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  #11481  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Experts on such things would probably say it was January 1, 2001. The year 2000 was actually the last year of the 20th century.
Yeah, that makes more sense. Just nobody really thinks of it that way even though I'm intuitively sure you're correct.
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  #11482  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 3:33 PM
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I and most other probably most other people refer to 2000 as the first year of this century and millennium. Just as 1980 was the first year of the 80s decade, 1960 as the first of the sixties. One thing that I have felt is that in this new century, there doesn’t seem to be as much of a distinction between decades. When 2010 rolled around, It didn’t feel to me as though we were entering a new decade compared to the decades in the past century.
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  #11483  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 3:37 PM
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Originally Posted by dennis View Post
I and most other probably most other people refer to 2000 as the first year of this century and millennium. Just as 1980 was the first year of the 80s decade, 1960 as the first of the sixties.
You and just about everyone else. It's really only tediously pedantic people who even raise this as an issue anymore.
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  #11484  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 5:16 PM
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I've noticed that it's becoming a thing for people to start referring to years in 2 digits again. Saying things like, "oh, this license will expire in August of 19". I expect that "the twenties" will start being used in the 2020s to refer to the then-current decade.
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  #11485  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 6:06 PM
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Originally Posted by CityTech View Post
I've noticed that it's becoming a thing for people to start referring to years in 2 digits again. Saying things like, "oh, this license will expire in August of 19". I expect that "the twenties" will start being used in the 2020s to refer to the then-current decade.
For those of us who were born in the middle part of the twentieth century, this could be a source of great confusion.

To us, talk about "the thirties" conjures up images of the dustbowl and the great depression. In a few decades the "thirties" may be considered emblematic of massive coastal flooding and the extinction of the polar bear population in the Arctic.

The question will be "which thirties are you talking about"?????
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  #11486  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 6:12 PM
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Originally Posted by CityTech View Post
I've noticed that it's becoming a thing for people to start referring to years in 2 digits again. Saying things like, "oh, this license will expire in August of 19". I expect that "the twenties" will start being used in the 2020s to refer to the then-current decade.
When I think about the twentieth century, I think about the decades where you could refer to a decade in a way that rolls off the tongue "the twenties, the forties, the sixties, the nineties, etc." I don't think about the "aughts" or the "teens".

I think that WW1, which ended very conveniently close to 1920, was a cleavage point that defined the "beginning" of the 20th century. The things that predated WW1 just feel like the extension of the 19th century: Old Europe, industrial revolution, colonialism, etc. And the things that came after it are the things I associate with the 20th century: consumer society, mass production, communism, mobile warfare, etc.

The 21st century doesn't really have that psychological cleavage point yet. Man, I'd hate to think about what that will be, and when it will happen.
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  #11487  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 6:28 PM
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Originally Posted by dennis View Post
I and most other probably most other people refer to 2000 as the first year of this century and millennium. Just as 1980 was the first year of the 80s decade, 1960 as the first of the sixties. One thing that I have felt is that in this new century, there doesn’t seem to be as much of a distinction between decades. When 2010 rolled around, It didn’t feel to me as though we were entering a new decade compared to the decades in the past century.
Yeah, of course, because that's not the same thing. When we say "the 1980s" we mean "the bunch of years of the 198x format", not "the years slotting between completed 1980th year since the calendar began, and completed 1990th year since the calendar began".

1980 was the first year of the 1980s.
2000 was the first year of the 2000s (as well as the last year of the 20th century, and the last year of the second millennium.)
1000 was the first year of the 1000s.
2001 was the first year of the third millennium.

Maybe I'm just so used to these concepts that they come naturally, but I don't see anything hard to grasp or contradictory in there.
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  #11488  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 6:52 PM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
The 21st century doesn't really have that psychological cleavage point yet. Man, I'd hate to think about what that will be, and when it will happen.
One might argue that September 11, 2001 was such a cleavage point, at least for the West.

It was a fairly dramatic event and really changed the type of dialog we have politically and culturally - very much us versus them. It was the beginning of the end of the 1990s idea that modern liberalism would eventually prevail the world around.

The things that happened thereafter - the rise of China, smartphones and the internet becoming ubiquitous, the polarization of politics in western nations, smaller festering 'wars' that slowly sap the public's enthusiasm have very much a 21st century feel.
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  #11489  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 1:02 AM
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I heard someone once use 1991 as this "cleavage point" so to speak, arguing that the "19th century" spanned from the French Revolution (1789) to World War I (1914-1918), and the "20th century" spanned from World War I to the Fall of Communism (1989-1991). To me this seems a little forced though; the 90s feels much more like an extension of the 20th century than the early stages of the 21st.

I think that the economic crisis of the late 2000s is a good transition point.
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  #11490  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 1:03 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
For those of us who were born in the middle part of the twentieth century, this could be a source of great confusion.

To us, talk about "the thirties" conjures up images of the dustbowl and the great depression. In a few decades the "thirties" may be considered emblematic of massive coastal flooding and the extinction of the polar bear population in the Arctic.

The question will be "which thirties are you talking about"?????
Quite a few of the people born in the middle of the 20th century will.. err.. quite likely not be around during the "thirties" and "forties".
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  #11491  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 1:05 AM
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Originally Posted by CityTech View Post
Quite a few of the people born in the middle of the 20th century will.. err.. quite likely not be around during the "thirties" and "forties".
I plan to be.
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  #11492  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 1:55 AM
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  #11493  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 4:33 AM
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How in the **** is there only 500k in newfoundland?
Why we always talk about them so much?
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  #11494  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 4:53 AM
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Originally Posted by mintzilla View Post
How in the **** is there only 500k in newfoundland?
Why we always talk about them so much?
NL has been hovering between 500 000 and 570 000 since the 60s man.
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  #11495  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 7:37 AM
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Originally Posted by mintzilla View Post
How in the **** is there only 500k in newfoundland?
Why we always talk about them so much?
Because Newfoundlanders like to talk
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  #11496  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 8:09 PM
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Originally Posted by mintzilla View Post
How in the **** is there only 500k in newfoundland?
Why we always talk about them so much?
Because Newfoundland is on a pretty rough population decline right now and it'll only really get worse.

And we talk about them because they're a fun, energetic, usually-drinking outlier in the Canadian sphere of things.
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  #11497  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 8:12 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Yeah, of course, because that's not the same thing. When we say "the 1980s" we mean "the bunch of years of the 198x format", not "the years slotting between completed 1980th year since the calendar began, and completed 1990th year since the calendar began".

1980 was the first year of the 1980s.
2000 was the first year of the 2000s (as well as the last year of the 20th century, and the last year of the second millennium.)
1000 was the first year of the 1000s.
2001 was the first year of the third millennium.

Maybe I'm just so used to these concepts that they come naturally, but I don't see anything hard to grasp or contradictory in there.
How I see things too.

The two concepts can co-exist in my brain without difficulty.
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  #11498  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 9:39 PM
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For some reason I thought BC and Alberta were fairly close in population, but looking at that chart it appears there is still a nearly 700,000 difference in population. It's difficult to forecast the future economies of the provinces and price of oil, but I would be surprised if Alberta catches up to BC in population during my lifetime.
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  #11499  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 9:42 PM
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Originally Posted by CityTech View Post
I heard someone once use 1991 as this "cleavage point" so to speak, arguing that the "19th century" spanned from the French Revolution (1789) to World War I (1914-1918), and the "20th century" spanned from World War I to the Fall of Communism (1989-1991). To me this seems a little forced though; the 90s feels much more like an extension of the 20th century than the early stages of the 21st.

I think that the economic crisis of the late 2000s is a good transition point.
It's really far too early to make that distinction. I'm sure Britons in 1920 didn't expect that within their lifetime an even larger war would happen, the Empire would fall, atheism would rise, and brown people would move to the UK.

2008 could be viewed as a turning point, but we're basically repeating the same mistakes. 9/11 has massive foreign policy/surveillance implications, but has a fraction the impact of WW1 or the French Revolution.

Who knows what will happen in the next 20 years. We could see a war larger than WWII or the largest famine in world history. We could see the EU or US splinter. Or 2038 could be largely the same geopolitically, but with a much more powerful China and India.

I'm sure no one expected the fall of the Soviet Union/Yugoslavia and the integration of the EU in 1981, but all that happened within 20 years.
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  #11500  
Old Posted Nov 20, 2018, 12:30 AM
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Originally Posted by mintzilla View Post
How in the **** is there only 500k in newfoundland?
Why we always talk about them so much?
The other 2 million are scattered over the rest of the country.
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