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  #61  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2013, 4:39 PM
Razor Razor is offline
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A lil ot, but as a Canadian, I find it fascinating that you Americans have so many geographical regions all having large urban centers ..If you have career that is urban- centric you have all these choices..We just aren't as mobile up here. You can go from living in Boston to Chicago to San Fran and back to the mid-west in Minneapolis.Let alone Dallas or Atlanta if desired..This is why you are more apt to run into or know someone from your home-town in any of our larger centres...It's true!
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  #62  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2013, 5:01 PM
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My personal definition: Cleveland on the east to Lincoln/Wichita on the west, Canada on the north to Wichita/Springfield, MO/Cincinnati, OH on the south. Tulsa, Louisville, and Pittsburgh are just outside what I'd call the Midwest, and I'd lump the High Plains with the West before the Midwest. Basically, it's the large areas of North woods and croplands (but north of Oklahoma).
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  #63  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 3:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Box View Post
The Midwest to me has always been the Dakotas, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Michigan
Yep. That fits my definition. People throwing out areas like Pittsburgh, Texas and Utah is just crazy. Those are not midwest at all.
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  #64  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2014, 2:56 PM
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Centropolis Centropolis is offline
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Oklahoma is a funky one, Tulsa resembles Kansas City in many ways, whereas OKC looks towards Dallas. Tulsa and Louisville are both heavily transitional, though, towards the southern plains and the southeast. Even in Springfield, MO you start to feel a bit of a southern plains pull.
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  #65  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2014, 8:23 PM
ATXboom ATXboom is offline
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There is great overlap between regions, all driven by personal perception. Here are some good maps that show perception studies: http://www.geog.nau.edu/courses/alew...pters/ch1.html

For instance, Ohio is both midwest and northeast. Texas is both south and southwest.

I grew up in northern Ohio as associate more with Great Lakes or Rust Belt than midwest... but if you live near the border of Indian that would be different. I now live in Austin and this is not South culturally but if I head to east texas it is.

Midwest typically means grain belt like Iowa, Kansas, etc. Then what is the difference between great plains and midwest? I imagine everyone has a different answer based on where they've lived and been.
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  #66  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2014, 7:39 PM
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creamcityleo79 creamcityleo79 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guiltyspark View Post
Yep. That fits my definition. People throwing out areas like Pittsburgh, Texas and Utah is just crazy. Those are not midwest at all.
My definition, too! To me, Midwest is a mix of Rust Belt/Great Lakes big cities (Milwaukee, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Indianapolis, St. Louis, etc), Plains (KC, Omaha, Fargo, Minneapolis-St Paul), and smaller, urban, industrialized cities (ie. Dayton, Madison, Peoria, Cedar Rapids). Tulsa, SLC, and Denver are NOT Midwest!

Some background on me...originally from California, I have also lived in Milwaukee, Menomonie (Western WI), and the Twin Cities (where I currently live). I have also lived in Springfield, MO and Colorado Springs and I have spent considerable time in the Midwest, Pacific West, and Intermountain West region.
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  #67  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2014, 5:21 PM
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The North One The North One is offline
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I've never understood why we were called the Midwest, we're nowhere near the west coast, if anything we're the Mideast.

And lol, whoever told you Salt lake city is in the Midwest needs a geography lesson.
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  #68  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2014, 1:56 AM
surplusQ surplusQ is offline
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Originally Posted by The North One View Post
I've never understood why we were called the Midwest, we're nowhere near the west coast, if anything we're the Mideast.

And lol, whoever told you Salt lake city is in the Midwest needs a geography lesson.
When the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 was passed, we were considered the far west frontier. When the Louisiana Purchase was made, our border extended further to the west coast. The area between the Rockies and the Appalachians was thus called the Midwest, and the name stuck.
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