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  #721  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2013, 4:26 AM
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^^^Yes, SoBro is part of downtown.

Vandy is in the on the left side of the photo where the bell tower is. If you look closely, just to the left of the bell tower you can see Vandy's logo.
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  #722  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2013, 4:11 PM
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The talks from Eakin Partners concerning their 12th & Demonbreun development lead me to believe that'll likely be our next office tower. It's got excellent access to the interstate being directly by an interchange, <3 minutes to the heart of music row, and<5 minutes to the heart of downtown, not to mention sitting on a hill that has excellent visibility for any signange a company wants to have.

That said though, Palmer, developer of the West End Summit, has stated on record he's got a site for another Midtown office tower in the works so who knows about that end.
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  #723  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2013, 11:26 PM
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Sony records needs to be located in a new tower at the split of West End and Broadway. It would be such a perfect location. It would remind you of Times Square (Sony Plaza?) in a small way. They could cap it off with a digital billboard promoting all their acts and talent.

With the West End Summit's three towers on the North side and the Southern Lands 13+ story building a block to the south, a 25 to 30 story building right in the middle with all the flashy signage would make mid-town an iconic place.

A crude rendering of the location...



Maybe this is what Palmer is planning. One could only hope!
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  #724  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2013, 5:25 PM
PillowTalk4 PillowTalk4 is offline
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MidTenn1, I couldn't agree with you more regarding the need for a major iconic building needing to be built at that location. I remember back when I was kid, there used to be a huge Coca Cola sign located atop what I believe was an auto repair shop or dealer that was located there. It was actually a wonderful sign that set the stage for Midtown, which back then some people referred to as uptown. It would be ideal to have a tall building there with a large video board incorporated into its design well above street level. I'd like to see both sides of Broadway leading up to the Broadway/West End Split be transformed with several highrises that are carry a vibe similar to Time Square but obviously on a smaller scale, mix in street level shops, restaurants, night clubs and entertainment venues and I think it could be accomplished. And, even though I think the White Castles is on property that could be used for something better, I'd be ok with it staying just to add to the quirkiness. Maybe a Krystals can be built across the street... LOL.
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  #725  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2013, 3:28 PM
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Passed another construction site on the way in this morning at 3rd & KWV. The old stuctures on the site for the new Hilton Garden Suites have been razed and site grading is being done.
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  #726  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2013, 1:55 AM
Dr Nevergold Dr Nevergold is offline
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http://www.theatlanticcities.com/hou...ng-again/4991/

According to this article Nashville is in the top 10 metros for growth.

If this is true, then the condo market should heat up.
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  #727  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2013, 2:00 PM
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The Sheds

from the Nashville City Paper

Charlotte Avenue warehouses to be converted to office, retail space

Holladay Properties sees corridor as well suited for adaptive reuse project
Published March 20, 2013 by William Williams

The transformation of the Midtown stretch of Charlotte Avenue will continue, as Holladay Properties announced today it will take some aging industrial warehouse space located in the street’s 2200 block and convert it to office usage.

Holladay and Cassidy Turley principal Ronnie Wenzler — known for having teamed on the local Sawtooth Building and BowTruss Building projects — will call the adaptive reuse development The Sheds on Charlotte. Located at 2200 Charlotte Avenue, the 1940s-built row of corrugated metal sheds will be transformed into a light-filled office and retail complex linked with courtyards and offering free surface parking. Nashville-based Tuck-Hinton Architects will handle design work.

Construction is expected to begin later this year and will include the razing of a former Tennessee Department of Transportation building located on the east end of the property and next to the warehouses. Considered historic and a strong example of modernist architecture, the structure is nonetheless unsound, according to Holladay and its engineers. The second phase of the project will include construction of a new building to replace the TDOT structure.

Holladay is not disclosing a cost for the undertaking.

Allen Arender, Holladay Properties’ Nashville-based vice president of development, said several factors make the project attractive, including “the very dramatic re-urbanization of the Charlotte corridor” as seen by the recently opened 28th/31st Avenues Connector and the One City mixed-use project that is slated to start soon.

“The Sheds are commanding and architecturally significant structures, and our intent is to free the structure instead of cover it up,” Arender said. “This project makes good economic sense. Even after making a significant investment in the renovation, we’ll still be able to lease space at an attractive rate. We expect interest to be very high.”

Spanning 22nd and 23rd avenues, The Sheds on Charlotte will comprise three buildings connected by two courtyards. With 42,750 square feet, the complex will include two two-story buildings containing 17,680 square feet each and a one-story building of 7,400 square feet. A bridge will connect the two-story buildings at the second-floor level.

Holliday Properties foresees a mix of office and retail tenants, including a restaurant.

“At this point, all options are open,” said Wenzler, who will once again partner with Holladay. “The beauty of this facility is that it can be easily configured to meet many different needs, from a mixed-use, multi-tenant environment, to a single-tenant office campus. Our architects have done an outstanding job of opening up these interconnected structures to take maximum advantage of the best opportunities for occupancy. It's a broker’s dream.”

Architect Seab Tuck of Tuck-Hinton Architects said The Sheds on Charlotte is well suited for Nashville’s fast-changing commercial real estate market.

“Today, a lot of companies are looking for interesting space, not the typical box with grey carpet, beige walls and acoustic tile suspended ceiling,” Tuck said. “With its exposed steel beams, brick courtyards and expanses of clear and frosted window, The Sheds on Charlotte fills this bill. It will be the most distinctive new space in town. One of the first projects designed by our firm also incorporated an industrial shed, the Riverfront Apartments, and it was the most internationally published project we ever created. There’s something iconic about these kind of structures that captures the imagination.”

The Sheds on Charlotte development team reinvented what is now known as The Sawtooth Building, which opened in 2011 as the headquarters of Griffin Technology. Named for its distinctive roofline of clerestory windows, The Sawtooth Building was formerly a mattress factory.

Currently, Holladay Properties and Wenzler are renovating the former Crescent Furniture building located at 1001 Third Ave N. in Germantown into office and retail space. Known as The BowTruss Building because of the curved steel trusses that support the vaulted roof over a portion of the building, the 38,000-square-foot building is in its final phase of construction with tenants moving in. The team expects to fill the remaining available space with office and retail tenants by year’s end.

Established in 1952, Indiana-based Holladay Properties has completed projects in 15 states with a total project valuation of more than $2 billion. Its Nashville office opened 1986 and is the company's largest office.






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  #728  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2013, 5:01 PM
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I would have said that's a weird conversion years ago, but it reminds me of Wychwood Barns in Toronto, a re-development that has helped an older neighborhood come back to life. Re-using and re-tooling old industrial/warehouse type buildings in this fashion is becoming increasingly successful.
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  #729  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2013, 12:38 AM
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Confidence waning on SoBro ...

No, no inside info, just a gut-feeling.
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  #730  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2013, 2:25 AM
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Quote:
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Confidence waning on SoBro ...

No, no inside info, just a gut-feeling.
What specifically are you referring to? Are you saying the entire neighborhood is not going to develop?
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  #731  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2013, 2:34 AM
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What specifically are you referring to? Are you saying the entire neighborhood is not going to develop?
No, just Tony G.'s highrise.
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  #732  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2013, 5:40 AM
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^^^I hope not, and I don't think so. Many seem long on it, and I do have insider information
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  #733  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2013, 2:39 PM
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I'd be delighted to find out that my gut-feeling is just acid reflux.
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  #734  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2013, 3:00 PM
PillowTalk4 PillowTalk4 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon716 View Post
I would have said that's a weird conversion years ago, but it reminds me of Wychwood Barns in Toronto, a re-development that has helped an older neighborhood come back to life. Re-using and re-tooling old industrial/warehouse type buildings in this fashion is becoming increasingly successful.
I have a friend that used to rent an apartment in a house on Clifton down the street from where these buildings are located. I remember passing those buildings many times in the 80's when he lived in the area and later after he moved away, I often felt like they could be used for something unique. I actually felt like they would have made a great site for a flea market/miniature farmers market, similar to Eastern Market in Washington, DC.

I wish the TDOT building could be saved. But, if it's in as bad a shape as they say it is then I guess it's best to raze it. It should be interesting to see how the external materials look, especially during the day when the effects of the lighting is not going to be a factor.
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  #735  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2013, 4:56 PM
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Land Swap may destroy Old Ben West Library

The Nashville City Paper reported that in a possible land swap between Metro and the State of TN could result in the demolition of the Old Ben West Library in downtown. The land swap would give the property that the Old Ben West Library sits on to the State and the State would give the property that the old Tennessee Preparatory School sits on to Metro. The State has indicated that it would use the old library site for a surface parking lot.

If this is the case, I truly hope that Metro decides not to go through with this deal. Downtown Nashville does not need another surface parking lot and certainly not on in that location. The building could be used as an art gallery or museum. That would be a wonderful use for that building. If the State wanted to award the building to Tennessee State University as part of master plan to expand the downtown campus, I could even see that. But, it makes no sense to demolish a beautiful building like the old library to replace it with a surface parking lot.

I wish Nashville would ban any new surface lots from being created. They do nothing for the landscape and ultimately they don't help the parking situation long term.
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  #736  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2013, 5:09 PM
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More surface parking is stupid. Nashville was doing a really good job at killing surface parking lots, but this is a setback. At least building a parking garage with ground level retail and let the retail tenants' lease pay for the garage.
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  #737  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2013, 6:07 AM
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Originally Posted by arkitekte View Post
More surface parking is stupid. Nashville was doing a really good job at killing surface parking lots, but this is a setback. At least building a parking garage with ground level retail and let the retail tenants' lease pay for the garage.
That's certainly what I and many others would rather see. I don't trust the state to have such foresight. They are sitting on 20+ acres of surface parking in the Downtown/North Capitol area...they could probably pay off a new parking garage by simply selling a most of that land and consolidating the parking. But I don't think the state thinks like that.

As for Metro's side of things...yes, it sucks knowing that it will become surface parking...but at the same time, the deal makes since because of what they acquire. The parking lot will make no real difference to the vitality of the area since it essentially replaces an abandoned building.

Hopefully the market forces prevail and the state has an incentive to give up some of its wasteful holdings.
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  #738  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2013, 3:48 PM
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There's nothing wrong with parking as long as its done right. This isn't done right, it'd be nice if they created a large underground garage with a useful building on top, and some storefronts on the sidewalk facing portion of the structure.
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  #739  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2013, 8:06 PM
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I'd have to disagree on all fronts with any deal that would replace the old library with any type of parking lot or garage. Nashville has already sold off one too many buidlings that could have been repurposed. I don't believe the building is abandoned right now. It's being used by the Probations Department. Which could be that it is being underutilized. Either way, the building can and should be used for other purposes such as an art gallery or museum. Haven't there been plans for opening either an African American or Gospel Music museum in Nashville among others? Surely the Ben West Bldg would be a great location for either.

I'd rather see someone take the current surface parking lot, build a below ground garage and convert the above ground space into a green space with art features or a fountain. I'm sure the people living in the Bennie Dillon Lofts would like that as well.

nashvol85, I'm with you in that I don't trust the State to have any foresight. They've already made plans to demolish the Cordell Hull building and who knows what they plan to do with it... Probably a parking lot. And, the State is sitting on valuable riverfront property that could be used for something a lot more attractive than gravel parking lots. That property should have longed been developed into a wonderful East Bank commercial and residential development district. But, developers and city leaders still don't have a a real vision for that area either. So, no wonder ripping out an old library means nothing.... It's just another good ole swap meet....
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  #740  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2013, 8:21 PM
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^I agree, the state could develop all of the properties, existing and surface parking to not only benefit their wallets, but also the community.

However, all of the entertainment money is slowly drifting south furthermore toward SoBro and the Gulch. If the state wants a ghost town around the capital they're for sure going to get their wish.
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