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  #11021  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 8:04 PM
CastleScott CastleScott is offline
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^ Sounds cool-thanks bunt!

Oh btw I'll kinda miss how that elevated I-70 viaduct over 48th Ave sorta gave Denver a bit of a big city back east kinda feel (back when I was in college I helped a friend who was majoring in film do a lil car chase scene in that location and also under the old 20th Street viaduct back in 1983).

And Happy Holidays to all!
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  #11022  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 6:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DenPost
Testing of RTD’s long-delayed G-Line to Arvada and Wheat Ridge can resume, judge says

A judge gave RTD approval late Tuesday to resume full testing of the long-delayed G-Line commuter train to Arvada and Wheat Ridge, a move that should help the transit agency get the 11-mile rail line open to the public more quickly.

Regional Transportation District spokesman Scott Reed said he didn’t know how long testing would take, saying only that it would probably last “months” and that approvals from both state and federal regulators would be needed before revenue service could begin.

The G-Line was originally set to open to the public in October 2016.

City leaders in Arvada and Wheat Ridge have lambasted the PUC for the delayed opening of the G-Line. The Arvada City Council signed off on a letter this fall that read “the continued, open-ended delay in commencing passenger service on the G-Line has real-world consequences for our communities and citizens.

“Our patience is at an end.”
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  #11023  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2017, 8:18 PM
CastleScott CastleScott is offline
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^ Finally out to my original hometown! I remember when RTD's original plan was for diesel push-pull sets, although the electric trains are sleek and nice.
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  #11024  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 12:49 AM
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New Year's Ketchup

JustRide Bustang App Gives Riders Access To Tickets, Schedules

Ribbon Cutting Signals Completion Of I-25 & Arapahoe Project
What I want to know is which one of you Yahoo's will drive this completed project and give us street level report?

Shuffling the Shuttle: Could This Be the Dawn of a New Era for Denver's Iconic Main Street?
An nice article in Confluence Denver from way back in Oct, it's about the 16th Street Mall and a good read.
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  #11025  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 3:13 PM
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Nice to see the Governor back the importance of road funding

Hickenlooper calls for more transportation spending in Colorado budget
Jan 3, 2018 By Ed Sealover - DBJ
Quote:
Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper has reversed course and called for new general-fund spending for transportation in next year’s state budget — a move that could give a significant boost to business groups’ efforts to help roads, bridges and transit.
Meaning what exactly?
Quote:
The Democratic governor sent a letter to the Colorado Legislature's Joint Budget Committee late Tuesday requesting that $148.2 million of the expected $256.5 million in newly forecast general-fund revenues for the fiscal year beginning on July 1 be put to transportation.
Hickenlooper also want the balance to go into the “rainy day fund.” I approve of both.
FWIW, I also think this is 'politically' wise.
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  #11026  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 5:18 PM
DenvertoLA DenvertoLA is offline
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Is there any word on building a rail from downtown to Cherry Creek? I feel like all these rail lines are connecting the suburbs and leaving downtown unconnected.
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  #11027  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 6:29 PM
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Yeah. None.

There's been talk about upgrading the bus service between Cherry Creek and Downtown as part of the Denver Moves: Transit study. It wouldn't be a BRT corridor, but would see enhanced service (better bus stop amenities, frequency, and somewhat reduced travel time).
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  #11028  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 6:30 PM
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There are no plans for rail specifically, but there is a vision to have a downtown to Cherry Creek transit corridor. Most likely, this will be enhanced bus service or BRT.

Check out the proposed transit corridors from the latest Denver Moves Transit plan:

PDF: https://www.denvergov.org/content/da...rridor-map.pdf
URL: http://myemail.constantcontact.com/H...id=lPl0GIptYpI
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  #11029  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 7:03 PM
Launch 12 Launch 12 is offline
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New RTD map

Thought folks would be interested in the new RTD map that shows train lines and the Flatiron Flyer.

http://www.rtd-denver.com/img/map/rail-fare-map.pdf
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  #11030  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 7:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wong21fr View Post
Yeah. None.

There's been talk about upgrading the bus service between Cherry Creek and Downtown as part of the Denver Moves: Transit study. It wouldn't be a BRT corridor, but would see enhanced service (better bus stop amenities, frequency, and somewhat reduced travel time).
From a past discussion on this forum that shows the main urban transit routes as underground subway. I think that's a pipe dream except for possibly Union Station to Civic Center but I can't even fathom how much that would cost. Maybe it would be better to have a streetcar with dedicated lanes through downtown and on Broadway/Lincoln, BRT with dedicated lanes on Colfax and possibly streetcar to Cherry Creek as well.

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  #11031  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 8:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BG918 View Post
From a past discussion on this forum that shows the main urban transit routes as underground subway.
They do it elsewhere so why not in Denver?


Image: Guangzhou Metro via NextCity

China Gets Nearly 100 New Miles of Urban Subway Lines
JANUARY 3, 2018 BY SANDY SMITH - NextCity
Quote:
The largest metro opening took place on Dec. 28, when a total of 82 km (51 miles) of new lines and extensions opened in the city of Guangzhou. Three new metro lines entered service that day: the initial sections of Lines 9 and 14 and the entirety of Line 13.
Denver should be able to do at least a mile of subway; cost about $650 million I suspect.
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  #11032  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 8:25 PM
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Holy moly a BREXIT in Boulder?
Quote:
That has left members of Boulder’s City Council questioning whether they should do a Brexit-style secession from the transit agency.
Growth, Declining Ridership And Individual City Plans Are Presenting Headwinds For RTD
JAN 4, 2018 BY ALLISON SHERRY - Colorado Public Radio
Quote:
Two of the state’s largest city governments say their ambitious transportation plans to ease future congestion are likely beyond what the Regional Transportation District, the metro area’s current transit authority, can provide — and they are exploring other options to move people around.
Well we know about Denver Moves but just how big are Boulder's eyes?
Quote:
Boulder officials hope to expand bus service to the point where residents don’t even need a schedule, they can just walk out the door and onto a bus within a few minutes. The city already buys up additional bus service from RTD, but city transportation chief Mike Gardner-Sweeney said they are looking at other options for the future.
You go, Boulder. To be fair their more limited size does give them more options and ability to execute.
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  #11033  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 9:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Launch 12 View Post
Thought folks would be interested in the new RTD map that shows train lines and the Flatiron Flyer.

http://www.rtd-denver.com/img/map/rail-fare-map.pdf
Holy crap, that is fantastic!
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  #11034  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 12:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dirt View Post
Holy crap, that is fantastic!
I had to look at the link about a dozen times to see if this was actually on RTD's site....because I figured it made way too much sense to be from RTD and kept assuming it was a forumer who made it...finally RTD, finally a good map!
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  #11035  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 5:26 AM
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Ouch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nashville Business Journal
Nashville's mass-transit plan is strong precisely because it's not like Denver's

For years, the Mile High City has been touted by city leaders as the holy grail of what Nashville could be if it adopted a comprehensive mass-transit plan. However, Jon Orcutt, the former director of policy at the New York City Department of Transportation, said the reason Mayor Megan Barry's $5.4 billion proposal is strong is because it's not like Denver. Instead, Orcutt — who consulted on Metro's three-year transportation plan released in May — said he encouraged Nashville to take inspiration from another western city: Seattle.

"One of the things we really like about [Nashville's plan] is that it’s a city-focused plan," Orcutt said in a phone conversation with the Nashville Business Journal. "It doesn’t involve regional compromises, with cities demanding they get a line out to their county. … In Denver now, it’s easier to get from [an] external city to the central business district than it is neighborhood to neighborhood. The city market has been neglected."
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  #11036  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 8:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
Ouch.
I hadn't seen that; I did read this: https://usa.streetsblog.org/2018/01/...ng-hired-guns/
Quote:
Take Denver, which has built an extensive rail system that caters more to unwalkable suburbs than city neighborhoods where transit works best.
This is just the same ole, same ole "it's not a textbook system." We've discussed this ad nauseum already. BTW, I had said THIS when you first brought up Nashville's proposal... and I'm not a paid hack for Nashville.

Angie's article also said:
Quote:
And the plan avoids political compromises that have weakened rail expansions in cities like Seattle and Los Angeles, which cater to distant suburbs. The Nashville plan is squarely about improving service in the city, where the need for good transit is greatest.
My own comment on Streetsblog USA since deleted went like this:
Quote:
The criticism of Denver's light rail system is fair. That said, Denver has a 'regional' transit system and metro Denver got what the voters said they wanted and agreed to pay for. Those who judge based on the need for immediate gratification are not always the wisest. The system is visionary and intended to direct future TOD throughout the system and many metro cities. Stay tuned.
As much as I would commend Nashville I do have one question. As proposed the price tag is $5.2 billion and would be paid for by a half cent sales tax plus increases to the city’s hotel-motel tax, rental car tax and business and excise tax. I see where it has to be approved by Davidson County voters. According to Google Maps, Davidson County covers a sizable area anchored by Nashville. The key question is this plan 'politically' feasible meaning are the voters likely to approve it? It's great that the plan was not 'compromised by politics' but it's politics that will have to approve the plan.
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  #11037  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 8:47 PM
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I'll have to come back to 'suburban rail' later as I have some interesting thoughts and suggestions.
But it's time to turn the page.

That shattering sound you heard came from Denver International Airport.

DIA expects to shatter passenger record with 2017 traffic
Jan 3, 2018 by Ben Miller - DBJ
Quote:
Denver International Airport officials say they expect 2017 passenger traffic to shatter previous records.

They're estimating 61 million passengers used the airport last year, shattering the previous record in 2016 of 58.3 million passengers. Final traffic numbers aren't expected until next month, they said.
The Governor on his recent CNBC appearance mentioned that DEN was the 5th busiest airport in the country. Did he have inside info or was he just aware of the likelihood that DEN jumped over JFK? Denver was only behind JFK by 600,000 passengers so it would be hardly a surprise if DEN retook the 5th place spot.

‘It’s Phenomenal’: I-25 Expansion Coming Sooner Than Expected
January 4, 2018 By Jeff Todd - CBS4 Denver
Quote:
LOVELAND, Colo. (CBS4) – A badly-needed expansion to Interstate 25 is coming to a stretch between Johnstown and the northern edge of Fort Collins.

“It’s a huge deal. It’s phenomenal. When we first started as an I-25 coalition about four years ago, we were told we wouldn’t see improvements along this corridor until 2075,” said Weld County Commissioner Barbara Kirkmeyer.

The Colorado Department of Transportation announced on Thursday construction will start this summer with three lanes in each direction expected to be completed in 2021.
How did you pull this together?
Quote:
Over the past few years many communities have come together to help raise the money necessary for the project.

Larimer and Weld Counties, Fort Collins, Berthoud, Johnstown, Windsor, Loveland, Timnath, McWhinney and others came together to raise $55 million. A federal grant also brought money to the table to help CDOT reach the $248 million dollar price tag.
Yes, this will have an Express Lane but it's not a P3.
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  #11038  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2018, 6:05 PM
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Updated nuts and bolts of RTD rail transit ridership

May 17th to Aug 17th station activity compared to the previous report dated Jan 17 to May 17

What caught me by surprise
Ridership at Colfax at Auraria station dropped from 11,324 to 6,006 while the Auraria West station dropped from 7,134 to 4,550. Anybody got a guess as to why? Took me a moment before the light came one.

One notable drop that didn't surprise me
Nine Mile station fell from 6,591 to 5,910. No longer an end of line station some riders have gravitated to other R Line stations. Not counting DUS or DIA, Nine Mile dropped from 5th busiest station to 7th. The only non-central Denver station that was busier is Lincoln station.

Notable increases
  • Peoria station jumped from 4,998 to 6,095 an increase of 22%
  • Central Park station rose from 4,116 to 4,601 an increase of 12%.
  • Florida station increased from 1,780 to 2,162 and increase of 21.5% I should add I originally thought Florida would be a dog of a station but it now comes in 29th out of 59 stations so dead middle of the pack.
  • A small H/T to Westminster station as its ridership of 1,464 comes in 41st which is still better than many W Line or R Line stations.
  • With respect to the R Line, Iliff station ridership improved by 36% (no doubt many came from Nine Mile) and Aurora Metro Center improved by a modest 16%. Other than for Colfax which still surprises for its low ridership the rest are no-hopers until lots of TOD happens.

The only notable drop I happen to notice (not counting Auraria) was Southmoor station which dropped from 4,921 to 4,286.

The next report with school back in session should be more interesting.
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  #11039  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2018, 7:51 PM
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Denver and Density

Anybody know why professional planners and our Streetsblog-type friends want light/commuter rail to run through dense neighborhoods?
It's because they're lazy. Eh, I'm only kidding (well sort of).
OTOH, I have the benefit of a mind uncluttered by textbooks.

First, it's important to recall what Denver looked like 15 to 20 years ago when RTD invented light rail. Outside of Capitol Hill, Denver had precious little density. Post-war development, neighborhoods like Virginia Vale, U-Hills, Wellshire etc were all car-centric and not dense. Other than a modest number of apartments like off Colorado Blvd where the CU Med Center was and east Denver/Aurora near Colfax most of the 1950's apartments were in the suburbs - Englewood and Littleton comes to mind.

The 1960's saw a continuation of the same except there were a lot of those 3-story outside walk-up apartments built. Jordan Perlmutter built a ton of them including along So Monaco but most were in the NW suburbs.

Obviously there is some density variance in older Denver neighborhoods but outside of Cap Hill (including north of Colfax), there just wasn't a lot of density. The best transit corridor - East Colfax - unsurprisingly runs through this area and benefits from a more transit-dependent demo.

According to the urbanist elites from back East (not Cirrus) Denver didn't deserve light and commuter rail. Too bad; suck it up buttercup; it's already done and at a cost that can only make others drool and weep.

At the risk of repeating myself let me repeat myself. https://news.usc.edu/126791/how-tran...he-difference/
Quote:
The different ways riders leave and arrive at the stops closest to home and workplaces — what researchers term “first- and last-mile access” — can close this gap, even more effectively than more traditional and costly public transit measures like increasing transit frequency by adding buses and drivers.

Those distances that bookend a commute are crucial, according to the study’s lead author, Marlon Boarnet, a professor of public policy and chair of the department of urban planning and spatial analysis at the USC Price School of Public Policy.
The USC study which related to San Diego reflects most cities in Fly-over country including cities west of the Mississippi. Few cities have the ready-made density of NYC/DC, Chicago or San Francisco.

While Park N Rides help, more needs to be done with respect to suburban access to LRT stations. It's really not RTD's responsibility; that falls to the metro area in general and communities in particular. Only Lone Tree has taken this seriously although Golden has made some effort.

An updated D-Met Transport should include a strategy for easing and encouraging first and last mile access. It could include RTD offering matching funds for example.

Eventually TOD will happen. But to build a $6 billion rail transit network but neglect accessibility is just plain dumb... and lazy.
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  #11040  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2018, 10:21 PM
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Here's an interesting question (1st NFL game was boring)

But first, let's take a look at the Top Nine stations for ridership that is over 5,500 from the most recent report.
  1. Union Station - 31,300
  2. Denver Airport - 12,201
  3. 16th Street Stations - 11,731
  4. I-25 & Broadway - 11,400
  5. 18th Street Stations - 8,186
  6. Peoria Station - 6,095
  7. Colfax at Auraria - 6,006
  8. Lincoln Station - 5,970
  9. Nine Mile Station - 5,910
Note: Lincoln Station is currently an 'end of line' station but three new stations will be added in 2019 when the SE Extension opens.

Of the top nine stations for ridership '5' are in central Denver and '4' are in the suburbs. If we look at the next 11 stations or #'s 10-20, I count '5' stations in central Denver, '2' in the city but outside of the central city ie Colorado Blvd and DU stations with '4' stations located in the suburbs.

QUESTION: With respect to those stations within the central part of the city, how many of the riders or what percentage would represent Denver residents as opposed to suburban residents? I honestly have no idea. Any guesses?
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