HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #321  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2017, 8:28 PM
dc_denizen's Avatar
dc_denizen dc_denizen is offline
Selfie-stick vendor
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 5,562
The Thames riverfront is such an architectural jumble that it doesn't affront me so much.

The Ferris wheel at place de la Concorde is arguably more jarring.
__________________
Joined the bus on the 33rd seat
By the doo-doo room with the reek replete
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #322  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2017, 11:04 PM
montréaliste montréaliste is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Montréal, évidemment!
Posts: 1,316
Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Today, yes. A century ago, no.
Exactly the point I was trying to make. Many artists and writers of note thought the Tower to be an arrogant piece of Industrialist savoir-faire posing as Art. It took a while for Paris to warm to it but the elegance of it baffled those who sought to defile its majesty.

I don't mind the big wheel myself, I rather like it more than the shard or the gherkin personally, but I am not comparing the strong visual synthesis of the Eiffel Tower with the wheel's rather mundane evocation of "fun" in the here and now.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #323  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 12:03 AM
The North One's Avatar
The North One The North One is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 3,094
Quote:
Originally Posted by pico44 View Post
The Ferris Wheel is so ridiculously terrible. I'm just in awe of the fact that it happened.
I thought Londoners loved the eye?

I mean, lots of cities have them. I've been on the one in Chicago and thought it was a great experience, a really cool thing to have in a city. Although it might not work in every city.
__________________
Spawn of questionable parentage!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #324  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 12:51 AM
LMich's Avatar
LMich LMich is online now
Midwest Moderator - Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Big Mitten
Posts: 31,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_denizen View Post
The Thames riverfront is such an architectural jumble that it doesn't affront me so much.

The Ferris wheel at place de la Concorde is arguably more jarring.
This. There is no architectural coherence to the riverfront to begin with, so it's not like it's disrespecting some particular cohesive aesthetic vision for the riverfront, anyway.

Now, functionally? When I was there everyone was telling me there is basically a line all day just to use it, and it's not really a "ride" (it's basically a rotating observation deck) so be prepared to be on it longer than you may have imagined or wanted. I didn't even bother; we didn't have the time.
__________________
Where the trees are the right height
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #325  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 4:13 AM
King Kill 'em's Avatar
King Kill 'em King Kill 'em is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 1,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I don't think it's THAT bad. London isn't really a uniform historic city like Florence; it has tons of postwar brutalist and modern architecture. I think there's room for modern and/or tacky stuff.
That's why London is far more interesting than Paris. Cities need to evolve
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #326  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 4:39 AM
The North One's Avatar
The North One The North One is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 3,094
Quote:
Originally Posted by King Kill 'em View Post
That's why London is far more interesting than Paris. Cities need to evolve
I don't find London more interesting than Paris at all.

Who says Paris hasn't evolved? Just because it preserves it's beauty doesn't mean it hasn't "evolved" that sounds like bullshit.
__________________
Spawn of questionable parentage!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #327  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 5:51 AM
mhays mhays is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 16,789
Of course Paris has evolved. I returned in May for the first time in a while, and visit London pretty frequently. They're both an interesting mix of old and new. (The best parts of London tend to skew older, not like the "transitional" and outer areas that get the highrises; this is similar between the two.)
__________________
"Alot" isn't a word.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #328  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 2:43 PM
Steely Dan's Avatar
Steely Dan Steely Dan is online now
devout Pizzatarian
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: The Miami of Canada
Posts: 19,406
Quote:
Originally Posted by The North One View Post
I mean, lots of cities have them. I've been on the one in Chicago and thought it was a great experience, a really cool thing to have in a city. Although it might not work in every city.
Keep in mind the scale difference between the London Eye and Chicago's Navy Pier Ferris Wheel.

Chicago's Wheel is only 200' tall, and set against the immediate backdrop of Chicago's mighty skyline, it becomes a visual afterthought on the cityscape. Nearby Lake Point Tower is more than 3x taller than it. Navy Pier has also had a carnival atmosphere for several decades now, so something like a big ferris wheel is a natural fit.

The London Eye, on the other hand, is more than twice as tall as Chicago's wheel at 443' tall and it dominates its immediate area on the Thames. It has a much larger visual impact on its surroundings and thus people tend to have stronger opinions on whether or not that's a good thing.
__________________
He has to go.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #329  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 3:37 PM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 873
I don't mind the London Eye personally, it's no great aesthetic achievement but I've seen more egregious eyesores in cities...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #330  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 4:07 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44,993
It could be a lot worse:


__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #331  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 4:25 PM
10023's Avatar
10023 10023 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 16,802
It may come to that.



__________________
There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #332  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 4:27 PM
10023's Avatar
10023 10023 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 16,802
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_denizen View Post
The Thames riverfront is such an architectural jumble that it doesn't affront me so much.

The Ferris wheel at place de la Concorde is arguably more jarring.
Architectural jumble, sure. But it's a jumble of different buildings, not enormous amusement park rides.
__________________
There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #333  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 5:39 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 16,455
Quote:
Originally Posted by King Kill 'em View Post
That's why London is far more interesting than Paris. Cities need to evolve
I would disagree, but whatever, it's subjective.

The vast majority of cities are an architectural jumble of styles from different eras, like London. Very few (perhaps no?) world cities have a uniform style like Paris.

Paris, to me, is easily the most beautiful first-tier city on earth. Of course, if you find the Haussmann style monotonous, then Paris isn't for you. In any case, many side streets are medieval and the outer neighborhoods are jumbled, like London, but obviously a different style.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #334  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 7:15 PM
ChargerCarl ChargerCarl is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Los Angeles/San Francisco
Posts: 2,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by The North One View Post
I don't find London more interesting than Paris at all.

Who says Paris hasn't evolved? Just because it preserves it's beauty doesn't mean it hasn't "evolved" that sounds like bullshit.
By preserving structures over people Paris has turned its city center into a museum for the pleasure of the wealthy.

So yeah, Paris has evolved, but not in a good way.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #335  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 7:45 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 16,455
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChargerCarl View Post
By preserving structures over people Paris has turned its city center into a museum for the pleasure of the wealthy.

So yeah, Paris has evolved, but not in a good way.
London's core is just as wealth-centric, perhaps even worse. And it has tons of postwar and modern construction.

And it isn't like all of Paris' core is a golden ghetto. There are plenty of streets with blatant prostitution, dumpy stores, concentrations of poor, etc.

Last visit I saw a street brawl in Pigalle, steps from Moulin Rouge. The areas around Gare du Nord and Gare d l'Est are pretty seedy. Then there's that area north of Les Halles with all the African businesses and obvious illegal stuff going on.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #336  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 8:43 PM
King Kill 'em's Avatar
King Kill 'em King Kill 'em is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 1,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I would disagree, but whatever, it's subjective.

The vast majority of cities are an architectural jumble of styles from different eras, like London. Very few (perhaps no?) world cities have a uniform style like Paris.

Paris, to me, is easily the most beautiful first-tier city on earth. Of course, if you find the Haussmann style monotonous, then Paris isn't for you. In any case, many side streets are medieval and the outer neighborhoods are jumbled, like London, but obviously a different style.
Architectural jumble is what makes cities great and interesting to explore. I love the juxtaposition of buildings from different eras all together. I like the outer arrondissements of Paris better, where there's a lot of post war mondernism mixed with the Haussmann. It's not as pretty as the inner ones but what it lacks in beauty, it gains in diversity and I assume affordability. To me affordability is the most important issue in city planning and should almost always come before issues of beauty.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #337  
Old Posted Jun 17, 2017, 12:22 AM
dc_denizen's Avatar
dc_denizen dc_denizen is offline
Selfie-stick vendor
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 5,562
__________________
Joined the bus on the 33rd seat
By the doo-doo room with the reek replete
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #338  
Old Posted Jun 17, 2017, 2:58 AM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Jersey - Somerset County
Posts: 23,385
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChargerCarl View Post
By preserving structures over people Paris has turned its city center into a museum for the pleasure of the wealthy.

So yeah, Paris has evolved, but not in a good way.
There is a fair amount of preservation in cities like London and even NY. In the U.S., ways to incorporate the original facade, and build on top of it. Nice structures can be preserved, just takes a bif of engineering and design modification.

With land prices the way they are, places like London and Paris have no choice to build up. To be competitive to meet the residential and office demand. BUT preservation can still happen. Its not always an end sum game of demolition of the existing structure.

OR, preservationists favorite option. Internal renovation/conversion. Saves the structure, saves the facade and look, and all the new space or functions are on the inside (interior).

There are options, but as the city grows, some beauties spanning the decades will go. Its a byproduct of growth.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #339  
Old Posted Jun 17, 2017, 4:27 AM
King Kill 'em's Avatar
King Kill 'em King Kill 'em is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 1,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris08876 View Post
There is a fair amount of preservation in cities like London and even NY. In the U.S., ways to incorporate the original facade, and build on top of it. Nice structures can be preserved, just takes a bif of engineering and design modification.

With land prices the way they are, places like London and Paris have no choice to build up. To be competitive to meet the residential and office demand. BUT preservation can still happen. Its not always an end sum game of demolition of the existing structure.

OR, preservationists favorite option. Internal renovation/conversion. Saves the structure, saves the facade and look, and all the new space or functions are on the inside (interior).

There are options, but as the city grows, some beauties spanning the decades will go. Its a byproduct of growth.
Except Paris doesn't grow up that much with it's super strict height limits.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #340  
Old Posted Jun 17, 2017, 3:23 PM
sbarn sbarn is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 2,034
Quote:
Originally Posted by King Kill 'em View Post
Except Paris doesn't grow up that much with it's super strict height limits.
Nor should it IMO.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 4:19 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.