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  #41  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 6:18 PM
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34 Stories, 426'(?)







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  #42  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 7:03 PM
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34 Stories, 426'(?)







I LOVE this proposal! It fills the vacant lot really well. Build this NOW!
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  #43  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 7:08 PM
New2Fishtown New2Fishtown is offline
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I LOVE this proposal! It fills the vacant lot really well. Build this NOW!
You must have missed the part showing the rooftop French Village, brought back from the dead Provence project: http://www.phila.gov/CityPlanning/pr...e%20Upload.pdf

An utterly asinine idea that doesn't stand a chance of success. Bring those rooftop small tenants down to street level, allow them to line the perimeters of the big box stores, thereby establishing a walkable and very Philadelphian feel along Washington and Broad. Then we're talking.
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  #44  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 7:36 PM
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why wouldn't Bart put the tower at the corner of Broad and Wash, as far away as possible from the school and houses?

I'm happy if he can get this built, but it could certainly be massed more elegantly. This is a monster. I don't think it has a chance.
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  #45  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 8:02 PM
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why wouldn't Bart put the tower at the corner of Broad and Wash, as far away as possible from the school and houses?

I'm happy if he can get this built, but it could certainly be massed more elegantly. This is a monster. I don't think it has a chance.
So the village concept gets the southern exposure.
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  #46  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 8:03 PM
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Originally Posted by New2Fishtown View Post
You must have missed the part showing the rooftop French Village, brought back from the dead Provence project: http://www.phila.gov/CityPlanning/pr...e%20Upload.pdf

An utterly asinine idea that doesn't stand a chance of success. Bring those rooftop small tenants down to street level, allow them to line the perimeters of the big box stores, thereby establishing a walkable and very Philadelphian feel along Washington and Broad. Then we're talking.
I don't hate it. People said the Highline was a stupid idea and look at it now. I could actually see this becoming an attraction.
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  #47  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 8:25 PM
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So the village concept gets the southern exposure.
Ah. Thank you.
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  #48  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 8:29 PM
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I love it actually, good on him for showing up finally. I think the rooftop idea is gonna work just fine there's more than enough residents living in the building itself to keep it sustained, plus by the time (if) this gets built I expect more residents and shops to flood the area giving it more exposure. Lets not forget how close this is to South, and right on the subway, consider it another node on broad where we'll see infill in all directions, much like Divine Loraine. High hopes for the future of Washington ave.!
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  #49  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 9:21 PM
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Give the man a building permit and let's get going
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  #50  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 10:00 PM
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That rooftop Village is Dope. Lets not lose creativity here. That would be a very sick, different experience being in that environment. That's part of Architecture.

Build It!

It's down right genius actually. Would I want to go up there and get drunk in a secluded area. Yes...Yes I would...

Very Piazza-esque. I see it being a millennial haven.
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  #51  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 10:07 PM
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I don't hate it. People said the Highline was a stupid idea and look at it now. I could actually see this becoming an attraction.
Comparing this to the High Line is (sort of) like comparing Cira Green to the High Line. Nothing wrong with Cira Green (well built, nice views, innovative use of otherwise useless space), but they are fundamentally different products. Cira Green is a single standalone space mostly out of sight and mostly isolated from other pedestrian destinations. The High Line is a highly visible park passing through some of the most visually and architecturally striking neighborhoods in the world, with occasional views of the river and the rush of Manhattan traffic. It has many entrances and exits, can be seen from hundreds of street locations, and provides pedestrians a way to navigate between major destinations. There are lots of reasons to walk under, near, or along the High Line, and millions of people do it every month.

This "village" is much more comparable to Cira Green than the High Line, and no amount of high quality tenants or finishes will change the fundamentals of that. The village has a single entrance (at a currently non descript corner of 13th and Washington), cannot be seen from the street, doesn't connect you to anywhere, and won't offer views beyond the tower above it. I'll admit it is theoretically on the way to things being at this major intersection, and I don't doubt the immediate success of a grocery, Target, and other daily-life-serving tenants at ground level, but I'm failing to imagine strong demand for luxury items, meals, or other trinkets fifty feet in the air.

I'd like to think that 1,000 units plus the nearby neighborhoods would give this the necessary foot traffic to work, but foot traffic on Broad and on Washington is so scarce around here, with several blocks of little to nothing between this and the next node of activity, that there's really just no way it works. There are 500 units above the Piazza's businesses, and an exploding neighborhood all around it, and the Piazza's businesses are meagerly used at best at any given hour of the day. Some of this is management and picking a smart mix of tenants for the sizes of the spaces and the surrounding demographics, but some of it is that the Piazza remains cut off from Fishtown to the north by surface lots, and is removed enough from the rapidly improving 2nd Street scene that it feels out of the way to people out and about in the neighborhood.

Fundamentally, my objection to the village is one grounded in the idea that Blatstein is fundamentally misunderstanding Philadelphia, and has gotten it wrong pretty much every time. This corner can and should be a lively connecting point between Point Breeze, GHo, Bella Vista/Hawthorne, and Passyunk Square, and with regard to the project's visibility, density, and scale, it certainly manages to assert itself as an anchor and a node, which I appreciate. The village supports this idea on paper, but what it would do in practice (if it were successful) is pull energy off of the streets which need energy desperately. I'd be much more inclined to walk the 1300 block of Washington if six of these would-be village tenants had storefronts breaking up the facade at street level, taking little blocks of space behind which the mega tenants would be hiding (this is a very common way to stack tenants in urban big box projects). This way the block gets a more typical neighborhood scale row of shops AND the urban large-format retailer, all on one level. Walking an entire city block's worth of semi-transparent grocery or Target windows is far less appealing, and knowing that I could grab a La Colombe on the roof would be unlikely to sway me.
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  #52  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 11:23 PM
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Yup. 34 floors, 426 feet tall. Build it!!

More from Plan Philly:





Article:
http://planphilly.com/articles/2016/...oad-washington
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  #53  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 11:23 PM
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  #54  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 11:26 PM
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CDR Submission - 1001 S. Broad Street

If you notice, there is an 11 story residential building fronting 13th and Washington Ave as well:

http://www.phila.gov/CityPlanning/pr...e%20Upload.pdf
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  #55  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 11:36 PM
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  #56  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 11:54 PM
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Big lot, big building, big development.

What happened to all of the original renderings for historical perspective of evolution of the development?
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  #57  
Old Posted Feb 18, 2016, 1:58 AM
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Love it. Hope it gets built as-is. Broad + Washington needs something different like this.
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  #58  
Old Posted Feb 18, 2016, 2:22 AM
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Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post


I don't get the orientation. The tower is L shaped and the smaller portion is fronting Broad and the larger portion is fronting Carpenter. Why? Why wouldn't the tallest parts of the project face Broad and Washington? It reminds me of the tower portion of 1900 fronting Samson instead of Chestnut. It seems odd.

Here's the thing. This is a girthy building. If the NIMBYs make it shorter (and is this something Blatstein is anticipating?), I'm afraid of what this will look like.

Of course 400 feet is perfectly appropriate to everyone here for Broad Street especially near a subway stop. But the NIMBYs will flip.
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  #59  
Old Posted Feb 18, 2016, 3:23 AM
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Well color me surprised, I actually like it. I'm not sure what kind if retailer would want to be on the roof, hidden from most pedestrians, however. I'd rather have retail capacity absorbed elsewhere so that it's actually fronting the streets.
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  #60  
Old Posted Feb 18, 2016, 12:28 PM
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[QUOTE=summersm343;7339365]Yup. 34 floors, 426 feet tall. Build it!!

More from Plan Philly:


Here's the project summary: Located on the corner of South Broad Street and Washington Avenue, the proposed 4.4-acre site will be approximately 1,800,000 square feet of retail and residential. The " 371-foot-high building " will need zoning variances for roof decks for non-residential use and a parking garage.



At the moment , there seems to be a difference of opinion regarding overall height .....
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