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  #201  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2010, 8:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Vancity View Post
Could you explain why you'd be worried the viability of the ownership group and the canucks?
two words: Arthur Griffiths.
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  #202  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2010, 10:59 PM
mrjauk mrjauk is offline
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Originally Posted by mezzanine View Post
two words: Arthur Griffiths.
Your logic prompts me to quote a line from "All About Eve":

"You have a point. An idiotic one, but a point."

Okay, maybe your point is not idiotic, but it is certainly of dubious logical merit.

I assume that you're suggesting that because Aquilini, like Griffiths, is a local owner, that were he to own all three entities--the arena, the Canucks, and an NBA franchise, that he too would face financial difficulties?

The problem with your logic is everything else about the two men--especially their financial situations--and the general economic situation--particularly the value of the Canadian versus the US dollar--is not the same.

When he started to build the new arena, Griffiths had absolutely no intention of owning a NBA franchise. This was spearheaded by David Stern, amongst others, who wanted a bookend for the new Toronto NBA franchise. The fact is that Griffiths pockets were never deep enough to finance the whole undertaking. Moreover, the Canucks and the Grizzlies were bleeding money because their payrolls had to me met with US funds, while most of their revenue was generated in Canadian funds, and at the time the CDN "peso" was worth anywhere between 65-75 cents.
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  #203  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2010, 12:02 AM
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Originally Posted by mrjauk View Post
Your logic prompts me to quote a line from "All About Eve":

"You have a point. An idiotic one, but a point."

Okay, maybe your point is not idiotic, but it is certainly of dubious logical merit.

I assume that you're suggesting that because Aquilini, like Griffiths, is a local owner, that were he to own all three entities--the arena, the Canucks, and an NBA franchise, that he too would face financial difficulties?

The problem with your logic is everything else about the two men--especially their financial situations--and the general economic situation--particularly the value of the Canadian versus the US dollar--is not the same.

When he started to build the new arena, Griffiths had absolutely no intention of owning a NBA franchise. This was spearheaded by David Stern, amongst others, who wanted a bookend for the new Toronto NBA franchise. The fact is that Griffiths pockets were never deep enough to finance the whole undertaking. Moreover, the Canucks and the Grizzlies were bleeding money because their payrolls had to me met with US funds, while most of their revenue was generated in Canadian funds, and at the time the CDN "peso" was worth anywhere between 65-75 cents.
yeah. definitely agree that when Griffiths built the new arena, and had the grizzlies, as well as the canucks - he did not have of deep pockets financially to sustain the two franchises, AND the arena. today's dollar is a little bit higher than when Griffiths owned the Canucks and the Grizz. I think Aquilini would be able to sustain both franchises, considering how well the Canucks are doing now (can't see their sell-out streak ending any time soon, and they are wildly popular. Right now, it's the place to be, for sporting entertainment). For the NBA to thrive here. It's building a winner. If the new franchise, and management can do that, then yeah, things will be good. I think having a superstar like Chris Paul, would be a good thing for the city. I don't know if the NBA will ever return to Vancouver, but I know that this city is able to sustain a franchise, and have a franchise become a winner and thrive here.

The only person I can see bringing back an NBA franchise are the Aquilini's. Local ownership, and deep financial pockets. Nobody else is going to bring an NBA franchise back to this town.
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  #204  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2010, 4:49 PM
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Originally Posted by mrjauk View Post
Your logic prompts me to quote a line from "All About Eve":

"You have a point. An idiotic one, but a point."

Okay, maybe your point is not idiotic, but it is certainly of dubious logical merit.

I assume that you're suggesting that because Aquilini, like Griffiths, is a local owner, that were he to own all three entities--the arena, the Canucks, and an NBA franchise, that he too would face financial difficulties?

The problem with your logic is everything else about the two men--especially their financial situations--and the general economic situation--particularly the value of the Canadian versus the US dollar--is not the same.

When he started to build the new arena, Griffiths had absolutely no intention of owning a NBA franchise. This was spearheaded by David Stern, amongst others, who wanted a bookend for the new Toronto NBA franchise. The fact is that Griffiths pockets were never deep enough to finance the whole undertaking. Moreover, the Canucks and the Grizzlies were bleeding money because their payrolls had to me met with US funds, while most of their revenue was generated in Canadian funds, and at the time the CDN "peso" was worth anywhere between 65-75 cents.
IMO my point of 'dubious logical merit' still stands.

I certainly don't know the finances of the aquellinis, nor I can predict the future. Are they really rich enough to sustain 2 teams? More importantly, can they sustain both teams when/if the grizz and the canucks have several 'rebuilding' ie, crappy seasons? are they diversified enough to sustain them if say, real estate tanks? and will we ever see a ~70 cent dollar again? ever?

Certainly, I can attest to the carpetbagger quality of the american players and the league ("the grizz/sonics will not be moved") and the massive amounts of ill-will generated in vancouver from the whole debacle (like from...me!)

The NBA may become successful again here, but it will take a whole lot IMO.
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  #205  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2010, 5:56 PM
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If there is a strong enough business case to have a team here then perhaps Aquilini will be able to do it given other franchises’ current struggles. Financially, the Aquilini Group is very well capitalized and the ownership would be financially secure.

Having said that, I haven’t heard anything to suggest that Aquilini is particularly passionate about acquiring a basketball franchise. In fact, most of the rumours seem to be based simply on the fact that they own Rogers Arena.

On top of that, as Jlousa pointed out, even if you can make the business case, you’d have to factor in what will likely be pretty hefty conditions imposed by the league.

As long as the NBA is struggling in several markets, I’m guessing the rumours (and this thread) will still be around…I just don’t see the NBA coming back though.
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  #206  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2010, 10:13 PM
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Originally Posted by mrjauk View Post
When he started to build the new arena, Griffiths had absolutely no intention of owning a NBA franchise. This was spearheaded by David Stern, amongst others, who wanted a bookend for the new Toronto NBA franchise. The fact is that Griffiths pockets were never deep enough to finance the whole undertaking. Moreover, the Canucks and the Grizzlies were bleeding money because their payrolls had to me met with US funds, while most of their revenue was generated in Canadian funds, and at the time the CDN "peso" was worth anywhere between 65-75 cents.
That's not true. It was Griffiths who approached the NBA for an expansion team not the other way around. He took advantage of the situation when it became clear the league was about to grant an expansion franchise to Toronto and sold the idea of adding a sister Canadian franchise at the same time. The move backfired when addition to Grizzlies losses, the Canucks themselves were losing tens of millions of dollars not to mention the high cost of construction of GM Place. Only the extreme deep pockets of John McCaw saved Vancouver from losing both the Grizzlies and Canucks.
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  #207  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2011, 11:40 PM
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In a wide-ranging ESPN podcast discussion Monday, NBA commissioner David Stern said that he will not try to stop players from playing overseas next season in the event of a lockout and acknowledged that there is "no shortage of suitors" interested in buying the New Orleans Hornets and moving them to another city.

Stern also revealed, in his annual visit with ESPN's Bill Simmons, that some owners in the league would not be opposed to contracting the Hornets in upcoming labor negotiations, but insisted that the league's goal since assuming operating control of the Hornets in December has been to "make it unattractive to move [the franchise] or contract it."

Near the end of the 55-minute podcast, Stern likewise revealed that he favors increasing the NBA's current drug-testing requirements -- four random tests per season -- to ensure that the use of performance-enhancing drugs does not seep into the game.

Some of the main topics Stern addressed during the interview include:

Whether the NBA will try to prevent locked-out players such as Kobe Bryant and Dirk Nowitzki, while still under contract to their NBA teams, from playing abroad during a potential work stoppage

"If, in fact, there's a lockout, then the player is free during the course of the lockout to do what he wants to do if his contract is in effect. I don't want to play that game with anybody. ... If we have a collective bargaining arrangement with the union and there's a lockout, then last time around [in 1998] players were free to do what they're going to do, because they've been locked out."

Why the NBA felt the need to buy the Hornets from longtime owner George Shinn

"We just followed the crowd. Baseball took over the Montreal Expos, the NHL took over the Coyotes, and we stepped in to make sure that the Hornets would be well operated and be made stronger. ... There was no more money that a principal owner was going to put into the team, and the negotiations [for Shinn to sell the team] had dragged on for so long that we thought it was the time to show a little love for New Orleans. So we stepped in, we continued the strong day-to-day management, we added some strengthening features, we talked with the governor and the mayor, both of whom have been tremendously cooperative together with the business community, as well.

"We're out there looking for the new season-ticket campaign which has just been launched, and we're hopeful that when we put this together there will emerge a buyer who wants to own the team in New Orleans. There [is] no shortage of suitors who have contacted us who want to buy the team and take it someplace else. ... [But] that would not be our first choice at all. That's not why we stepped in and bought the team."

Charges that the league has exposed itself to a serious conflict of interest by taking over operating control of one of its franchises for the first time in NBA history

"... You'd be surprised at how uninvolved we are [in New Orleans]. The only place we get involved is advice on ticket sales, groups, renewals, suggestions when they ask us if we have additional personnel they can hire. They set the budget, we approve it, and we've approved anything that they previously wanted to do on the player side. It's kind of interesting.

"... The uncertainty about the marketplace was really badly affecting the value of the franchise, and we thought that the franchise was being demonstrably undervalued, so we stepped in, and we'll see. Maybe we're wrong, but I think we're right, and we're comfortable with the decision. The [NBA's other] owners endorsed [buying the Hornets] in a very robust fashion."

Conspiracy theories suggesting that one of the league's motivations in buying the Hornets was to give itself the ability to easily contract one team for leverage in upcoming labor negotiations

"Well, I guess all I would say to that is that wouldn't be a conspiracy. I know that there are some owners who might share that view. ... Anything that we do gets done by a majority of the owners. All you're stating is a potential third option. But right now we are steaming full speed ahead with every single possible [intent] to make that team successful in New Orleans, and I think we're going to succeed. So we're going to make it unattractive to move it or contract it."

Cities that have expressed interest in taking on an existing NBA team in a franchise relocation

"I think maybe or maybe not on my watch, when Seattle has plans for a new building, I think it's a very prime city for an NBA franchise. We've been visited or contacted by three different groups that are putting up a building in Las Vegas. & We've had visits from Anaheim, we've had visits from, believe it or not, Vancouver."


Cities that have NBA-ready buildings

"Well, for sure Kansas City. ... There's a brand new building in Pittsburgh, there's a good building in St. Louis, there's a good building in Tampa/St. Pete. ... I know [Anaheim's Honda Center has] got some years on it but I'm told it's a serviceable building.

"So there are lots of potential cities, but our goal here is to keep all of our teams where they are ... but recognizing that that hasn't been a goal that we have successfully achieved in the past."

Stern's own year-to-year contract

"It ends every year. ... And has been [that way] for more time than you can imagine. ... Every year it just keeps going until either one of [us] decides that I don't ... that I won't come back."

Whether the NBA has a bigger problem with performance-enhancing drugs, after the 10-game suspensions of O.J. Mayo this season and Rashard Lewis last season, than it realizes or admits

"I think that we could add a test or two just to be on the safe side beyond what we have, but that's for a negotiation with the players. Other than that, I think what we're doing is great. I think that we demonstrate to our fans, when things are quiet, suddenly you'll hear we suspended someone because they did something they shouldn't have done, and that lets everyone know we're there and we're testing and we're acting upon the tests no matter what it is that tests that way. And I think that's helpful for our fans and for our players."

The NBA's long-held claim that steroids generally can't help basketball players like they've helped baseball players

"You know, it would be easy for me to say that, and I hope it's true. But I'm not sure anymore. ... I don't know. I mean, I believe that. I don't believe they help speed or kinds of things that our players do. ... I'm pretty sure that we don't have a problem. I go to sleep at night not worrying about that because I think we've got it completely covered. But you know, you always worry."

How optimistic Stern is about avoiding a lockout before the current labor agreement expires June 30:

"... It's not that I'm either optimistic or pessimistic. What I am is determined to knock as many heads together, including my own, and work as hard as possible between now and probably June 30 to see whether we can't make a deal. That's what it is."

How damaging an extended work stoppage would be to the league's long-term health at a time that fan interest in the game, judging by the recent upward trends in ticket sales and TV ratings, is seemingly booming

"You've got it. But that said, the [business] numbers are not lying. And we need a better revenue-sharing system. And if you're just going to share losses, it's not a good thing. You need some revenue. We need a system where all of our teams have the opportunity to compete and to make a few dollars. That's not a bad desire for collective bargaining for a sports league, and it's great for our fans."

Gotta believe that the Aquilini's are inquiring about the team. Wouldn't that be cool to have Chris Paul here? AWESOME.
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  #208  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2011, 11:42 PM
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In a wide-ranging ESPN podcast discussion Monday, NBA commissioner David Stern said that he will not try to stop players from playing overseas next season in the event of a lockout and acknowledged that there is "no shortage of suitors" interested in buying the New Orleans Hornets and moving them to another city.

Stern also revealed, in his annual visit with ESPN's Bill Simmons, that some owners in the league would not be opposed to contracting the Hornets in upcoming labor negotiations, but insisted that the league's goal since assuming operating control of the Hornets in December has been to "make it unattractive to move [the franchise] or contract it."

Near the end of the 55-minute podcast, Stern likewise revealed that he favors increasing the NBA's current drug-testing requirements -- four random tests per season -- to ensure that the use of performance-enhancing drugs does not seep into the game.

Some of the main topics Stern addressed during the interview include:

Whether the NBA will try to prevent locked-out players such as Kobe Bryant and Dirk Nowitzki, while still under contract to their NBA teams, from playing abroad during a potential work stoppage

"If, in fact, there's a lockout, then the player is free during the course of the lockout to do what he wants to do if his contract is in effect. I don't want to play that game with anybody. ... If we have a collective bargaining arrangement with the union and there's a lockout, then last time around [in 1998] players were free to do what they're going to do, because they've been locked out."

Why the NBA felt the need to buy the Hornets from longtime owner George Shinn

"We just followed the crowd. Baseball took over the Montreal Expos, the NHL took over the Coyotes, and we stepped in to make sure that the Hornets would be well operated and be made stronger. ... There was no more money that a principal owner was going to put into the team, and the negotiations [for Shinn to sell the team] had dragged on for so long that we thought it was the time to show a little love for New Orleans. So we stepped in, we continued the strong day-to-day management, we added some strengthening features, we talked with the governor and the mayor, both of whom have been tremendously cooperative together with the business community, as well.

"We're out there looking for the new season-ticket campaign which has just been launched, and we're hopeful that when we put this together there will emerge a buyer who wants to own the team in New Orleans. There [is] no shortage of suitors who have contacted us who want to buy the team and take it someplace else. ... [But] that would not be our first choice at all. That's not why we stepped in and bought the team."

Charges that the league has exposed itself to a serious conflict of interest by taking over operating control of one of its franchises for the first time in NBA history

"... You'd be surprised at how uninvolved we are [in New Orleans]. The only place we get involved is advice on ticket sales, groups, renewals, suggestions when they ask us if we have additional personnel they can hire. They set the budget, we approve it, and we've approved anything that they previously wanted to do on the player side. It's kind of interesting.

"... The uncertainty about the marketplace was really badly affecting the value of the franchise, and we thought that the franchise was being demonstrably undervalued, so we stepped in, and we'll see. Maybe we're wrong, but I think we're right, and we're comfortable with the decision. The [NBA's other] owners endorsed [buying the Hornets] in a very robust fashion."

Conspiracy theories suggesting that one of the league's motivations in buying the Hornets was to give itself the ability to easily contract one team for leverage in upcoming labor negotiations

"Well, I guess all I would say to that is that wouldn't be a conspiracy. I know that there are some owners who might share that view. ... Anything that we do gets done by a majority of the owners. All you're stating is a potential third option. But right now we are steaming full speed ahead with every single possible [intent] to make that team successful in New Orleans, and I think we're going to succeed. So we're going to make it unattractive to move it or contract it."

Cities that have expressed interest in taking on an existing NBA team in a franchise relocation

"I think maybe or maybe not on my watch, when Seattle has plans for a new building, I think it's a very prime city for an NBA franchise. We've been visited or contacted by three different groups that are putting up a building in Las Vegas. & We've had visits from Anaheim, we've had visits from, believe it or not, Vancouver."


Cities that have NBA-ready buildings

"Well, for sure Kansas City. ... There's a brand new building in Pittsburgh, there's a good building in St. Louis, there's a good building in Tampa/St. Pete. ... I know [Anaheim's Honda Center has] got some years on it but I'm told it's a serviceable building.

"So there are lots of potential cities, but our goal here is to keep all of our teams where they are ... but recognizing that that hasn't been a goal that we have successfully achieved in the past."

Stern's own year-to-year contract

"It ends every year. ... And has been [that way] for more time than you can imagine. ... Every year it just keeps going until either one of [us] decides that I don't ... that I won't come back."

Whether the NBA has a bigger problem with performance-enhancing drugs, after the 10-game suspensions of O.J. Mayo this season and Rashard Lewis last season, than it realizes or admits

"I think that we could add a test or two just to be on the safe side beyond what we have, but that's for a negotiation with the players. Other than that, I think what we're doing is great. I think that we demonstrate to our fans, when things are quiet, suddenly you'll hear we suspended someone because they did something they shouldn't have done, and that lets everyone know we're there and we're testing and we're acting upon the tests no matter what it is that tests that way. And I think that's helpful for our fans and for our players."

The NBA's long-held claim that steroids generally can't help basketball players like they've helped baseball players

"You know, it would be easy for me to say that, and I hope it's true. But I'm not sure anymore. ... I don't know. I mean, I believe that. I don't believe they help speed or kinds of things that our players do. ... I'm pretty sure that we don't have a problem. I go to sleep at night not worrying about that because I think we've got it completely covered. But you know, you always worry."

How optimistic Stern is about avoiding a lockout before the current labor agreement expires June 30:

"... It's not that I'm either optimistic or pessimistic. What I am is determined to knock as many heads together, including my own, and work as hard as possible between now and probably June 30 to see whether we can't make a deal. That's what it is."

How damaging an extended work stoppage would be to the league's long-term health at a time that fan interest in the game, judging by the recent upward trends in ticket sales and TV ratings, is seemingly booming

"You've got it. But that said, the [business] numbers are not lying. And we need a better revenue-sharing system. And if you're just going to share losses, it's not a good thing. You need some revenue. We need a system where all of our teams have the opportunity to compete and to make a few dollars. That's not a bad desire for collective bargaining for a sports league, and it's great for our fans."

Gotta believe that the Aquilini's are inquiring about the team. Wouldn't that be cool to have Chris Paul here? AWESOME.
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  #209  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2011, 11:43 PM
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oh. sorry for the double post, guys :S
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  #210  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2011, 4:18 PM
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Canucks owner sets sights on moving Hornets to Vancouver
MATTHEW SEKERES
VANCOUVER— From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011 9:17PM EST
Last updated Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2011 9:08AM EST


For more than five years, Canucks Sports and Entertainment chairman Francesco Aquilini has eyed the NBA, looking for a portable franchise that could be bought for a bargain and moved to Vancouver.

Those sights are now set on the New Orleans Hornets.

Sources say Aquilini, whose family owns the NHL’s Canucks but was never involved with basketball’s Vancouver Grizzlies, is inspecting the Hornets, who are being sold by the NBA and could be relocated in the next few years. During an interview this week, commissioner David Stern said Vancouver is one of several markets interested in a relocated NBA franchise, and went out of his way to praise the strong business performance of the Canucks.

Aquilini did not respond to requests for comment Tuesday. One source familiar with his NBA flirtations said Aquilini would require partners to finance a purchase, but that the NBA is impressed with the family’s stewardship of the Canucks.

“We’ve had visits from, believe it or not, Vancouver, where the Canucks are absolutely doing a spectacular job,” Stern told ESPN.

The NBA bought the Hornets last year for $310-million (all currency U.S.), but Forbes values the franchise at $280-million, or 26th among 30 clubs.

The NBA could be headed into a labour interruption after this season, but facing a similar situation in the NHL five years ago, Aquilini was undaunted. He first took a 50-per-cent gamble on the Canucks during the NHL lockout of 2004-05, before completing a full purchase from owner John McCaw in 2007.

Today, the franchise boasts a sellout streak of 337 home games and has gained $50-million in value, according to Forbes.

Stern referred to Seattle, which lost the Sonics to Oklahoma City in 2008, as a “prime” market to get the NBA back once a new arena is built, but wondered whether that would happen in his tenure. He also said that three groups from Las Vegas and representatives from Anaheim have met with him regarding relocated franchises.

He listed Kansas City, Pittsburgh, Anaheim and Tampa/St. Petersburg as markets with NBA-ready facilities. Vancouver’s Rogers Arena, owned by the Canucks, would qualify as well.

“I have regrets about both Seattle and Vancouver,” Stern said.

The NBA purchased the Hornets when it became clear that owner George Shinn was no longer going to finance the club and when a proposed sale to a minority partner stalled. The club’s lease with the New Orleans Arena expires in 2014, but an escape clause could trigger in January, 2013 if attendance benchmarks are not met.

Stern re-iterated that his top priority is to find a buyer who would keep the team in New Orleans, but conceded that some NBA owners would prefer the club be contracted, and that other cities are circling.

“There [is] no shortage of suitors who have contacted us who want to buy the team and take it someplace else,” he said. “That would not be our first choice at all. That’s not why we stepped in and bought the team.”

The NBA’s Grizzlies left Vancouver for Memphis in 2001 after just six seasons, a brief existence that Stern has called his largest regret in 27 years as commissioner.

Aquilini’s interest in an NBA team dates to 2005, when the Hornets were temporarily displaced by Hurricane Katrina and eventually landed in Oklahoma City for two seasons. Within weeks of the disaster, discussions took place between the sides as Vancouver owned one of the few “plug-and-play” arenas at the time.

Shortly thereafter, when the Portland Trail Blazers were believed to be in play, the Canucks owner again looked at the possibility of returning the NBA to Vancouver. And in the spring of 2009, Aquilini was reportedly interested in purchasing and moving the Indiana Pacers, who were negotiating a new lease deal for Conseco Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sport...rticle1908929/
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  #211  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2011, 1:34 AM
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If Aquilini succeeds in bringing a franchise back to Vancouver, AND having it succeed (on and off the court). WOW.

things seem to be looking good for Vancouver to get a franchise again. But I suppose it's too early to say for sure.
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  #212  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2011, 7:24 AM
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I think it's highly unlikely that the NBA will return. For one most fans in Vancouver are only interested in seeing a winning team; remember Brian Burke even talked about the possibility of moving the Canucks back in the 90's. What has changed since the Grizzles left that would now make an NBA team successful? A new NBA team would probably be more successful than the Grizzlies, but I find it hard to imagine Vancouver as the best market for a team.
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  #213  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2011, 7:46 AM
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If the Grizzlies were the guys biggest mistake in 27 years, I think we'd better hope for his retirement before an NBA Franchise
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  #214  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2011, 8:07 AM
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Originally Posted by crazyjoeda View Post
What has changed since the Grizzles left that would now make an NBA team successful?
I think this is self-evident. The city is larger, richer, more famous, better demographics, has much better long-term economic conditions, a much stronger ownership group, much better sports media, and has generated its own NBA superstar since then. Speaking as a 6-year Grizzlies ticketholder, the odds of success are far greater today.
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  #215  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2011, 8:48 AM
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I would have to argue that Vancouver is not significantly larger than it was 10 years ago when the Grizzlies left, certainly no explosive population growth and the demographics are about the same. I'll give you the ownership group and media are better today, but I still don't think this is best city for an NBA team.
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  #216  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2011, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by crazyjoeda View Post
I would have to argue that Vancouver is not significantly larger than it was 10 years ago when the Grizzlies left, certainly no explosive population growth and the demographics are about the same. I'll give you the ownership group and media are better today, but I still don't think this is best city for an NBA team.
I think the city can support an NBA team, no doubt. And yeah, any team coming in would have to begin to win almost immediately. but let's be honest. the standard isn't high. I mean, when the Grizz were here, they had a ton of losing streaks. all we're asking for this time around is to have a competitive team, capable of winning more than 23 games a year. Having the Hornets, and having Chris Paul, who is a known superstar in the league, would be a good start. he seems to have a good head on his shoulders as well.

Ownership, is everything. And it seems like the Aquilini's are solid owners, with a solid business plan (for the Canucks, that much is obvious). Aquilini seems to be hot on wanting an NBA team and moving them to Vancouver. That's great news. Hopefully, there will be progress made and more discussions with Stern on this front. I really cannot see Pittsburgh, or places like Kansas City, or Anaheim, let alone Vegas having NBA teams. There's not even any rumors about owners in those cities willing to make a bid for the Hornets. The NBA was there before, so it's not like Vancouver is an unknown. They need some things to overcome, such as players not wanting to come - but let's be honest. there are other routes in which to achieve success. Not all American ball players hate Vancouver, and certainly, there will be a few who will come and play. Draft those players, pick them, trade for them. Surround them with solid Canadian, Asian, European players. Having a top chinese player wouldn't be bad, considering much of Vancouver's population is chinese, and chinese people LOVE basketball!

Too many people in this city, seem to believe we're not good for anything. Not good fit for the NBA, not a good fit for the MLB, not a good fit for blah blah blah. Some of these leagues are for the best players on the planet, and to be a part of their association (such as the NBA), is a privilege. Yeah, there's a lot of "gangsta's" - but let's not generalize all of the players that way. There are some good, quality, stand up players in the league, and some of them (surprise!) actually love our city.

We had a tough first go, but that doesn't mean that the second time around won't be a success. For one, we're not getting an expansion team. We're getting a RELOCATED team. a team with a foundation already, and a structure. Think of the Atlanta Flames, when they moved to Calgary, and how that organization has flourished in Cowtown. Second, the economy is far better than it was back in 1995 when the Grizz entered the league. The difference between then and now? a 65 cent dollar. What terrible times. The Canucks were also on the verge of moving to another city! And what would happen if they did? Would this city continue to reject the NHL?

The NBA could, and will work, given good management, and a willing owner willing to spend. As for the Canucks? They are forever going to be KING in this town, no matter how well the Whitecaps FC and (or IF) the NBA is doing here.
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  #217  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2011, 6:28 PM
Zassk Zassk is offline
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Originally Posted by crazyjoeda View Post
I would have to argue that Vancouver is not significantly larger than it was 10 years ago when the Grizzlies left, certainly no explosive population growth and the demographics are about the same.
I would argue that there has been a steady growth of population, income, and proportion of residents with Asian origin since the NBA first came.

Metro Vancouver Population
1996 - 1,831,665
2010 - 2,374,628 (+30%)

Immigrants from Asia to Metro Vancouver
1999-2008: 314,217

Metro Vancouver average income per tax filer
1996 - $29,002
2007 - $42,672 (+47%)

source
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  #218  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2011, 6:43 PM
cornholio cornholio is offline
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Originally Posted by Zassk View Post
I would argue that there has been a steady growth of population, income, and proportion of residents with Asian origin since the NBA first came.

Metro Vancouver Population
1996 - 1,831,665
2010 - 2,374,628 (+30%)

Immigrants from Asia to Metro Vancouver
1999-2008: 314,217

Metro Vancouver average income per tax filer
1996 - $29,002
2007 - $42,672 (+47%)

source
But it should still be remembered that NA as a whole has grown in population and the economy has expanded, including most other potential and current NBA franchises cities. The NBA today is not the NBA back then.

Having said that I dont see why Vancouver wouldn't be able to have a NBA franchise. All I would hope for though is for the city not to get one for atleast a few more years because of the MLS White Caps. It would be nice for the Whitecaps to be able to build up a stronger following first instead of the NBA and MLS competing at the same time for market share and both suffering. I would give it atleast a minimum of 2 years, 5 years would be even better. There is no rush, I would rather have both the MLS and NBA in 10 years instead of one of them having to move in 5 because they could not take enough of a market share while competing with another new major league franchise in the city.
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Old Posted Feb 17, 2011, 6:44 PM
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  #220  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2011, 7:08 PM
DKaz DKaz is online now
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We may have a 50% bigger market though, but NBA salaries are double what they were ten years ago. Aquilini could try to work his magic, I'm just not convinced that we won't go back down the same path. Heck Seattle couldn't afford a team, I know that they left because Seattle wouldn't build them an arena but why should any city be expected to build anyone's arena?
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