HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #121  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2007, 3:33 AM
Arch City's Avatar
Arch City Arch City is offline
Proud Homer!
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 4,099
I actually like the first rendering of Union Club, but both are nice. Here's the website of Union Club. It's a big building.

**Union Club**
__________________
Debating some people on the Internet is like debating dead people - it makes you look crazy so why bother? #BYE
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #122  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2007, 3:41 AM
Arch City's Avatar
Arch City Arch City is offline
Proud Homer!
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 4,099
Construction to begin on downtown condo tower
By Riddhi Trivedi-St. Clair
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
06/01/2007


The Cityside Residences of Park Pacific will will offer 42 one-, two- and three-bedroom condominium homes, ranging in price from $283,900-$876,900. This architect's rendering shows an interior view.
(The Lawrence Group)


Alberici Living, a subsidiary of Overland-based Alberici Constructors will be the construction manager for Cityside Residences of Park Pacific. The $150 million project by St. Louis-based The Lawrence Group includes a historic rehab and a new construction condominium building as well as retail and commercial spaces.

Construction on the building at Tucker Boulevard and Olive Street is expected to begin in mid-summer and could signal the beginning of a new wave of residential development in downtown St. Louis.

Cityside Residences is one of three of three construction projects planned for downtown which has so far seen mostly historic rehab projects. The other two projects are Skyhouse at 14th Street and Washington Avenue and a 25-story condo tower adjacent to the Roberts Mayfair Hotel on Ninth Street by the Roberts Brothers Properties.

Cityside will offer 42 one-, two- and three-bedroom condominium homes, ranging in price from $283,900-$876,900.

Cityside will be linked to Parkside – the rehab portion of the development – by an amenity deck with a pool and fitness center, atop a nine-level parking structure for 730 cars. The residential floors will be on nine through 14 above the parking structure and feature seven units per floor. Cityside will also provide retail services on the first floor of the building.

Parkside, in the former Union Pacific Railroad building offers 98 condos priced from $261,900 to $1.65 million. About 30 rental apartments will also be available. Parkside has commercial space from the second to sixth floors and retail on the first floor. Construction and renovation in Parkside also begins mid-summer.

Source
The Cityside Residences of Park Pacific
__________________
Debating some people on the Internet is like debating dead people - it makes you look crazy so why bother? #BYE

Last edited by Arch City; May 4, 2009 at 6:39 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #123  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2007, 5:08 AM
Arch City's Avatar
Arch City Arch City is offline
Proud Homer!
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 4,099
^A rendering of the project in the previous article.

The Cityside Residences of Park Pacific

__________________
Debating some people on the Internet is like debating dead people - it makes you look crazy so why bother? #BYE
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #124  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2007, 3:17 PM
samoen313's Avatar
samoen313 samoen313 is offline
millard fillmore
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: ys
Posts: 199
it's a shame the cityside part wasn't larger. i know there will be a bounty of condos from the old upac building but the new one seems so completely dominated by the parking garage (which, by the way, looks fairly good from renderings, not that i'm condoning the fact that they didn't bother to put any levels below grade). an even bigger factor that confuses me is, if they want to have cityside residences with a view, every resident will have to get on their toes to see over the shameful 8com slab right across the street and whatever the slab a block south is. too bad.
__________________
the sky is falling.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #125  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2007, 3:23 AM
Hotel Guy Hotel Guy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1
Saw the picture of the Four Seasons Hotel

Sorry I'm a pledge...what is "cladding"?

Posted by djvandrake...

Thanks,
Hotel Guy
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #126  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2007, 12:07 PM
djvandrake's Avatar
djvandrake djvandrake is offline
I'm going slightly mad.
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California
Posts: 788
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hotel Guy View Post
Sorry I'm a pledge...what is "cladding"?

Posted by djvandrake...

Thanks,
Hotel Guy

That's a general term for the exterior skin of a building. It can be in the form of metal, glass or a combination of materials.
__________________
My Chicago Pics, July 2009
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #127  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2007, 5:32 PM
djvandrake's Avatar
djvandrake djvandrake is offline
I'm going slightly mad.
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California
Posts: 788
Those godforsaken bastard(s) are torching our new construction again!

Quote:
Blaze parallels string of unsolved arsons
By Patrick M. O'Connell
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
Thursday, Jun. 14 2007

ST. LOUIS — It was another pre-dawn alarm for another raging blaze in another
unfinished high-dollar urban renewal project.

But was Wednesday morning's fire at the mid-city apartment-retail complex,
called "3949 Lindell," a fourth in a series of arsons that had stopped almost
exactly one year before?

Investigators don't know yet as they use trained dogs and other tools to look
for evidence of a deliberate fire.

A homeless couple told a reporter and investigators that they saw two men lob
firebombs at the framework along Lindell Boulevard near Vandeventer Avenue.

"I was close enough that my shirt could have caught on fire," said one of them,
Crystal B. Hall. "I smelled the smoke and felt the heat first."

She and her fiancé, John P. Johnson III, said they had been considering
sleeping in the unfinished structure for the night.

Fire department Capt. Steve Simpson said all information provided to
investigators was taken seriously, but he cautioned that there had been some
inconsistencies in eyewitness accounts.

Joy Branch-Enderlin, special agent in charge of the federal Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives office here, said, "It's very concerning that
we've had multiple fires involving … homes that are under construction."

The agency probes suspected arsons, in this case working beside the police bomb
and arson squad and fire department.

She and Simpson said it is too early to determine for sure what ignited the
three-alarm blaze.

The mixed-use project is being built by Hepfner Smith Airhart & Day Inc., of
Plano, Texas. John Airhart, among company officials who flew to the scene, said
they plan to rebuild.

The $30 million project, four stories tall with 197 apartments and 15,000
square feet of retail space, was reported to have been about 30 percent
complete.

Arson was blamed in the three similar fires last year, but the crimes were
never solved and a $65,000 reward was never claimed.

It was one year ago this morning that fires set in two condominium projects in
Lafayette Square — Mississippi Place and Vail Place — were reported just 37
minutes apart. Damage together was estimated at more than $4 million.

A $3 million loss in a fire April 27, 2006, at the Compton Gate condo project,
2201 Grand Boulevard, also was ruled an arson.

Connections between the blazes were presumed, but no motive was established.

Nobody was seriously injured in any of the fires, although Simpson said a
firefighter sustained a minor cut from an ax Wednesday morning.

The heat from flames that were visible for miles also damaged a nearby Arby's
restaurant and the front of Metro High School, across the street at 4015
McPherson. Summer school classes there were moved to Carr Lane Middle School.

Bystander Catherine Gilbert, a Metro High School junior, looked out over the
piles of smoldering ash later Wednesday and repeated a question on a lot of
minds: "Why? What's the intention?"

Robert Patrick and Margaret Gillerman of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this
report.

http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/new...3?OpenDocument
__________________
My Chicago Pics, July 2009

Last edited by djvandrake; Jun 15, 2007 at 3:12 AM. Reason: spelling
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #128  
Old Posted Jun 23, 2007, 12:48 AM
Arch City's Avatar
Arch City Arch City is offline
Proud Homer!
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 4,099
Renderings of Old Post Office Plaza in downtown St. Louis. Old Post Office Square has about $700-million in new and renovated projects completed or under construction. Construction on the new plaza is set to start next month.

The OPO Plaza will be adjacent to the new 24-story Roberts Tower, the first "green" condo high-rise in St. Louis.



















Source, bsnarchitects.com
__________________
Debating some people on the Internet is like debating dead people - it makes you look crazy so why bother? #BYE

Last edited by Arch City; Jun 23, 2007 at 2:15 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #129  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2007, 5:16 PM
djvandrake's Avatar
djvandrake djvandrake is offline
I'm going slightly mad.
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California
Posts: 788
Rumor has it that Centene will leave in a huff, and is being actively courted by cities in other states. This begs the question of WTF is wrong with putting their new headquarters in Downtown St. Louis? I'm sure a handsome incentive package would be forthcoming from city hall.

I just don't get it. Downtown is all of 10 minutes farther than Clayton for the commuting suburban types.

Quote:
Centene drops plan for $210M Clayton center
St. Louis Business Journal - July 6, 2007
Centene Corp., which lost an eminent domain battle in a legal fight that went to the Missouri Supreme Court, said Friday the company is aggressively pursuing other alternatives after the Clayton property owners failed to respond to new offers.

Centene spokesman Robert Schenk said in a statement: "Centene has made generous offers to the three real estate investors that own the (three) Forsyth properties. Having failed to receive a response to its offers, the company is now aggressively pursuing other alternatives."

Centene had planned to build a $210 million headquarters on the southwest corner of Hanley Road and Forsyth Boulevard. The property owners who prevailed in court were Debbie Pyzyk, Mint Properties' David Danforth and Dan Sheehan.

Centene Corp. provides managed care programs and related services to individuals under Medicaid. It also operates health plans in Georgia, Indiana, New Jersey, Ohio, Texas and Wisconsin.
http://stlouis.bizjournals.com/stlou...2/daily63.html
__________________
My Chicago Pics, July 2009
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #130  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2007, 1:10 AM
Arch City's Avatar
Arch City Arch City is offline
Proud Homer!
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 4,099
Bruce Development is renovating the old downtown Best Western hotel for $12-million renovation. It will become the Washington Avenue Apartments. There will be 95-rental units.











__________________
Debating some people on the Internet is like debating dead people - it makes you look crazy so why bother? #BYE
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #131  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2007, 6:39 AM
Arch City's Avatar
Arch City Arch City is offline
Proud Homer!
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 4,099
$100-million project planned for Midtown St. Louis

McCormack Baron, SLU plan on Grand
St. Louis Business Journal - June 29, 2007
by Lisa R. Brown


Saint Louis University and developer McCormack Baron Salazar are partnering on a $100 million plan to transform the intersection of Grand and Lindell, which is a main entry into the Grand Center arts and entertainment district. McCormack Baron's proposal for a 400,000-square-foot mixed-use development on 4.3 acres owned by the university calls for 100 condos, 155,000 square feet of retail space and 100,000 square feet of office space.

McCormack Baron plans to move its corporate headquarters and 300 employees from 1415 Olive St. downtown to about half the new office space upon completion in 2009. Part of the retail component includes plans for a multiscreen movie theater.

"Our hope is this will be a transformative project that will finally bring people to this area of the city," said Richard Baron, co-founder, chairman and chief executive of the real estate development firm. "We think the housing component is an important ingredient to provide more energy to the district."

The property, zoned for commercial use, is located in an $80 million tax increment finance district created in 2002. The university has sought for several years to develop the site, which includes a vacant parcel at the northeast corner of Grand and Lindell and a vacant lot north of the corner parcel at Olive and Theresa. The property is next to Pyramid Cos.' $30 million redevelopment of the Metropolitan building into a Hyatt Place hotel and is the gateway into Grand Center, which includes the Fox Theatre and Powell Symphony Hall.

The Grand and Lindell project will be McCormack Baron's third major project in the North Grand Boulevard area. In recent years, the company has completed work on the multiphase Blumeyer Housing Complex redevelopment, renamed the Renaissance at Grand, which totaled more than $100 million in development. McCormack Baron also is redeveloping the former Woolworth building at 501 N. Grand Blvd. into a new home for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri. That project totals more than $10 million.

The development team

McCormack Baron is interviewing two architectural firms, TEN Arquitectos and Ehrenkrantz, Eckstut & Kuhn Architects (EE&K), for the project at Grand and Lindell. EE&K is based in New York City, and TEN Arquitectos has offices in New York and Mexico City. Both firms have experience designing facilities in academic settings. A general contractor has not yet been selected for the project, which is set to get under way in spring 2008.

McCormack Baron is partnering on the project with Philadelphia-based U3 Ventures, led by principal Omar Blaik.

Source
__________________
Debating some people on the Internet is like debating dead people - it makes you look crazy so why bother? #BYE
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #132  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2007, 1:15 PM
djvandrake's Avatar
djvandrake djvandrake is offline
I'm going slightly mad.
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California
Posts: 788
This would be a really big deal for the riverfront area in South St. Louis city.

Quote:
Lemp Brewery target of $150 million development

By Jim Merkel
Friday, August 31, 2007 5:24 AM CDT


The Lemp Brewery's century-old warehouses at Lemp Avenue and South Broadway would be transformed into a $150 million dollar commercial and residential complex, according to plans rolled out by a Kansas City-area developer.

Garrison Development Co. wants to build 399 apartments and 56,000 square feet of commercial space on the 14-acre complex.

The project remains a big "maybe," as Garrison Development Co. of the Kansas City area, works on design, crunches the numbers and seeks federal and state tax credits and tax increment financing. But if it takes place, it would be one of the biggest projects on the South Side in years.

"If something would fall through, especially a major part of the financing, this whole project would fall down," said Alderman Kenneth Ortmann, D-9th Ward. He represents the area of the old 13.7-acre brewery site, which is surrounded by Cheokee, Lemp Avenue and South Broadway.

"We celebrate when they sign on the dotted lines," Ortmann said.

The project would be about one-half the size of Ballpark Village, a $387 million mix of retail, residential and entertainment venues planned for six downtown blocks next to Busch Stadium. Ballpark Village will receive about $115.8 million in state and local financing.
Source
http://suburbanjournals.stltoday.com...j_beer.ii1.txt
__________________
My Chicago Pics, July 2009
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #133  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2007, 7:57 AM
newstl2020's Avatar
newstl2020 newstl2020 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 364
We can officially add to the list the future Centene Corporation World Headquarters in downtown St. Louis. Major new 700,000 sq. ft. office tower with an additional 550,000 planned in a seperate tower on top of 2 stories of retail and 1750 parking spaces. First tower looks to be at least 400 feet tall, possibly approaching the 500 foot range. In addition, a third tower (details still unknown, most likely the 250 condo units which are a part of phase 1 of Ballpark Village) is shown in the initial models of BPV supplied by Centene. Height looks to be also around 450-500 feet. BIG NEWS FOR STL!!!



(Image from KDSK.com)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #134  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2007, 12:09 PM
cityguy's Avatar
cityguy cityguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: ottawa
Posts: 691
Great news for St.Louis.this should shift the skyline further to the south.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #135  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2007, 6:52 PM
Suburban Lou's Avatar
Suburban Lou Suburban Lou is offline
important
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Inner Exerbia
Posts: 4,708
Damn I really need to update the first post in this thread it's 2 years out of date!

More Centene
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #136  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2007, 7:01 PM
Suburban Lou's Avatar
Suburban Lou Suburban Lou is offline
important
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Inner Exerbia
Posts: 4,708
More Big News

Major retail district announced for downtown
By Riddhi Trivedi-St. Clair
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
09/26/2007



Architectural rendering of "The Laurel," a proposed redevelopment of the Dillard's store on Washington Avenue in downtown St. Louis

The developer of the much anticipated St. Louis Centre renovation has announced plans for a broader $400 million hotel, condo and shopping district and tapped a prominent national company to help find retailers.

The district is an expansion of the $280 million St. Louis Centre renovation proposed last year by St. Louis-based Pyramid Cos. General Growth Properties, the nation’s second largest publicly-traded real estate investment company, will handle retail leasing for the project. The company owns and operates the Saint Louis Galleria in Richmond Heights and Water Tower Place in Chicago.

The district, called the Mercantile Exchange, will include several buildings, all but one of which is owned by Pyramid and its partner, Spinnaker Real Estate Partners LLC of Connecticut.

• St. Louis Centre and the office tower on top, One City Centre, at 6th Street and Washington Avenue. The two will be renamed the Concord.

• The Mercantile Library building at 6th and Locust streets.

• The Macy’s building, formerly known as Railway Exchange Building. The building is owned by Cincinnati-based May Department Stores.

Advertisement


• The former Dillard’s building at Washington Avenue and 7th Street, will be renamed the Laurel.

The plan for Mercantile Exchange calls for 160,000 square feet of new retail, a 216-room hotel, 525,000 square feet of office space, as well as 175 condos and 120 luxury apartments.

The hotel, the apartments and 74 condos will be in the 580,000-square-foot Laurel building.

The district has about 1,200 parking spaces.

"We are starting now. Our goal is to have people moving in by end of next year," said John Steffen, chief executive of Pyramid. "In three years, we will see significant completion; in four years, a substantial portion will be completed, and in five years, it will be done."

This is the second major development announced this week for downtown St. Louis. Clayton-based Centene Corp. said Sunday it will moving its headquarters to Ballpark Village in downtown. Centene’s $250 million development will add up to 1.2 million square feet of office space, 50,000 to 75,000 square feet of retail space as well as a hotel Ballpark Village. That is in addition to the condos, 360,000 square feet of retail and 100,000 square feet of office already committed by Baltimore-based Cordish Co., developers of Ballpark Village.

Centene’s move will bring 1,200 new jobs to downtown.

The Laurel, will be the first portion of Steffen’s project to get underway with a grand opening scheduled for Thursday. The skybridge over Washington Avenue will be demolished in spring of 2008 with construction on the Concord building beginning in the summer. The skybridge linking the building to Macy’s on the other side will be demolished later in 2008.

Given the renaissance already underway in downtown, Steffen said, this is the perfect time for a retail district.

"Downtown is on an upswing and we can push the momentum up," Steffen said. "We are not working against the momentum as we were 20 years ago when downtown was going downward, this time we are working with the upward momentum."

Steffen said the time was right because downtown population has grown quickly in recent years. The population is estimated today at 10,000 to 13,000. Downtown, he said, has a overall healthy condo and loft market. Downtown also attracts a large number of business and leisure travelers.

The retail district will be anchored by the existing Macy’s, Steffen said, and added that Chicago-based General Growth would work to bring national retailers to downtown St. Louis.

General Growth owns, develops, operates and manages more than 200 regional malls in 44 states. The company is the largest third-party manager of regional malls. The company has 4,700 employees and its malls have 24,000 retail and department stores as well as theaters, restaurants and entertainment venues.

Being able to bring a company like General Growth to downtown St. Louis is a monumental accomplishment, said Mayor Francis Slay.

"It is a big company that does business in 44 states and they have recognized the potential and opportunity in St. Louis," Slay said.

At least 70 new restaurants and local businesses have opened in downtown in the last five years, Slay said, and what the city needs now is the kind of mainstream retailers that General Growth can bring to the market place.

"I am thrilled that one of the nation’s largest and most successful retail developers is coming to St. Louis," Slay said.

His goal for Mercantile Exchange is to have boutique-type stores on top of national retailers, Steffen said. Steffen also wants to have dining and entertainment venues in the district.

The development includes an extensive upgrade in streetscape. Steffen has secured $30 million in tax incentives under the state’s Downtown Economic Stimulus Act.

Those improvements will extend not only to Steffen’s project but will cover landscaping for about two-thirds of downtown streets, said Barbara Geisman, deputy mayor for development.

"That will allow people to visually tie the pedestrian areas together from the landscaping and bring all the projects together," she said.

The project also will receive $85 million in city tax breaks, Geisman said.

The Mercantile Exchange will complement other developments already planned for downtown, Steffen said, including Ballpark Village, Centene’s new development, and Pinnacle Entertainment Inc.’s new casino, Lumière Place, on Laclede’s Landing.

The hope is that all of them together will create greater density and draw more people to downtown, Steffen said.

"Let’s hope that someday we get to the point where tax incentives are no longer needed to get projects like this done in downtown," Steffen said.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #137  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2007, 6:50 PM
Xing's Avatar
Xing Xing is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 15,126
ty
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #138  
Old Posted Oct 2, 2007, 6:51 PM
Suburban Lou's Avatar
Suburban Lou Suburban Lou is offline
important
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Inner Exerbia
Posts: 4,708
Light-rail line could share city streets
By Ken Leiser
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
10/01/2007

St. Louis — Regional planners see a future where trains could share the road with cars through St. Louis neighborhoods and the downtown business district.

have drawn plans for a nearly 17-mile path where a light-rail MetroLink line would run from Goodfellow Boulevard and Interstate 70 in the north to Bayless Avenue in the south. It would wind through downtown St. Louis, reach Interstate 55 and Jefferson Avenue and then follow the I-55 right of way to Bayless.

But, local officials warn, the dream has a long way to go before it ever becomes reality. The plan has a price tag approaching $1 billion — in 2007 dollars — and, as of now, no money.

It also comes at a time when the agency that runs MetroLink has warned that it will need more money just to operate what it already has. Advertisement

For the new 17-mile line, the region would first have to prepare environmental studies, compete for federal money and raise a significant local share of the cost.

Elected leaders sitting on the East-West Gateway Council of Governments later this month will take up the idea.

"This could happen," St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said last week. "Funding is a huge issue here. If we wait until the funding is available to start the planning, we'll be left out. There is a lot of competition at the federal level for funds for mass transit."

East-West Gateway hired HNTB Corp., a transportation consultant, to work on the proposal. Kenneth Kinney, director of transit planning for HNTB, told the council last week that the line was drawn up after public meetings and talks with St. Louis political leaders and city staff.

Several corridors in the region are being eyed for future light-rail growth. The 17-mile line through the city would have to jockey for position with other local plans.

St. Louis County, for instance, is preparing to ask voters to increase the county sales taxes up to a half-cent to help fund MetroLink expansion in the county.

Metro, the agency that operates MetroLink, buses and paratransit services in the area, opened an eight-mile line from Forest Park to Shrewsbury last year and has warned that it needs additional money to continue its existing operations.

In this latest proposal, the concept is for light-rail trains to run alongside cars, Kinney said, "not in mixed traffic like the old street car, but in separate rights of way on streets."

On the north side, trains would run from Goodfellow down Natural Bridge Avenue to North Florissant Avenue to 14th Street. It would run "through the heart" of commercial and residential neighborhoods, Kinney said, and could stimulate future development.

Once it reached downtown St. Louis, MetroLink would continue to run on two parallel tracks before splitting into separate one-way tracks at Ninth and 10th streets.

Kinney said the proposed alignment was the "cleanest, simplest" approach to serve downtown.

From downtown, the alignment would follow Chouteau and Jefferson avenues before running alongside I-55.

"We would not be running in the median of (Interstate) 55, but we would be on one side or the other in order to be physically and psychologically closer to residential neighborhoods," he said.

Chris Poehler, a project manager for Metro, said the proposed light-rail line would be separate from the existing system, using vehicles that would be slightly different from the existing trains.

Those light-rail vehicles would have lower floors to accommodate street-level boarding, for instance.

Tom Sullivan, spokesman for the Public Transit Accountability Project, said the proposed line is "pie in the sky" and that north St. Louis first needs good buses that run on time.

"They act like reality is just something that doesn't seem part of their thinking," he said.

But Slay said mass transit projects like this one would make the region "more livable" and promote economic development.

"If we do not continue to focus on trying to find ways to expand our capabilities of mass transit, we will fall behind other areas," Slay said at last week's East-West Gateway meeting.

kleiser@post-dispatch.com | 314-340-8215

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #139  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2007, 4:14 AM
UrbaniDesDev's Avatar
UrbaniDesDev UrbaniDesDev is offline
Walkable CITIES!
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Posts: 422
Riverfront

I was in st Louis a while back. Beautiful city. Love the Warehouse District. I was very disapointed in the riverfront and the connection to the city. Are there any plans to develop the park and surrounding areas more? Im from Pittsburgh and we are going thru a complete transformation of our riverfronts and connections to the city. St Louis really seems to be ignoring it's greatest asset. Check out myPittsburgh thread here
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #140  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2007, 12:58 AM
Arch City's Avatar
Arch City Arch City is offline
Proud Homer!
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 4,099
Note: This project is different from the Old Post Office Plaza (renderings above) currently under construction.

Sculpture garden is planned for downtown
By David Bonetti
POST-DISPATCH VISUAL ARTS CRITIC
10/21/2007



(Nelson Byrd Landscape Architects)

Picture this: a two-block sculpture park with work by internationally renowned artists. The splash of a waterfall. A cafe overlooking sunny, spacious lawns and a shady grove of river birches.

That isn't downtown St. Louis. But it may be on its way.

On Monday, the city's Preservation Board is expected to approve a design for the downtown Gateway Mall that will include all those features in a $20 million to $25 million sculpture garden.

Architect Warren Byrd will present the final design.

[snip]

The design was conceived and executed by Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Designers of Charlottesville, Va.

In a phone interview, Byrd painted a vision of an interactive park with multiple uses. It should attract visitors who are not particularly lovers of sculpture as well as those who are.

"We needed to be open and inviting and accessible to everyone," he said.

One goal was to make the park appealing during the steamy summer. "The combination of shade (trees) and water should make the park appealing even on the hottest summer days," Byrd said.

Byrd was determined to incorporate appropriate natural and historical references into an urban, inherently artificial setting. His solution: Superimpose two plans — one geometric and rational, the other natural and organic — on each other.

Byrd acknowledged that his first response was to produce a totally gridded design. That would relate to the street patterns that define the site. But the interview committee challenged him to consider something more natural.

Source

More renderings.











__________________
Debating some people on the Internet is like debating dead people - it makes you look crazy so why bother? #BYE
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 4:38 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.