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  #121  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2006, 1:45 PM
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Post Final funding push for arts site



Work proceeds on the Provo arts center at 451 W. Center last week.


Provo poised to kick off effort to raise $400,000

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News

PROVO — Fund-raising for Provo's Center for the Arts is about to enter its final and perhaps most critical phase.
Stuart Johnson, Deseret Morning NewsWork proceeds on the Provo arts center at 451 W. Center last week. The city is preparing to kick off a community campaign to raise $400,000. A donor has pledged to match those contributions. Together, the funds would raise what is expected to be the final $782,000 needed to complete the performing arts center.
Details of the campaign are under wraps, but city spokeswoman Raylene Ireland said it would begin in January. The center is scheduled to be done in mid-April and to be ready for the first performance by June, said Kathryn Allen, executive director of the Provo Arts Council.
The total price tag for the center is expected to rise from $8.1 million to nearly $8.5 million next week, if the Provo City Council approves the new costs and agrees to pay for them.
Mayor Lewis Billings last week asked the council for an additional $371,377. The council voted 6-0 at a study meeting to move the request to next week's council agenda. One member, Cynthia Dayton, was absent.
The bulk of the money would pay for enhancements to the center, but it also includes $50,000 the city has agreed to pay after it was late turning over the property to Hogan & Associates, the construction company renovating the former city library at 425. W. Center.
The enhancements include an orchestra pit cover, stage curtains, a projector screen and a sound-and-lighting technology pit. They also include upgrades for the ceramic wall and floor tile in the public restrooms, better carpeting and acoustic-spray insulation to enhance sound quality in the performance hall.
An upgrade to seating fabric in the hall and a switch to stainless steel for handrails, posts and glass supports will extend the life of the building and reduce future costs, city finance director John Borget told the City Council.
City Council chairman George Stewart called the upgrades "absolutely essential."
The penalty payment is a result of negotiations. The contract between Provo and Hogan required the city to turn over the project to Hogan by the end of March for the start of renovation and construction.
The property wasn't fully available to Hogan until June, first because of delays in the city's acquisition of the neighboring Travelers Inn, and then because asbestos was discovered when workers prepared to demolish the inn to make room for the center.
The asbestos cleanup added $73,000 to the cost of the project, Provo facilities manager Dick Blackham said.
The city still hasn't settled with Travelers Inn owner Bob Patel, who sold the property to the city last spring without determining a purchase price. Deputy City Attorney David Dixon said the city has offered mediation or arbitration. If negotiations fail, a judge or jury could set the price.
The city offered $875,000. Patel was seeking $1.25 million.
Dixon said the city has paid Patel an undisclosed sum. Borget said the city has set aside $911,000, with the cost split between the performing arts center project and the Provo Redevelopment Agency, which will decide what to do with the motel property not used for the arts center.
The City Council also will vote next week whether to lend $1 million from the capital resource fund to the project. The money would be paid back by USX when it makes the first $1 million in land sales at the new Mountain Vista Business Park. Lots are ready for sale, but Borget said the timing of the arts center project requires the money now.
The interest-only loan would be repaid within three years, with the interest based on the one-year treasury market rate.
The loan would be the second for the city's new capital resource fund, which allows city departments with surpluses to loan money to other city departments and earn interest.
Donors have given pledged more than $4.25 million, including the USX land sales donation. Other funding sources include a federal grant and a tax-increment bond that did not raise taxes for Provo residents.


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  #122  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 12:00 AM
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bump up news filler....................

Okay, so on the north side of the street we have the newly uber active Micron/Intel venture,"FLASH TECHNOLOGIES"




And directly across the street on the south side we have Ivory Homes new mega development,







Welcome to Ivory Ridge, a flagship Club Ivory community.

You will sense the difference as you walk through the neighborhoods of Ivory Ridge. From the beautifully designed brick entry monuments to the state-of-the-art Swim and Tennis Club, you will notice that every detail has been carefully thought out to assure an enjoyable living environment that is a step above any community you have ever experienced.

Without a doubt, Ivory Ridge is the perfect setting to enjoy your new home, new friends and family. Surrounded by the stunning Lone Peak mountain range, yet so close to freeway access, the location couldn't be better, providing quick access to recreational sites all across the Wasatch Front. It's also just minutes from the spectacular views and outdoor amenities of American Fork Canyon and Mount Timpanogos.

Ivory Ridge is a complete community with 435 estate homes, 286 deluxe townhomes, and 114 lofts, all designed in a timeless, Classic American architectural style. We invite you to explore Ivory Ridge and experience all that it has to offer.


Last edited by delts145; Nov 15, 2006 at 12:23 AM.
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  #123  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 2:21 PM
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Utah Heritage Foundation tours American Fork.

BARBARA CHRISTIANSEN - North County Staff
Daily Herald

Members of the Utah Heritage Foundation toured several American Fork sites last week, seeing renovations under way at City Hall, the Bigelow Organ Company and the Northhampton House.

Around 20 individuals saw the changes being made to City Hall. As they toured, a load was delivered to the site, including pieces of punched tin which were created to replicate the original tin punch ceiling in the City Hall.

"The tin ceiling will be restored and will be a beautiful asset," city Chief of Staff Melanie Marsh told the group.

Some pieces of the tin ceiling had been damaged through the years and will be replaced. The rest have been taken down to be put back up when the renovation is nearing completion.

"Everything that can be salvaged is being laid out like a puzzle," said Juel Belmont, a member of the city's Historic Preservation Commission.

"We are trying to get everything back as original as possible," Belmont said.

The original bell was taken off the top of the City Hall in the 1960s and put on display in Robinson Park. It was removed last week to be readied to be replaced atop City Hall.

"Portions of the elevator will look like 1903," Belmont said.

The renovators have determined the newel post atop the east staircase is original and others will replicate it.

Belmont said the historic group is seeking donations to help preserve items.

"There are places to take bricks out," she said. "We will sell the bricks. We are trying to figure out other ways. We want extra money to make sure things are finished as they should be."

Members of the Utah Heritage Foundation also toured the Bigelow Organ Company, which is housed in the former American Fork Second Ward LDS Chapel. Members of the city's Historic Preservation Commission distributed brief histories of those two buildings to those who participated in the tours.

COMMUNITY NOTES

Volunteers honored -- Malcolm Beck presented a report from the Retired Senior Volunteer Program and the work the group had done in the community from April 2005 to March 2006.

There were 99 volunteers who did more than 16,000 hours of work, with an estimated value of $275,000.

They served at the American Fork Senior Citizen Center, American Fork Hospital, American Fork Community Literacy Center, New Friends Quilt Circle, Heritage Care Center and several schools in the Alpine School District. These volunteers are in addition to those who served in the Foster Grandparents program.

Individuals were honored by the group with presidential pins for their service, based on the number of hours.

Bronze pins for 100 to 249 hours went to Carma Cornell, Dorothy Gray, Ray Greenwood, Jessie McLelland, Lorraine Strong, Ronald Strong, Gene Thomas, Ethel Woolsey, Sally Carrier, Gladys Clark, Jolene DeMarco, Rhea Edwards, Kathy Fryer, Elaine Howes, Betty McTague, Carma Miller, Marilou Moser, Glenda Murdock, Furlann Olsen, Jackie Simpson, Dallas Strong, Geri Strong, Beverly Whitney, Thelma Williams, Delma Baldridge, Reva Mezenen, Marilyn Phillips, Linda Pollock, Arlene Sorenson, Orval Harmer and Norma McMillan.

Receiving silver pins for 250 to 499 hours were Maxine Draney, Leola Durrant, Marlene Hancock, Helen Lindstrom, Grant Parker, Melvin Provost, Melba Street, Ted Strongt, Mary Peterson, Verene Thorne, Jeanie Wilson and Necia Doty.

Gold pins for more than 500 hours went to Gloria Parker, Letha Taylor, Lucille Wootton, Connie Hodson, Leone Rutledge, Carmen Martinez, Doris Woffinden, Julie Davis, Doris Murdock and Millie Pace.

Arts Council seeks production staff for musical -- The American Fork Arts Council plans on putting on a musical theater event and is seeking staff members to help determine the production and bring it to fruition.

They are seeking a producer, director, musical director, choreographer, set designer/builder, costume designer, stage manager, house manager and others.

The time frame would be July 15 to Sept. 30.

Those interested may contact Lori England at lori@afcity.net or 763-3081 by July 3.

Residents ask for help -- Some residents in a northeast American Fork neighborhood have asked for help to improve the safety around the homes.

Tom Mackey reported to the City Council that there was a hazardous condition with trucks parking in the vicinity of 530 North and 1100 East.

He said there was an individual running a sod business from a home in the neighborhood.

"This is not just a nuisance but a hazard," he said. "It is a commercial trucking depot."

City officials said they would look into the situation, but that the business predated the development of the area.
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  #124  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 2:44 PM
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Reinventing American Fork's City Hall.



City restores details of building's small-town past

By Susan Whitney
Deseret Morning News

In the application for the National Register of Historic Places, the American Fork City Hall is described as having a "provincial yet earnest manner."
Kim Raff, Deseret Morning NewsA replica belfry will soon be placed on the new roof of the reconstructed City Hall. These days, Juel Belmont can't remember exactly who wrote those words. The City Hall made it onto the National Register back in 1994, so the application was prepared a dozen years ago, and several people helped write it. Over the years, lots of folks have worked to save the building.


Belmont says Wilson Martin may have been the one to notice the building presents itself in a "provincial yet earnest manner." Or it may have been Roger Roper who wrote those words.
But most likely, Belmont says, she herself wrote them. "Because buildings are speaking to me all the time," she says.
Of course buildings do go silent once they are torn down — and Belmont can recite a list of historic buildings in American Fork whose voices she will never hear again. The Carnegie Library, the LDS Tithing Office, Chipman's Mercantile, the old high school ... "I've certainly lost a lot more than I've saved," she says.

This summer, however, she can celebrate. The restored City Hall will reopen in a month or so. It is the largest success to date for the American Fork Historic Preservation Commission.
The Salt Lake firm of Cooper Roberts Simonsen Architects is in charge of the restoration, and architect Allen Roberts recently showed the Deseret Morning News through the building. Roberts says the cost is coming in at less than $1 million. He notes that, at $100 a square foot, the restoration costs significantly less than new construction of a comparable building.


The hall was well worth saving, Roberts says. "It was built in 1903 and is probably one of the oldest continuously used city halls in the state."
The City Hall sits just north of Main Street, next to the 1894 Harrington School. The old Community Presbyterian Church is across the way. This part of town has been the ecclesiastic and government center since the 1850s, when American Fork was first farmed and platted.
Kim Raff, Deseret Morning NewsJuel Belmont is the chairwoman of the American Fork Historic Preservation Commission. Church and government often shared offices in the small towns of the Utah Territory. (That must have made life easier for people like Leonard Harrington, who served simultaneously for 29 years as American Fork's mayor, postmaster and LDS bishop.) After Utah became a state in 1896, even small cities and counties built separate structures for their government offices.
The blueprints for the 2 1/2-story American Fork City Hall were drawn up by James Pulley, for which he charged $50. The building measures 50 feet by 50 feet. The east and west sides are identical, framed by Romanesque arches. The foundation is made of limestone, and the walls are masonry, faced in red brick. When it was first built, the hip roof sported a belfry with Queen Anne trimmings.
Beginning in 1916, the building was painted white. It was sandblasted in 1977, which restored its original color but also removed a portion of the brick, leaving it open to more rapid weathering. At that time, too, mortar was repaired with caulking.
In 1959, the belfry was removed. Some say it had to go so air conditioning could be installed. Roberts says another reason the belfry may have been removed is that belfries are heavy and the roof may have been starting to sag. Interior remodelings in 1959 and 1977 further obscured the original features. Several original doors and windows were removed. Other windows were covered or painted shut.
Still, the City Hall is structurally sound for a building of its period, Roberts adds. When the restoration began, he found no cracks in the walls or foundations. The original stairs were still in good condition, as were the newel posts. The majority of the original windows were still in place.
Kim Raff, Deseret Morning NewsSome of the windows on the second floor had been blocked. Renovators took down the false ceilings and restored it to one big room. This restoration includes seismic upgrades, a renovated secondary staircase and a new roof, designed to support the belfry. The 1977 caulking has been replaced with limestone mortar. Windows have been restored. The restoration has resulted in a building that is 467 percent better insulated, according to the architects.
Contractors took down the false ceilings and discovered that much of the original tin ceiling was still in place. They discovered patches of the original paint, in dark Victorian gold and black, and they found a deep green, as well — probably from the '20s, Belmont speculates. The bell tower's original tin finial was found in the attic, and carpenters used it to design a replica.
Roberts believes people will say "wow" when they first walk into the upper floor. For as long as anyone can remember, the square second floor was divided into tiny offices with low ceilings. Now it is one big room again, with more than 20 tall windows and with bead board and millworked moldings and other pretty details.
The City Council will meet in this room, which can hold at least 100 people. The space will also be used for small concerts and receptions. In addition, the American Fork Arts Council, which will have offices on the first floor, will use the second floor for classes.
Belmont can't help but think everyone who stands in this sunny, high-ceilinged space will hear a whisper from the past. If they don't, there is always the bell. If they hear nothing else, people will hear the bell.
When the belfry was taken down, the Daughters of Utah Pioneers were given the bell, and they placed it in a park. Under their bylaws, Belmont says, they can't give the bell back to the city, but they can allow it to be placed in a new location. Thus in a week or so, the newly constructed replica of the belfry will go atop the City Hall, and the old bell will be placed inside and will ring once again.
Kim Raff, Deseret Morning NewsA craftsman works on one of the Victorian Romanesque windows at American Fork City Hall. A new generation will mark its days with that bell, just as Belmont's mother's generation did. Belmont says her mother, Lois Peters Andersen, told of listening for the bell every morning as she walked to school. If the bell rang before she got to the river, she knew she'd be late.
Belmont's mother passed away this June. So Belmont is especially glad today's schoolchildren will be able to know the City Hall and its bell and its charm. She will think of her mother on the day City Hall reopens — new again, after 103 years.


------------------------------------------------------------

Sources: Utah History Encyclopedia

Last edited by delts145; Jan 11, 2009 at 5:14 PM.
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  #125  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 6:50 PM
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Wow, did anyone else check the numbers in the Tribune's article on Utah's population growth (http://www.sltrib.com/ci_4661360)? From 2002 to 2006 Utah Country added more residents than Salt Lake County! What's going on down there?? Don't answer....I see it everytime I drive past Thanksgiving Point
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  #126  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 8:24 PM
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Just a little photo teaser bumper upper.


Phot By: Eric Godfrey

Over the river and through the woods,and just a few minutes up American Fork Canyon.
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  #127  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 12:31 AM
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I live in American Fork yay!
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  #128  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 1:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Happy Valley Freak
I live in American Fork yay!
I'm an Alpiner! What do you think of the new Meadow's Center? Pretty convenient! I like those roundabouts.
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  #129  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 3:32 AM
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I lived in Highland and Lehi before moving to downtown SLC.

I wish more city planers would use roundabouts. It just makes sense in some locations. Perfect use in Alpine.

AF canyon is one of my favorite mountain biking and snowshoeing canyons.
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  #130  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 4:06 AM
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Yeah, what is up with that? Personally, I go crazy having to live in Utah County right now. I want to get back to Salt Lake County, or go try another city altogether for a while.

Anyone have ideas why Utah County is so attractive? Is it because all the land along I-15 has been developed southbound past the county line now?
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Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 4:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Gardner
I wish more city planers would use roundabouts. It just makes sense in some locations. Perfect use in Alpine.

I agree.... to a degree. For a moderate traffic area, they are excellent! However, there are a few in Portland really should've been a light (may I cite NE Glisan and 39th Ave) http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=e...05316&t=h&om=1

It looks beautiful when you are going though, but at rush hour it's a nightmare! Given, in the inter-city setting, I'd expect traffic backups in excange for the "feel" of the neighborhood. But in the suburbs, this intersection should've had a light instead.
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Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 4:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Gardner
I lived in Highland and Lehi before moving to downtown SLC.

I wish more city planers would use roundabouts. It just makes sense in some locations. Perfect use in Alpine.

AF canyon is one of my favorite mountain biking and snowshoeing canyons.

Wouldn't it be great if they would take one of those big intersections in downtown Salt Lake and make a roundabout? The center could be some kind of historical sculpture/fountain.
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  #133  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 4:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by i-215
I agree.... to a degree. For a moderate traffic area, they are excellent! However, there are a few in Portland really should've been a light (may I cite NE Glisan and 39th Ave) http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=e...05316&t=h&om=1

It looks beautiful when you are going though, but at rush hour it's a nightmare! Given, in the inter-city setting, I'd expect traffic backups in excange for the "feel" of the neighborhood. But in the suburbs, this intersection should've had a light instead.

I'm not familiar with the situation in Portland. Would that be a four or six lane street? I know they work really well in Provo, Lehi,American Fork, and Alpine. These are all busy streets, but only two lane situations.
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  #134  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 5:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Valley Freak
I live in American Fork yay!
Weve got another American Forker amongst us... Ill let him reveal himself if he so pleases...

As for I-215's comment... although I love Salt Lake City (not so much the county as a whole) ...I wouldn't want to live anywhere else but here in Utah Valley...
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  #135  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 6:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
I'm not familiar with the situation in Portland. Would that be a four or six lane street? I know they work really well in Provo, Lehi,American Fork, and Alpine. These are all busy streets, but only two lane situations.
The trouble with the Glisan St. roundabout in 'the PDX' is that it's a double laned roundabout, so it's really a bit unnerving driving through in the left lane the first time. Single laned roundabouts are good, though.
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  #136  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 3:56 PM
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Beautiful new development for Traverse Ridge!








TRAVERSE MTN> Master Plan
Utah Mountain Home Contemporary
Visit here and you'll notice there's something different about Traverse Mountain. Something that goes beyond the thriving, natural location amid rolling foothills and convenient access to the I-15 Freeway. It can probably be best described as a warm, inviting personality that is unique to us.

We call it Utah Mountain Home Contemporary, a distinctive blending of prairie, timber and stone that will be found throughout our community-at our entranceways, in our community and neighborhood parks, in our shopping districts and extensive office campus. It's a refreshing, modern sense of style that blends seamlessly with our natural surroundings while setting us apart from anywhere else. And it's a big part of what makes us such an appealing place to live, work or shop.



Visitor and Information Center
This elevation of our planned Visitor and Information Center demonstrates how the Utah Mountain Home Contemporary will be carried throughout our community


Mountain Park Bridge
This rendering illustrates how the theme will be employed throughout each district in Traverse Mountain



Park and Picnic Pavilion
The unique, rustic charm of Traverse Mountain will be evident in all our parks.

Business District
This dynamic center is comprised of four distinct, architecturally coordinated centers for shopping, working, playing and dining





Triumph technology center
This mixed-use commercial office campus will be seamlessly integrated into Traverse Mountain's commercial center both through its location and application of the architectural theme.

Triumph Technology Park
Located next to technology giants Intel and Micron, Triumph Technology Center is a dynamic mixed-use commercial space offering tenants high-speed Internet connectivity and all the beauty and accessibility our location can provide. This majestic campus, with attractive landscaping and open spaces, makes for a vibrant and exciting location. Where else could tenants and their clients walk out the front door to spectacular views of the surrounding countryside, as well as shopping, dining or a relaxing nature walk?
But the setting is just the beginning of our advantages. Some of our advantages can include the following:


Fiber optic network: many times faster than business DSL.

Multiple Internet backbones and telephone networks.

Bandwidth by the slice to handle the simplest to most complex voice, video and data networking.

"Plug 'N Go Office" service where you plug in your machines and our certified IT technicians take care of the rest—you won't have to hire your own IT people.

Complete management and repair of your servers, switches, routers, PCs, printers, phones, voice mail, email and more.

Customized accounting, financial and payroll systems services.

Deployment of website, database and e-commerce platforms.

Well-educated talent pool from nearby Brigham Young University and the University of Utah.

Contact Kinnon Sandlin or Julia Martindale to become a part of The Triumph Technology Center by calling 801-407-6700.

Download a copy of our Triumph Technology Center overview.

Other Commercial Opportunities
Traverse Mountain offers many opportunities for retail/commercial space, which can be completely customized to your needs. Become a part of this dynamic, growing master-planned community.

Last edited by delts145; Nov 16, 2006 at 4:29 PM.
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  #137  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 4:46 PM
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Round Abouts

I like round abouts. They have them all over the place in England. It took a while to get used to them, but once people get the hang of it they seem to keep the traffic flowing pretty well. Out by Lee's Uncles house they have a giant round about that is surrounded by 4 smaller ones. By the time we were done driving in it I had no clue where we were headed. I don't know how ready we are to have them on major roads, but on smaller roads they are great. It's nice to see them being worked into neighborhoods.
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Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 5:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuiLDing GuRL
I like round abouts. They have them all over the place in England. It took a while to get used to them, but once people get the hang of it they seem to keep the traffic flowing pretty well. Out by Lee's Uncles house they have a giant round about that is surrounded by 4 smaller ones. By the time we were done driving in it I had no clue where we were headed. I don't know how ready we are to have them on major roads, but on smaller roads they are great. It's nice to see them being worked into neighborhoods.
Yeah, I noticed with the one on Lehi's Main street, people were pretty skiddish at first(really kind of funny, as if they were moving into a double jump rope!) But once it had been in a few weeks, it was amazing how well it worked.
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  #139  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2006, 7:00 PM
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Just another Wasatch urban bumper upper


Cascade Peak


Some of my favorite jeep trails are around this mountain. Up the canyon from Provo about 5 minutes!

Last edited by delts145; Jul 30, 2010 at 11:55 AM.
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  #140  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2006, 12:36 AM
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western view of Timpanogos
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