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  #141  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2006, 3:16 PM
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Tahitian Noni of Provo expands globally


New International Headquarters- Provo, Utah



New American Fork Research and Development/Manufacturing Plant


GRACE LEONG - Daily Herald

Tahitian Noni International laid off 130 employees in Provo and American Fork in a move to shift resources from its central Utah office to key regional offices and markets worldwide.

The layoffs, which represent nearly 8 percent of its global work force of 1,650, took effect Thursday and affected departments including training and support, call centers, marketing, and lower executive management in Provo and American Fork.

After the restructuring, the Provo-based dietary supplements maker's offices in Utah, which traditionally provide support for the company's global operations, will have 720 workers.

Its Provo headquarters and call center had 600 workers, while its American Fork research and development, manufacturing, and distribution plant had 250 workers.

The affected workers were given "very generous severance packages, outplacement support services, letters of recommendation and had their health insurance extended for two months," said Shon Whitney, the company's vice president of marketing communications.

The company last laid off 45 workers in 2002 in a cost-cutting move, he said.

"Thursday's cut backs took place across all departments," Whitney said. "Several managing directors and directors were also laid off."

"As we grow globally, it's hard to manufacture and provide international support from just one central location," Whitney said. "We will continue to have more than 700 workers in Utah. But we won't be as centralized as we used to be. We will continue to do R&D, product development manufacturing for North and South America from Utah.

"We're not restructuring the entire organization for cost-cutting reasons this time as much as we're shifting resources and jobs outside of Utah to seven of our key markets in the U.S., Japan, China, Taiwan, Germany, Norway and Sweden."

"By growing our regional support offices, we can move faster as a company and cater to markets in those countries as they are very different from Utah in terms of culture, product, customer service and even technology needs," he said. "We need to put our resources in areas where our sales are coming from."

While the United States is Tahitian Noni's largest market, accounting for 40 percent of its total sales of $530 million this past year, the remaining 60 percent of its sales are derived worldwide.

Japan is the company's second-largest market, accounting for 35 percent of total sales; Europe accounts for between 10 percent and 15 percent, while other markets worldwide account for the remainder.

Whitney said he couldn't immediately specify how much the company will spend on its globalization initiative, nor could he specify how many jobs are being added at its regional offices worldwide. The company is opening a manufacturing plant in China this fall and planning additional support offices in Glendale, Ariz., Japan, Taiwan and Germany.

Last year, the company opened four business support offices each in Japan and Taiwan, and three more offices in Dallas, Houston, Atlanta and New Jersey.

Founded in 1996, the company is operating in 73 markets worldwide and has manufacturing plants in Tahiti, Japan and Germany.

Last edited by delts145; Nov 17, 2006 at 3:23 PM.
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  #142  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2006, 11:35 PM
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SmilingBob SmilingBob is offline
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Originally Posted by BuiLDing GuRL
I like round abouts. They have them all over the place in England. It took a while to get used to them, but once people get the hang of it they seem to keep the traffic flowing pretty well. Out by Lee's Uncles house they have a giant round about that is surrounded by 4 smaller ones. By the time we were done driving in it I had no clue where we were headed. I don't know how ready we are to have them on major roads, but on smaller roads they are great. It's nice to see them being worked into neighborhoods.
I heard a funny story from a cop in Provo. When they put in the roundabout on center and 700 N. it dramatically cut down on accidents at that intersection. The first month they put it in the only accident was from a lady who had lived in Provo all her life. At the accident scene she told the officer and later called into complain about the new roundabout. The officer told her that hers was the only accident that month. . . a year later this lady has another accident at the roundabout. She calls the police station to complain again. She is told that since installing the roundabout accidents had gone down to less than 5 in a year. And would have been only 3 if she would stay off the road.

I like most of the roundabouts, but agree that roundabouts on two lane roads are a mess. There is one off the 1600 North exit in Orem/Lindon by Home Depot. Most people who are in the right lane take the first right, but I've seen two cars go 3/4 around and try to exit. One exited and the other person had to go all the way around again. Arrows on the road would be a simple solution, but an environmental study might need to be conducted and Rocky might protest/sue if he didn't agree with the study.
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  #143  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2006, 4:08 AM
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I'm an Alpiner! What do you think of the new Meadow's Center? Pretty convenient! I like those roundabouts.
Yeah I luv tha Meadows! There's so much more to do now in AF
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  #144  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2006, 2:06 PM
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Xango of Lehi, Utah

XanGo Becomes An Exclusive Sponsor of Thanksgiving Point Institute and REAL Salt Lake

Large-Format Movie Theater to be renamed “XanGo Mammoth Screen – 3D”

LEHI, UT—XanGo, LLC, a Utah company offering a patented dietary supplement beverage, XanGo ™, that is marketed through a network of independent distributors, has reached an agreement to become an exclusive corporate sponsor of the Thanksgiving Point Institute, it was announced today. Effective immediately, XanGo will become the exclusive Nutritional Supplement and Personal Care Product sponsor of the non-profit Thanksgiving Point Institute.

According to XanGo President Aaron Garrity, XanGo’s five-year sponsorship will support Thanksgiving Point’s efforts to provide one-of-a-kind, hands-on educational, cultural and recreational opportunities for children and families. Educational venues at the Thanksgiving Point complex include Thanksgiving Point Gardens, the Museum of Ancient Life, Farm Country, and the Children’s Discovery Garden.

Since XanGo’s sponsorship will help support the operation of Thanksgiving Point’s large-format movie theater housed in the Museum of Ancient Life located at Thanksgiving Point, it will be renamed the “XanGo Mammoth Screen – 3D.”

“This sponsorship is in keeping with our focus to support effective children’s charities,” said Garrity, “and complements the location of our new, 30-acre corporate campus in the Thanksgiving Point Business and Retail Park.”

Garrity explained that from its inception, XanGo has been committed to helping improve the global community—especially by supporting children in need worldwide. As a result, XanGo donates a portion of every sale to Operation Kids, a Utah-based foundation that supports worthwhile children’s charities that are effective in their operations and efficient with their resources. Charities under the Operation Kids’ umbrella include Operation Smile, The Christmas Box House, The Forever Young Foundation, The National McGruff House Network, Children’s Organ Transplant Association and Best Buddies.

Two-year-old XanGo moved its international headquarters to its new location at Thanksgiving Point in October 2004 after purchasing an existing 60,000-square-foot office building and 25 acres of undeveloped land to accommodate its explosive growth. After beginning with 14 employees in November 2002, the company currently employs over 400 employees at its headquarters. XanGo is building two additional office buildings on the site to support its international operations.

“Corporate partnerships such as this are relatively new to Thanksgiving Point,” said Mike Washburn, Thanksgiving Point president and CEO. “We appreciate XanGo’s vision in partnering with us and expect other companies to follow suit. Thanksgiving Point is truly a local treasure and this commitment from XanGo represents a real benefit to the community.

About XanGo, LLC
XanGo, LLC is a privately held company that offers a patented dietary supplement beverage, XanGo™, through a global network of independent distributors. As the first company to market a mangosteen beverage, XanGo has created a new category of dietary supplements. Headquartered in Lehi, Utah, XanGo currently has operations in the U.S., Japan, Canada, the UK, Hong, Kong, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Trinidad and Tobago. For additional information, please visit www.xango.net.

About Thanksgiving Point Institute, Inc.
Thanksgiving Point is the cultural gathering place for the community, promoting the renewal of mind and spirit in a beautiful and family-friendly setting. A not-for-profit organization, Thanksgiving Point is dedicated to providing guests a one-of-a-kind, hands-on opportunity for discovery and an entertaining educational experience in a variety of arts and sciences. Thanksgiving Point is located at 3003 North Thanksgiving Point Way in Lehi, just west of Interstate 15 at the Alpine/Highland exit. For more information call 801.768. 2300.







Xango's new building, "B" to function as the call center

XANGO INKS HISTORIC DEAL WITH REAL SALT LAKE (MLS) TO BECOME FIRST SPONSOR OF MAJOR-LEAGUE U.S. PROFESSIONAL TEAM SPORTS JERSEY FRONT

Partnership between RSL and Mangosteen Nutritionals Company First of its Kind, Introducing European Pro Soccer Model to U.S. Division I Major League Soccer

SALT LAKE CITY (Friday, November 17, 2006) — Marking an unprecedented development for U.S. professional sports and Major League Soccer, XanGo, LLC and Real Salt Lake today unveiled their landmark jersey-front title sponsorship deal, the first of its kind in major-league U.S. professional team sports. Beginning with the 2007 MLS season, slated to kick off on April 7, 2007, the XanGo name will be emblazoned across the chest of Real Salt Lake’s adidas/MLS game jerseys, following the European pro soccer model.

XanGo President and CEO Aaron Garrity, Real Salt Lake Owner David W. Checketts, and eight RSL players wearing the new XanGo-branded jerseys gathered onstage today at the Salt Palace Convention Center to make the historic announcement. Applause and cheers followed from nearly 10,000 attendees at the company’s annual convention, known as “XanGo Revolution” in Salt Lake City.

"It is a wonderful milestone for RSL to be the first MLS franchise to secure a jersey-front sponsor," said Checketts. "XanGo is a strong supporter of professional soccer in Utah and the growth of our franchise nationally and globally,” said Checketts. “XanGo’s aggressive vision and innovative commitment to become the first company to sponsor a professional U.S. team sports jersey meshes well with the RSL spirit and mission. Jersey-front partners across the globe are intimately linked with the team identity and brand, representing a very personal relationship between the two organizations. XanGo’s healthy lifestyle brand energy is an ideal fit, and the entire RSL organization is proud to bring the XanGo name to our field of play.”

Utah-based XanGo is the recognized creator and international market leader of nutritional supplements from the mangosteen, a prized fruit from Southeast Asia.

“XanGo’s pioneering commitment to Real Salt Lake and Major League Soccer represents a significant threshold in the continued growth and popularity of professional soccer in the U.S.,” said MLS Commissioner Don Garber. “Major League Soccer is thrilled to have XanGo as a valued partner, and we look forward to other leading global brands aligning themselves so strongly with our teams and players.”

XanGo’s multi-year deal with Real Salt Lake includes signage and promotional opportunities at the team’s current venue, Rice-Eccles Stadium, as well as the team’s sports and entertainment venue in Sandy, slated to open July 4, 2008. Each year, Real Salt Lake’s international exhibition calendar will feature the XanGo Cup, which debuted on August 12, 2006, between RSL and Real Madrid, drawing more than 45,000 fans and 250,000 television viewers domestically. Select adidas/RSL training and off-field gear will also promote the XanGo/RSL partnership.

“XanGo is honored to support Major League Soccer, Real Salt Lake, its players, and soccer fans worldwide with this jersey sponsorship,” said Garrity. “We pledge to be a great, active fan to our home team, taking leadership in the prosperity of professional soccer. As Real Salt Lake competes domestically and globally, it will receive passionate support from millions of XanGo’s distributors and consumers worldwide.”

Last edited by delts145; Nov 18, 2006 at 2:16 PM.
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  #145  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2006, 2:03 PM
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Thumbs up Looks like the Coug's are finding their mojo again! MWC CHAMPS!!!


photo: Jeffery D. Allred
: BYU quarterback John Beck (12), linebacker Cameron Jensen (35) and head coach Bronco Mendenhall celebrate the team's conference title Saturday.

Outright victory — Cougs celebrate but say they're far from content

By Jeff Call
Deseret Morning News

PROVO — Seven down, one to go. BYU's quest for Mountain West Conference perfection rolled on Saturday afternoon at LaVell Edwards Stadium, where the No. 23 Cougars smashed New Mexico, 42-17, and claimed their first outright conference championship since 2001.
During the postgame celebration on the field, BYU received the championship trophy from MWC commissioner Craig Thompson and accepted an official invitation to the Las Vegas Bowl.
Amid the festivities, coach Bronco Mendenhall emphasized that he still isn't satisfied. "We have another game," he deadpanned to the roar of the crowd.
As if anyone had forgotten. Next week, the Cougars (9-2, 7-0) visit arch-rival Utah.
Quarterback John Beck also addressed the crowd, noting that his team isn't looking ahead to the Las Vegas Bowl. "We're looking up north," he shouted. "Beat Utah!"
BYU, winners of eight consecutive games, enters Rivalry Week on the heels of another memorable day in Provo. While the Cougars clinched at least a share of the MWC title more than a week ago, they wanted the crown all for themselves.
"I feel honored to be able to represent this football team in re-linking a program to championship football, which is what the expectation here at BYU is, which we all know and understand," Mendenhall said. "It's a great day for our program and a great day for these young men and the work they've provided."
"Some guys are going to do some extra hand curls to make sure their hands are strong enough to support the (championship) ring that we're going to be getting," running back Curtis Brown joked. "We're just going to enjoy this moment."
Brown, who gained 124 yards on 13 carries and scored two touchdowns, became the school's all-time leading rusher. Brown broke the record on a 49-yard TD run on BYU's first offensive series.


Keith Johnson, Deseret Morning NewsBYU players and fans hoist the Mountain West Conference championship trophy after the Cougars beat New Mexico on Saturday. The Cougars also honored their 25 seniors playing in their final home game, and with the win, they completed their first undefeated home campaign in five years.
While BYU has been overwhelmingly dominant all year long at LaVell Edwards Stadium, New Mexico provided some actual drama.
The first half was almost a carbon copy of the Cougars' other five home victories. BYU scored on three of its first four possessions, which included spectacular touchdown passes from Beck to freshman wide receiver McKay Jacobson (20 yards) and senior tight end Jonny Harline (71 yards).
The Cougar defense, meanwhile, forced three New Mexico turnovers.
BYU led 28-3 at halftime, then the plucky Lobos scored a touchdown in the first minute of the second half, striking from 80 yards in two plays. On BYU's next possession, Quincy Black intercepted a Beck pass and returned it 88 yards for another TD.
Suddenly, it was 28-17 midway through the third quarter.
"We knew they wouldn't quit. We knew they'd play hard in the second half," Mendenhall said of UNM. "That's what they've shown all year. That's who they were again (Saturday). But to our players' credit, they withstood their second-half barrage, so to speak, maintained their composure and made enough plays on both sides of the ball to have a convincing victory, which is what it was."
BYU responded after Black's pick-for-a-score with an 84-yard drive, capped by a 4-yard touchdown pass from Beck to Matt Allen to post a 35-17 advantage.
Even after the Cougars extended their lead to 42-17, the Lobos refused to go away. On their final possession, they drove from their own 12-yard line down to the BYU 4. On fourth-and-goal, with less than 30 seconds remaining in the game, the Cougar defense held and the crowd went crazy.
"It was my last game in this stadium," said senior Cameron Jensen. "I didn't want to go out giving up a touchdown on my last play."
BYU's defense gave up only 10 points, but it did allow 418 yards of total offense to New Mexico.
"This game will help us move forward and address some areas where we can improve," Mendenhall said. "As I've told our players all along, we're not finished yet ... and that was made clear tonight."
Though the Cougars weren't perfect against New Mexico, Lobo coach Rocky Long was impressed.
"I've been lucky enough to be around some good football teams and play against some good football teams," Long said. "It's too bad (BYU) had struggles the first part of the season, where they didn't make field goals, because they're as good as any team in the top 10. I promise you, they are."

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  #146  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2006, 2:26 PM
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Thumbs up Cougar Athletic and Training Facilities.

BYU Athletic Department























BYU’s intercollegiate program of 10 men’s teams and 11 women’s teams has become one of the top athletic programs in the country, repeatedly achieving national rankings and recognition. The Cougar men’s teams have claimed NCAA Championships in volleyball (1999, 2001, 2004), football (1984), golf (1981) and outdoor track (1970), as well as two NIT Championships in basketball (1951, 1966). The women’s teams have won four NCAA titles in cross country (1997, 1999, 2001, 2002) and have four runner-up finishes as well. In 2001, the women’s basketball team advanced to the Sweet 16 at the NCAA Tournament, and in 2003, the women’s soccer team made a run to the Elite Eight.

From 1962 to 1999, BYU athletic teams dominated the Western Athletic Conference, winning more than 60 percent of the Conference Championships. Since helping organize the Mountain West Conference in 1999-2000, the Cougars have won 61 of 114 conference regular- or post-season titles. BYU teams claimed 11 regular- or post-season MWC Championships during 2004-05, including men's swimming, softball, women's tennis, men's and women's outdoor track, men's and women's indoor track and men's and women's cross country.

In addition to team excellence, BYU athletes have received individual national awards and recognition, including a Heisman Trophy, Doak Walker Award, two Outland Trophies and two national basketball player-of-the-year awards. Numerous Cougars have also won national player-of-the-year or MVP honors in their respective sports. In 2005, former San Francisco 49er quarterback Steve Young was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Young is the first Cougar to receive this distinguished honor.

Success in BYU sports goes beyond athletic competition. In 2005, the Mountain West Conference named 252 BYU student athletes to the Academic All-Mountain West Conference Student Athlete teams—111 more than the next highest school. Since 1966, 48 BYU student athletes have received NCAA Postgraduate Scholarships, ranking the Cougars in the top 10 nationally in awards received. Since 1977, seven BYU athletes have been honored by the NCAA as Top Eight Award recipients, an award given to just eight student athletes annually. The award recognizes character as well as athletic and academic achievement. In addition, three former athletes have been named NCAA Silver Anniversary Award winners and three have been inducted into the CoSIDA National Academic Hall of Fame.

Facilities

Athletic facilities at BYU are among the best in the nation, including major sports complexes that provide for practice, training and events. Completed in 2004, Student Athlete Building and Indoor Practice Facility help students achieve excellence in academics and athletics and allow BYU Athletics to continue recruiting at the highest level. The 116,000 square-foot Student Athlete Building includes a nutrition center, a strength and conditioning complex, the Student Athlete Academic Center and an athletic training center. It also houses the football program, as well as Legacy Hall-a 7,400 square-foot museum that showcases the history, tradition and success of the BYU Athletics program. The 106,000 square-foot Indoor Practice Facility serves as a practice arena for football, soccer, golf, baseball and softball, as well as for physical education classes and BYU’s extramural and intramural programs.

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  #147  
Old Posted Nov 20, 2006, 12:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Valley Freak
Yeah I luv tha Meadows! There's so much more to do now in AF
Hey Paesano,

Isn't that great what they did with the old Town Hall. They even put the old bell tower back. It hadn't been in its rightful place in decade's.
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  #148  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2006, 1:39 PM
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Thumbs up Relief is on the way for Lehi congestion

Relief is on the way for Lehi congestion

By Amy Choate-Nielsen
Deseret Morning News

LEHI — For drivers who were blocked for three hours last week by a Union Pacific train, or who regularly face traffic delays on Main Street in Lehi, help is on the horizon.


Deseret Morning News graphic

Utah County transportation planners, local mayors and the Utah Department of Transportation are working together to provide relief for Lehi's Main Street — and they estimate the first project should be completed in about five years.
"I think that northern Utah County's time has come, and we're seeing a lot of funding on our way," said Dave Nazare, UDOT Region 3 director. "I think the people of northern Utah County have been very patient, but their time has come."
UDOT's most likely option for relieving Lehi's Main Street is a new four-lane road that would connect I-15 to Saratoga Springs by way of 1000 South in Lehi. In this scenario, drivers could access the road from the American Fork Main Street exit on I-15.
The second option is a new four-lane road from I-15 to Redwood Road by way of 2100 North in Lehi. Both roads would require reconstruction of their respective I-15 connections.
Either way, Lehi is anxious to have plans in the works, and the sooner the better.
"We're very concerned about the east-west connections," said Jamie Davidson, city administrator for Lehi. "We feel like, now, especially as our state plans to grow and there are plans to update and improve I-15 with construction in the area, we feel it is imperative to improve the east-west corridors before we begin the I-15 construction."
Currently, Lehi's Main Street serves as the main roadway to rapidly growing cities Saratoga Springs and Eagle Mountain, home to about 16,000 residents. The road also connects one side of Lehi to the other.
According to Chad Eccles, transportation planner for the Mountainland Association of Governments, the government agency in charge of transportation planning in Utah, Wasatch and Summit counties, Lehi Main Street is among the most congested roads in Utah County.
"Even on a good day, it's pretty bad," Eccles said.
When a Union Pacific train broke down last week and blocked the road, Davidson said the city was worried that police officers and other emergency services would not be able to access the other side of town. Such a situation did not arise, but the possibility concerns the city.
"We have gotten a number of calls expressing obvious frustration," Davidson said, referring to residents' response to the train failure. "But a lot of the frustration is consistent with frustration that we hear every day from the residents, and that is, 'Why can't you do something about this situation?"'
According to Eccles, future roads that will travel from the east to the west across the county will have have a different elevation, to go over or under existing train tracks. A differentiation would increase traffic flow and improve the safety of the road, Eccles said.
Although 1000 South and 2100 North are both potential Mountain View Corridor connectors, the roads have been separated from the much larger project. According to Nazare, the roads will eventually have to be built, no matter what, so the projects can move forward.
MAG estimates put the cost of road construction for 1000 South at about $110 million. Because of the recent sales tax increase, Eccles estimated MAG now has enough money to fund the road construction.
After a decision is made between which of the two projects to begin immediately, UDOT will then conduct an environmental impact study for about 18 months. After the study is completed, the road could potentially be finished in about three years, or by 2011.
In the meantime, locals are finding their own ways through Lehi's back streets.
"Who likes to sit in traffic if you don't have to?" said Ellen Parker, wife of Saratoga Springs mayor Timothy Parker. Ellen Parker was stuck behind the train on her way to pick up her daughter only momentarily before she veered off and bypassed the tracks by another route.
Parker says the delay still made her about an hour late, but she made it through. She knew what roads to take because she uses them regularly in heavy rush-hour traffic, Parker said.
"I may be just more impatient than some, but I hate idling in traffic," Parker said. "The amount of time it takes to go around the back way isn't always necessarily shorter, but I would rather be moving than sitting. That's just me."


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  #149  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2006, 1:45 PM
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Post Y. may raze dorms over break

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — Demolition day for two of seven landmark Deseret Towers dormitories at Brigham Young University could come during Christmas break after workers punched a hole through an exterior wall of W Hall on Tuesday.


Stuart Johnson, Deseret Morning News
Preliminary demolition of W hall at the Deseret Towers on-campus dormitories at BYU started Tuesday as crews punched a whole in the outside wall of W Hall.

"They are looking at the best way to bring the building down," BYU spokeswoman Carri Jenkins said. "They are doing some preparation work, but demolition won't take place until about the third week of December to the end of December."
The university has also decided to vacate the other five towers at the end of the school year in August, Jenkins said. The dorms will remain open for the 2007 Education Week, which brings more than 20,000 adults to campus from around the world.
One exterior wall at W Hall came down Tuesday morning as a crew used heavy machinery to expose the bottom floor for review by demolition experts. A guard was posted to keep students and others from wandering into the condemned building until a fence is erected.
Workers have been stripping the building of usable materials and wiring for months, since BYU announced in June that it would raze W and V halls. W Hall is the newest of the seven towers that house single students, built in 1978. V Hall was built in 1969. Both were serving as men-only dorms.
The university vacated the halls in August. BYU made up for the loss of on-campus single-student rooms by converting part of Wyview Park to single-student housing. Wyview Park had experienced a growing number of vacancies as a married student complex.
It appears likely the rest of Wyview Park will be converted to single-student housing by the end of the summer.
The other five Deseret Towers buildings are in operation, with women in S, T and U halls and men in Q and R. BYU plans to vacate them, probably by the end of next summer. The university hasn't decided when it will demolish the buildings.
College students now prefer apartment-style living over dorms, BYU concluded after looking at national and local studies. There are a large number of vacancies at Deseret Towers, with no women living on the second floors of T and U Halls.
BYU has not decided whether it will replace Deseret Towers or what else might be done with the site. The university began overhauling its on-campus housing in 1992 and completed a major renovation of Helaman Halls in 2005.
Deseret Towers is dated and ill-equipped for retrofitting with the technology-based needs of college students. By the time the remaining towers close in August, the new Alpine Village project west of campus is scheduled to be completed. BYU has a contract with Alpine Village to provide housing exclusively for BYU students.
The university signed a contract with Centennial Apartments just south of campus to do the same.
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Old Posted Nov 21, 2006, 1:49 PM
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Post Pleasant Grove to get it's share of tax pie



By Amy Choate-Nielsen
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — No doubt it won't be a laughing matter for guests to Utah Valley hotels come April 1 when hotel bills increase because of a no-joke tax increase that will kick in across the county.
Utah County commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday to increase the county's transient room tax rate by 1.25 percent in order to generate more funds for tourism promotion and convention center construction.
Several Provo hotel representatives voiced their support of the tax increase at a public meeting Tuesday, but no entity was happier than Pleasant Grove, which signed an interlocal agreement with the county that will return a portion of the increased tax revenue to their city.
"We are so fortunate," said Pleasant Grove Mayor Mike Daniels. "I think (the commissioners) did the right thing. They cut where it was appropriate and they gave where it was appropriate, and we're very pleased."
According to the interlocal agreement unanimously approved by county commissioners Tuesday, Pleasant Grove will receive 2.25 percent of the transient room tax produced only by their proposed convention center project, as well as 75 percent of the site's incremental property tax increase over a period of about 25 years.
The city will use the money to pay back a debt the city incurred to purchase 50 acres, located off of I-15 at exit 275. The city is giving the land to John Q. Hammons, a developer, for the construction of an elite convention center, with rooms that are expected to cost about $240 a night.
Although the project is expected to break ground in May 2007, the project won't begin generating tax revenue until 2008.
According to Pleasant Grove economic development director Richard Bradford, the county collects $36 a year in property taxes on the land.
Once the project is finished, Bradford estimates the county will receive $995,998 a year from the property after the city's portion has been deducted.
"It's financially a good decision for the county," Bradford said. "It's going to open up a new destination project to bring new tourism dollars that aren't coming here now to the existing hotels."
Because Pleasant Grove will be collecting tax money only from its 50-acre project site, the interlocal agreement between the city and the county should not exclude any other convention center projects from coming to fruition, said County Commissioner Steve White.
In White's opinion, the commission passed the room-tax increase as a preliminary step, in order to provide more funds to pay for a convention center in Provo.
"I would think the (convention center plans) coming forth from Provo city would just fly right through," White said. "I'm saying that's my opinion. On a reasonable timeline, it will come to fruition."
According to White, the county should receive $453,750 from the tax increase on top of about $1 million that is currently generated from the transient room tax on existing properties. After April 1, 2007, the total transient room tax in Utah County will be 4.25 percent.
Though Pleasant Grove's 50-acre project will be exempt from providing its room tax increase to the county for a convention center project, Provo doesn't seem to mind.
"It's fine with all of us," said Provo City Council chairman George Stewart. "From our standpoint, we're supportive. If, in fact, (Pleasant Grove) can pull that project together, we don't see any impact on us doing one here. ... I view what happened today very positively."


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Old Posted Nov 21, 2006, 4:19 PM
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Delts145, with you around there is no need to even read any local newspaper since you copy and paste countless articles into these threads.
Maybe you should start a Utah Horoscope thread.
Seriously.
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  #152  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2006, 6:08 PM
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I'd consider this a good thing, Northernlad. I don't want to spend $20 on a newspaper subscription. This way I get all the news for free!

Not to shift gears too much, ,but BYU's "Daily Uni-farce" (Universe) had a HUGE front page spread on Monday about a downtown Provo makeover. It's not nearly to the scale of the downtown Salt Lake City one, but it sounded similar. I think the new Provo arts center (mentioned in other places).



Downtown Provo Gets a Facelift
By Sarah Wofford - 20 Nov 2006
Marvin Kimble

Through major renovations, city officials hope to turn downtown Provo into a 24-hour town where people can work, play and live.

Mayor Billings said within the next three to five years the image of downtown Provo will change dra-matically. Citizens will see more housing built, another full-service hotel and an increased amount of commercial office space.

“If you were to take a snapshot of downtown Provo now, and come back in three years, the town will be dra-matically improved,” Billings said.

There are six prongs that together turn the historic downtown center into a more ideal district: government, business, finance, legal jurisprudence, arts and housing, Billings said. With these ideas in mind, several new structures are in the making for downtown.

The first project to be completed is the performing arts center, which will be built where the old Provo library building currently stands.

A stunning anchor, planned for the west Center Street entrance, will attract people to its events.

“We need to get the nightlife back into downtown and get people there at night,” said director of redevelopment Paul Glauser. “This performing arts center will help us achieve that.”

The conference center will be built as an addition to the Marriott hotel and is another major addition to downtown. Completion of this con-ference center is expected somewhere in the two-year mark.

Building non-chain shops and restaurants around the conference center will help create the feeling of escape for those who are attending meetings there. Businesspeople can walk to different places, like supportive retail, surrounding the area.

Property and sales taxes will not be raised for these improvements to happen, Glauser said. Rather, in-creased hotel, restaurant and car rental taxes would pay for them. The people who will use the new conference center will pay for the improve-ments.

City officials have employed Chris Lineberger, a specialist in downtown redevelopment planning, to assist with the task of revamping downtown Provo. Billings said he heard about Lineberger’s work in cities such as Albuquerque and Pasadena and was interested in applying his methods.

Eventually, Lineberger helped city officials put together a strategic plan with the downtown stakeholders, which is now known as the “Lineberger Initiative.”

The “Lineberger Initiative” includes housing above and next to retail shops, as well as parking tucked away out of sight, such as below and behind other buildings.

“The old downtown look is what we’re trying to restore,” Glauser said.

Before starting the planning, Dan Jones and Associates polled Utah County residents and discovered that with the right improvements, they would want to live downtown.

“Housing improvement along with more entertainment and restaurants is a sure way to get people to be downtown,” Glauser said.

Housing, offices and retail are also development goals that the Utah County citizens agreed would make them more likely to move downtown.

A problem that comes with want-ing to make so many changes is trying to get several stakeholders to agree on a plan. Some of the owners of the downtown shops have lived in Provo for many years, and their shops are part of their family heritage.

The current buildings in downtown Provo will not be torn down. Instead, things like window treatments and restoration will help the new buildings look a similar style to the historic structures.

Lineberger agreed Provo already has an ideal downtown area. At this point it just needs to evolve into something better and more inviting, he said.

Billings said the city has other plans for revitalizing downtown Provo that they have not yet revealed to the public.

“Downtowns go through life cycles, and ours started the day after Provo was founded,” Billings said. “Provo downtown is strong compared to its past.”

In the 1980s local leaders and organizations such as the Provo Chamber of Commerce decided they did not want Provo to regain its status as the retail center of Utah County, but wanted it to become the heart of business, government and finance. Over the last few years, a serious development plan has been in the works and is starting to take form.

“We want to bring back the vi-brancy and activeness that has died through the years,” Billings said.
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  #153  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2006, 12:53 AM
N2I.F. N2I.F. is offline
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Exclamation Good Work, Useful Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northernlad
Delts145, with you around there is no need to even read any local newspaper since you copy and paste countless articles into these threads.
Maybe you should start a Utah Horoscope thread.
Seriously.

Isn't the work that Delts145 puts into this site awesome! He/she saves me so much time (and money) not having to subscribe to so many newspapers or even read all this info online. I don't know how he/she gets it all done to know so much about all the really cool new developments, in Utah and elsewhere, and post them sometimes in more than one place. For me, that is a time saver. My free time is very limited, so I appreciate it when Delts cross-references me say from a Salt Lake Development thread to this one in Utah County or elsewhere, where I can get the best information.

Smiling Bob had posted a comment on a thread about projects in Idaho Falls yesterday that made me want to look at this Utah Valley one in more detail today. All about where Costco is placing stores - very interesting and useful in thinking about planning, for those of waiting to see where Costco decides to locate in Idaho Falls.

You know, Northernlad, if Delts could predict Horoscopes as well as he/she provides other solid information in the posts placed on this great thread as well as so many others, then I say go for it! I could use some extra good luck put in my Horoscope this year.

What a great idea, Northernlad, so glad you realize how really bright Delts is. Are you into Horoscopes? Except you said "Utah Horoscopes" so if I'm anywhere but UT, does that mean any information given wouldn't be valid? Northernlad, I'm convinced that when I can, I should read more or your comments, as you seem to have some interesting ideas.

Thanks to all who posted such great info on this Utah County thread. I'd gotten so far behind, that I didn't know when I could get caught up. This thread, and Delts comments sure help me get informed a little faster. Keep up the good work!
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  #154  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2006, 1:11 AM
N2I.F. N2I.F. is offline
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Question Location?

Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
I'm an Alpiner! What do you think of the new Meadow's Center? Pretty convenient! I like those roundabouts.

Where is the new Meadow's Center? Sorry, I haven't kept up with that like I would have liked. Are they like the roundabouts the City of Idaho Falls started using about 3-4 years ago? One was placed in Taylor's Crossing, with the commissioned eagle, mountain lion and other pieces, made of bronze in the middle of the roundabout. They are actually the largest bronze pieces in the U.S. Kind of interesting idea and actually quite beautiful to look at art in a roundabout, except there seems to be too much to look at if one is just driving and not pulling into a parking lot for an appointment.

There are great pictures of Taylor's Crossing and these pieces at www.IdahoFallz.Com. Specifically, this is the address for the bronze pieces: http://idahofallz.com/2006/08/27/tay...bronze-eagles/ If that doesn't work, there is a search at the top of the page (above the chat box) and if one just types in Bronze and makes sure search Idaho Fallz.Com is checked, instead of Google, that should bring up this series of great photos.

Unfortunately, I don't think any photos are posted in any threads here, and can't be currently, due to some "confusion." Let's just leave it at that, but please check out www.IdahoFallz.Com when you can and look at all the great photos, not only of T.C. but other sites. There may even be some pics of the roundabout in winter with the different colored lights on the cascading water in this roundabout. I don't know if McNeil will do that again now that the Bronze work is there.

So I'm just wondering what is different or similar in the New Meadows roundabout compared to the Taylor's Crossing one and other just plain traffic (no art) roundabouts in Idaho Falls and elsewhere? Personally, I like them.
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  #155  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2006, 2:23 PM
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The Meadows/American Fork



N2I.F.,
Thanks for your kind words. I am a little overly enthusiastic about the Wasatch Front sometimes. I don't imagine that will ever change.
You asked about the Meadows in American Fork. Since I'm an Alpiner and close,I go there regularly for convenience sake. It does sound like it is very similar to the Taylor's Crossing development that you described. I couldn't find any photo's of The Meadows on the Net.,so this will be a great motivator to get out with my new digital and take some pic's.
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  #156  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2006, 2:55 PM
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photo: posted earlier by Leebuddy


Development plan to benefit district

Alpine schools to get tax funds from Pl. Grove project

By Laura Hancock
Deseret Morning News
PLEASANT GROVE — The Alpine School District has entered into a community development agreement with Pleasant Grove, which is giving 50 acres of farmland near the I-15/Pleasant Grove interchange to a developer to build a convention center and at least two high-rise hotels.
The district normally receives $150 in property taxes for the entire 50 acres because taxes on agricultural land are lower than taxes on other properties, said Rob Smith, the school district's business administrator.
Under the new agreement, the district is poised to receive $77,400 a year in taxes — only 15 percent of the normal taxable value but obviously significantly more than $150, which is why the district is participating in the agreement.
"The question is, 'Would they develop it without the agreement?"' Smith said. "And the comment you get from the city is they would not."
Another incentive for the district is that the conference center and hotels, which will be built by resort developer John Q. Hammons, will encourage development in surrounding areas — and the district will receive tax money from those developments.
Furthermore, as the value of the conference center and hotels increases, the amount of tax money the district will receive in time will also increase, Smith said.
The taxes that the district would normally receive will flow to the city's community development agency to help pay for roads, sewer lines, utilities and to repay the city's $35 million bond issuance for the project, Smith said.
The agreement is expected to last for about 25 years or until the bond is paid off, whichever occurs first. Then the taxes will return to regular rates.
The city will also receive a portion of county taxes generated by the convention center property.
According to city officials, groundbreaking for the upscale Embassy Suites Hotel and Convention Center should take place in 2008. The hotel will be upscale, officials say.
"There's a class of traveler that always seeks to stay in the finest (hotels)," said Pleasant Grove economic developer Richard Bradford. "This will be on par with any of the finest hotels in the United States and some of the resort properties in the European market."
The city also expects to have several restaurants locate in the area as a result of the convention center that are not presently in Utah.
Though no contracts have been signed with specific establishments, Bradford said restaurants like The Cheesecake Factory are being considered.


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  #157  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2006, 3:23 PM
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WasatcOne!! Mooooooooore Pic's?

I've been looking forward to more of your pics of Provo. I imagine you are probably extremely busy. As soon as you get a chance, take some more.
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  #158  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2006, 4:38 PM
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According to city officials, groundbreaking for the upscale Embassy Suites Hotel and Convention Center should take place in 2008.



I thought the groundbreaking was in the spring of 2007, now it's in 2008? See already they are pushing it back. Soon it will say groundbreaking in 2009, then 2010 and soon before we know it they will start taking floors off the building.
hmmmmmmmmmmmm....what does this remind me of?.........I wounder if the H.P. tower is still at 21-floors. LOL.
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Old Posted Nov 25, 2006, 1:35 PM
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Highland votes to add commercial retail zone

By Amy Choate-Nielsen
Deseret Morning News


HIGHLAND — Highbrow Highland will soon be home to 17 new acres of commercial development, but the city's decision to add a retail zone to their general plan wasn't an easy one.
Deseret Morning News graphic After listening to multiple public hearings and discussions on the subject, Highland's City Council on Tuesday voted 3-2 to update the city's general plan to add a commercial retail zone at the corner of 11000 North, also known as state Route 92, and Alpine Highway, which is also known as state Route 74.
"The council weighed in and had lots of different viewpoints, and I think that mirrors what the residents feel," said Highland Mayor Jay Franson. "So to have a split vote is not to have a negative thing, in my mind. I think it's a very positive thing."
According to a city-sponsored survey of residents several months ago, about 47 percent of residents were opposed to adding more commercial space to Highland, while about 53 percent were in favor. About 24 percent of Highland's nearly 14,000 residents completed and returned the survey.
Residents were divided in their opinion, and City Council members were also divided at the council meeting on Tuesday night.
Some council members pointed out that the proposed increased retail zone could bring an additional $200,000 to the city, but others said Highland should be a haven from heavy retail areas.
"The reason I came to Highland is the same reason other people have come here — because there's a peacefulness out here that you can't come by easily," said City Councilwoman Kathryn Schramm. "I don't want to give that up."
Schramm and Councilman Brian Brunson voted against the motion, while Councilwoman Claudia Stillman and Councilmen Steve King and Glen Vawdry voted in favor of the zone change.
"We need more sales revenue," Stillman said. "We could raise property taxes again, but it would be nice not to have to do that."
Council members also said they prefer to keep all of the commercial businesses in the city in the same location. The city's existing town center is across the street, which is a major thoroughfare for Alpine and Highland.
The city already has plans for the corner, which is currently an empty field. Thomas Fox Properties has submitted plans to the city for a shopping center that will be called Highland Marketplace. According to Tom Hulbert, managing partner of the development company, the project should be under way early next year, with the first stores open in late fall.
The $30 million project is slated to have 180,000 square feet for commercial businesses. Although no contracts have been signed for specific stores for the development, Hulbert said he expects to have a grocery store, several restaurants and possibly a bank in the shopping center.
The project will be presented to the City Council in two weeks for final site approval.
"I know change is difficult, especially in a small community, but I think the feel and look of the project will be something that will be a benefit to the community," Hulbert said.
Some residents, like Darrel Ockler, who lives next door to the potential project, aren't so sure about the benefit the project will bring. But Ockler is resigned to the inevitable change.
"I disapprove of it simply because we've lived in this house for 27 years and we've enjoyed the openness," Ockler said. "The elected officials felt like they needed to do something with the corner, so they've done it. I'm not in favor of what they've done, but I'm one of several thousand people, so my opinion doesn't matter."


Aerial of Highland, Utah/bottom half of photo

Last edited by delts145; Nov 25, 2006 at 1:46 PM.
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Old Posted Nov 26, 2006, 2:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leebuddy
According to city officials, groundbreaking for the upscale Embassy Suites Hotel and Convention Center should take place in 2008.



I thought the groundbreaking was in the spring of 2007, now it's in 2008? See already they are pushing it back. Soon it will say groundbreaking in 2009, then 2010 and soon before we know it they will start taking floors off the building.
hmmmmmmmmmmmm....what does this remind me of?.........I wounder if the H.P. tower is still at 21-floors. LOL.
Leebuddy, I noticed alot of activity in that area between the interchanges of American Fork and Pleasant Grove. We went to Provo for Thanksgiving dinner and passed quite a bit of new construction currently underway. At least there seems to be alot going on, even right now. I'll take some pics of what I saw in couple of days when I pass by. I need to get into the habit of taking the camera with me in the car.
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