers have to suit up in static-free white coveralls, caps and gloves before entering the room. They are installing the air conditioning system in a adjoining room, and duct tape fencing, and gates guide visitors along the construction route.

It's just a hub of activity, "Lockhard said. "All of this is preparing for what is going to go on in the fabricating room."

West of 22 large buildings at the site, a construction village of portable trailers has been brought in, and a temporary 200-man cafeteria tent behind the buildings feeds a small army of workers. A storage building with its metal frame is being built to the norteast. Because the fabrication of NAND semiconductors needs to be done in a clean enviroment, a one-story , 25,000-square-foot warehouse capable of storing a three- to seven-day supply of chemicals is being built.

The IM Flash headquarters is only part of the economic growth in north Lehi. Below its campus, farm fields are quickly disappearing with homes popping up south of State Road 92. Growth is nearing the 2,000- acre buffer of cheat grass.

Part; of what has been termed "the billion dollar mile" by Kim Struthers, Lehi city planner, IM Flash Technologies is bordered on the south and west by two mammoth planned communities expected ;to attract more than 12,000 residents, or one quarter of Lehi's existing population. Each residential/commercial project comes with its own unique amenities-- Traverse Mountain's The Terrace mall and Cabela's and Ivory Ridge's tennis club, water facility and reception center.

The plant built by Micron in 1995 has facilitated much of the growth by funding the building of Lehi's ;infrastructure, he said.

"IM Flash Technologies will be investing millions of dollars," Struthers said. "This will create a huge employment center for those in Lehi."

If you have'nt been yet.

p.s. Wow, it's amazing to drive along highway 92 from I-15 to the mouth of American Fork Canyon. No where is the incredible growth of the Wasatch Front more evident on one highway. If any of you out there have some extra time today take a Sunday drive. Exit I-15 at the Alpine/Highland exit,(just after you go over the Point of the Mountain). Head east along highway 92, toward the mouth of Am. Fork Canyon. You'll be challenged to take in all of the sights of growth on both sides of the highway. Literally billion's of dollars in commercial and residential in the pipeline. Be sure to take a little extra time to continue on up American Fork Canyon and over the Alpine Loop.(Take a few extra dollars for the Canyon. They charge a toll, which keeps up the Canyons itself,campgrounds,lakes,etc. Looks like it's going to snow here in the next 48 hours, so get it done today. This Canyon is literally one of the most beautiful in the world, "you'll feel like a tourist in Manhattan for the first time." You'll proceed up and over the loop and down into Sundance and Provo Canyon's. Take a moment to stop and walk around the Sundance resort, Again, the views are among the most beautiful in the world. If you still have time you may want to take a left when you come to the Provo Canyon highway. If you have'nt seen Midway yet, it's worth a look for all development geeks. Then you will move on to Park City and down I-80 to Salt Lake.



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  #118  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2006, 1:07 PM
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Housing boom may be cooling,except in Utah County.

Housing boom may be cooling off in Utah

Permits decline 4.5%, but Utah County still hot

By Dave Anderton
Deseret Morning News
The number of building permits issued for new houses, condominiums and apartments is falling across Utah, but in Utah County permits are skyrocketing, according to a new report.


Scott G. Winterton, Deseret Morning NewsNew homes in Herriman. Building permits are down this year in Salt Lake County. Residential permits issued across the state from Jan. 1 through Sept. 30 fell to 20,387, down 4.5 percent from 21,347 permits handed out during the same nine-month period in 2005, according to the University of Utah's Bureau of Economic and Business Research.
The turnaround began in August, when new residential housing permits fell 15.3 percent for the month. That was followed in September by a 13.7 percent drop.
Many Utah cities have seen the number of residential permits issued this year drop dramatically. Permits in St. George fell 43 percent in the first nine months of 2006, compared with that period in 2005. In Herriman, permits fell 50 percent. West Jordan was down 31 percent, and Riverton was off by 10 percent, the report noted.
Counties also saw declines. Salt Lake County was down 12 percent in the first nine months, compared with the same period last year. Davis County saw a 10 percent decrease. Tooele County dropped 13 percent.
Utah County appeared to be the exception, with permits there rising by nearly 21 percent.
"It's just exploding down there," said James Wood, director of the U. bureau. "Utah County will be the leader in new residential construction this year. They have roughly a 600-unit lead on Salt Lake County through the third quarter. I don't think that there is any way Salt Lake County is going to catch them."
The rise in new permits in Utah County was driven by record home building in Lehi, which led the state with 1,361 permits issued from January through September. Also, Eagle Mountain and Saratoga Springs — at 640 and 508 permits, respectively — showed strong increases in the number of residential building permits issued this year.
Deseret Morning News graphic Yet Utah County's gains were not enough to put the state ahead of where it was last year at this time. And with a slowdown looming, the question becomes how long and how severe the pullback might be.
Chris Gamvourulous, president of Ivory Development Co., Utah's biggest homebuilder, said Ivory likely will build more houses in 2006 than it did in 2005. In 2005, Ivory pulled 1,058 single-family home permits.
However, Gamvourulous said, the company remains concerned over the "investor presence" in the Salt Lake market. In October 2005, Ivory Homes began making its buyers sign an agreement, promising that their house purchase would be used as a "principal or secondary residence" and also agreeing to not sell the property for at least one year. Violators are subject to a $25,000 penalty.
"We think in our communities we are going to be OK, but it just depends on how individual builders and developers deal with it in their individual communities," Gamvourulous said. "If they refuse to sell to speculators and investors, then their communities will probably be OK."
Gamvourulous said the slowdown in residential permits does not indicate the sky is falling.
"We're optimistic, but we are very cautious," Gamvourulous said. "Just because things are transacting doesn't mean they are real. It could be speculators. There are recisions."
Richmond American Homes, Utah's second-largest homebuilder, reported its before-tax net income for Utah and Colorado dropped to $25.2 million in the first nine months of 2006, a 49 percent decrease from $49.5 million in net income in the same period of 2005.
But while Richmond American was discounting houses it sells in Virginia by $30,000, the company noted a $95,000 increase in the average selling price for its house closings in Utah during the third quarter, compared to the same quarter in 2005, according to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.
Richmond's price gains in its Utah communities helped to offset fewer closings. The company said closings on Utah houses were down 14 percent in the third quarter, compared to the same period last year. For the first nine months of this year closings fell 9 percent.
"We believe that prospective homebuyers have been delaying home purchases during this period of uncertainty," the company said in its SEC filing. "We continued to respond to the increased cancellation rate and the uncertainty in the homebuilding market by increasing incentives and offering limited time sales promotions, with the objective of improving our sales velocity."
Companywide, nearly half of Richmond American's home orders were canceled during the third quarter, up from 26 percent in the third quarter of 2005.
Kelly Matthews, executive vice president and economist at Wells Fargo in Salt Lake City, said he expects the number of single-family home permits in Utah will drop by 7 percent in the second half of this year, compared to the last six months of 2005. And he expects another 7 percent decrease in permits handed out for single-family homes in the first half of 2007.
"We're still not building too many houses relative to the population and the numbers of jobs that we have," Matthews said. "But we have to be cognizant that clearly what's going on nationwide and what's gone on in Phoenix, Las Vegas and even St. George probably will have some bearing here along the Wasatch Front."
The number of permits for single-family homes in Utah dropped to 15,614 in the first nine months of the year, down 2 percent from 15,938 permits handed out during the same nine-month period in 2005, the U. report said.
Multifamily permits saw the biggest percentage drop, a 12.7 percent decline to 4,185 units compared to 4,795 units a year ago.
The total value of all residential permits in the first nine months of 2006 reached $3.8 billion, up from $3.5 billion during the same period of 2005, according to the U. report. Residential valuations include the cost of materials and labor but not the cost of land or architectural fees.


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  #119  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2006, 1:10 PM
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Housing boom may be cooling,except in Utah County.

posting error.

Last edited by delts145; Nov 15, 2006 at 12:02 AM.
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  #120  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2006, 1:38 PM
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UVSC adds to its campus

OREM — Utah Valley State College's culinary arts program and the college's Small Business Development Center are moving to a building on the former Word Perfect/Novell campus.
The UVSC Foundation purchased the building, 1501 North Technology Way, Building A, Orem, for $2 million, which will be paid over the next 12 years in a lease-purchase agreement.
The former owners of the building, Canyon Park Technology Center, donated $2.7 million to cover the remaining cost.
There are 38 culinary arts students at UVSC. The program can have up to 80 students in the new space. Students in the program will have access to four kitchens. There is one kitchen at the McKay Events Center, the program's current home.
The program, which will move in August, will share the new space with UVSC Food Services. Students will provide food for more than 6,000 Canyon Park Technology Center workers each day. The food service will also be open to the public.
The Small Business Development Center will also move into the new building, expanding its program with the move. The center assists start-up businesses.
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