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  #61  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2018, 3:28 AM
dennis dennis is offline
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Originally Posted by flar View Post
When I was a little kid, my friend's backyard had a scraggly tree with ugly yellow fruits on it. We called it a quincy tree and his mom told us not to eat the fruit. As kids, we assumed it was poison.

Now that I'm back in SW Ontario, I went to look for the tree, and unfortunately it's gone (and so is my friend's old house). Yesterday I went to one of the orchards down the road from where I currently live and they were selling this fruit, which I immediately recognized. It is actually called a quince. I now believe the old lady that owned the house used the fruit to make jam.



These trees are actually native to Turkey and Iran. The trees grow almost anywhere but do well in southern ontario's climate as they require a long summer for the fruit to fully ripen. I read that older apple and pear orchards often planted a few quince trees. They are used to make marmelade and jams, and can be thrown into apple pies to enhance the flavour. The fruit is a bit bigger than an apple.

The fruit smells like when you cut into an apple, but very perfumey. It can't be eaten raw, but tastes good when cooked. I sliced them up and simmered them for about half an hour. It's kind of like a pear crossed with a peach but with a rose-like aroma. It's pretty good, I'm gonna grab a few more.

Make sure you eat the quince with a runcible spoon. (From the children’s poem “the owl and the pussy cat”.)
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  #62  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2018, 1:18 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is online now
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They dined on mince and slices of quince,
which they ate with a runcible spoon
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  #63  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2018, 4:27 PM
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Runcible spoon, I had to look that one up. It's either a nonsense word, or what we now call a "spork"
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  #64  
Old Posted Nov 3, 2018, 12:00 AM
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Went for a walk along Lake Erie this evening. Noticed a lot of berries. My guess is winterberry, dogwood and American cranberry.











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Last edited by flar; Nov 3, 2018 at 5:49 PM.
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  #65  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2018, 7:52 PM
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^ Nice. Those berries will be very important as things get colder.

Lower Don Lands Redevelopment is going to be a major boost to the ecosystem and biodiversity of Toronto's waterfront. Together with Tommy Thompson Park this will form one of the most impressive urban natural habitats on the continent as the new river valley enters Lake Ontario near the Toronto Islands and Leslie Street Spit.

















Construction is underway on that project. In essence it will be connected with Tommy Thompson Park which I started the thread with. Don Lands are to the upper left


Link to the Don Lands development:
https://waterfrontoronto.ca/nbe/wcm....df?MOD=AJPERES
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  #66  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2018, 11:51 PM
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Dr Awesomesauce Dr Awesomesauce is offline
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Originally Posted by flar View Post
Went for a walk along Lake Erie this evening. Noticed a lot of berries. My guess is winterberry, dogwood and American cranberry.











Is this near the mouth of the Detroit River?
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  #67  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 2:17 AM
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CBC News: 'It blows my mind': How B.C. destroys a key natural wildfire defence every year

Quote:
Last year, 12,812 hectares of B.C. forest was sprayed with the herbicide glyphosate. It's an annual event — a mass extermination of broadleaf trees mandated by the province.

The eradication of trees like aspen and birch on regenerating forest stands is meant to make room for more commercially valuable conifer species like pine and Douglas fir.

But experts say it also removes one of the best natural defences we have against wildfire, at a time when our warming climate is helping make large, destructive fires more and more common.
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