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  #3021  
Old Posted May 15, 2018, 8:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wags_in_the_peg View Post
Mac's owner (Couche Tard) is rebranding all Mac's as Circle K
WHO YOU CALLIN A "couche tard"????
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  #3022  
Old Posted May 16, 2018, 12:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wags_in_the_peg View Post
Mac's owner (Couche Tard) is rebranding all Mac's as Circle K
The rebranding in Canada started about 1 year ago.
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  #3023  
Old Posted May 16, 2018, 12:28 AM
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Originally Posted by buzzg View Post
That seems odd – I thought 7-Eleven was taking over all the Esso convenience stores?
7-11 has bought out BC and Alberta locations. Alimentation Couche-Tard Inc (AKA MAC's) bought Ontario and Quebec. The news release I was looking at did not say who had bought out the Manitoba or Sask locations.

A few years ago a lot of the standalone Esso locations in Winnipeg were bought out by Pioneer Petroleum.

The C-store locations may be converting to unbranded ESSO gas retailers. Domo for years was selling Shell gas (as opposed to gas without the additional additives beyond the required govt ones). Same as Safeway with Shell before they rebranded into Shell stations.
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  #3024  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2018, 6:04 PM
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Depressing article in the CBC about the emerald ash borer:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manito...ipeg-1.4699623

Along with dutch elm, this is really going to change a lot of neighbourhoods. Here's a street in Ottawa in 2012:



And the exact same street four years later:

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  #3025  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 12:57 PM
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^yes, very bad news for Winnipeg. I’m curious how the city will decide which 1000 trees out of a possible 100,000 trees on public property will receive the treatment? That’s a drop in the bucket.
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  #3026  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 1:31 PM
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Honestly all this shows us, again, is that biodiversity is crucially important. We can’t beat nature. After Dutch Elm came, we didn’t say “hey lets start planting an array of species on the city” we said “hey let’s just switch to a different monoculture.”

Even many farmers are starting to grow multiple crops together (there’s precision machines that sort after harvest) because having biodiversity increases plants’ ability to fight pests and diseases.

Plus, it would look super nice having a mix of trees and shrubs on our bouldevards. The mix of species that were planted on John Hirsch is a good place to start.
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  #3027  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 5:53 PM
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^Couldn't agree more about biodiversity. You would think that we learned our lesson after DED, but the city went whole-hog into planting Green Ash over the past 30 or so years. Unfortunately, there are few tree species that are suitable for blvd plantings that can withstand our climate AND the rigors of salt and pollution. The city has actually gone back to planting a lot of Elm hybrids and cultivars that have DED resistance (not immunity, mind you), and some garden variety American Elms without resistance, because DED can be managed, but EAB cannot be.
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  #3028  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 6:17 PM
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This is a very interesting presentation on the topic:

http://www.jeffriesnurseries.com/eab_workshop17.pdf

They argue that for proper diversity we need 20 different tree genera, and there are only 18 available, and even fewer than that when you think about the challenges of urban trees.
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  #3029  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 6:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borkborkbork View Post
This is a very interesting presentation on the topic:

http://www.jeffriesnurseries.com/eab_workshop17.pdf

They argue that for proper diversity we need 20 different tree genera, and there are only 18 available, and even fewer than that when you think about the challenges of urban trees.
Though, couldn't this be mitigated by people planting a variety of trees on their own property? I assume it isn't enough diversity? I feel like peoples homes have a large variety of different trees on them.
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  #3030  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 6:34 PM
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Though, couldn't this be mitigated by people planting a variety of trees on their own property? I assume it isn't enough diversity? I feel like peoples homes have a large variety of different trees on them.
If I read the presentation right, the list of 18 *include* a bunch of trees that realistically will only be grown on private property (e.g. salt-sensitive, fruiting, small interfere with hydro lines, etc.) The list that make for suitable "boulevard trees" is much much smaller
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  #3031  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 6:35 PM
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^Great slideshow.
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  #3032  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 9:07 PM
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One of my friends had a large tree branch fall on her car last week and she found out that the city is almost 2000 trees behind on their tree trimming /removal program due to budget restrictions.
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  #3033  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 9:22 PM
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^ the lack of tree trimming is really unfortunate as IIRC, leaving dead branches on the elm trees just encourages DED to spread to an otherwise healthy tree.

It's a viscous cycle.

Delaying the trimming accelerates the spread of DED, which increases the number of trees that need to be cut down, which increases costs, reducing the money available for trimming, which accelerates the spread of DED, repeat.
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  #3034  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 9:29 PM
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I've lived in my current home for 8 years. The City had a contractor come by once a few years ago to trim. Other than that, I tend to the tree out front in the blvd to best of my abilities (even though it's illegal IIRC).

Someone mentioned previously it's a decade(s) long backlog because of funding. I don't climb up high, just trim the low sprouts. There is a dead branch up there for a couple years now. The trees didn't do so well this spring with the limited rain.
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  #3035  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 10:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borkborkbork View Post
This is a very interesting presentation on the topic:

http://www.jeffriesnurseries.com/eab_workshop17.pdf

They argue that for proper diversity we need 20 different tree genera, and there are only 18 available, and even fewer than that when you think about the challenges of urban trees.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmacc View Post
Though, couldn't this be mitigated by people planting a variety of trees on their own property? I assume it isn't enough diversity? I feel like peoples homes have a large variety of different trees on them.
Interesting read. Diversity on private property definitely helps, and yes we are limited in amount of tree species that will work. However, especially on boulevards where there's lots of room, we should also be planting shrubs, bushes, native grasses and plants around our trees. Having these numerous extra species around our trees helps make the trees stronger, and can accept and fight viruses that don't affect them as they do the trees.


Quote:
Originally Posted by drew View Post
^ the lack of tree trimming is really unfortunate as IIRC, leaving dead branches on the elm trees just encourages DED to spread to an otherwise healthy tree.

It's a viscous cycle.

Delaying the trimming accelerates the spread of DED, which increases the number of trees that need to be cut down, which increases costs, reducing the money available for trimming, which accelerates the spread of DED, repeat.
Tree/bush trimming is also a significant issue along sidewalks and AT paths here – the AT path that runs along the west side of the red through Fort Garry/Riverview is only half usable. Same with sidewalks on St. Mary's.
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  #3036  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2018, 6:13 AM
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Not sure if it's been mentioned in any other threads, but the city is looking at some aesthetic standards for downtown parking lots.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manito...lift-1.4713454

Not sure where I stand on this.

Does forcing new investments into parking lots reduce the chance that parking lots will be developed on?

Or does making parking lot ownership more expensive/less profitable mean that there's more chance of parking lots being developed on?
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  #3037  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2018, 2:07 PM
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Saw someone from the city treating one of the big trees in front of Amsterdam Tea/Bodegoes yesterday for EAB. Hammered like 20 little cylinders around the base of the tree, which has the "vaccine" in it. They're apparently focusing on mature trees in residential area, some in key public areas, all taking into account the likelihood of spreading, and general health of the trees in the area.
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  #3038  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2018, 4:12 AM
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These are great


@brent_bellamy
Apr 1
#WinnipegNow+Then: The intersection of Portage Avenue and Main Street.


@brent_bellamy
Mar 22
#WinnipegNow+Then: View down Portage Avenue. 1940’s and today.


@brent_bellamy
#WinnipegNow+Then: Portage and Main.
1940’s: Cars. Streetcars. Bikes. People.
2018: Cars. Busses. Barricades.


@brent_bellamy: #WinnipegNow+Then: MainStreet. Merchants Bank (right) lost for the Richardson Building, McKintyre Block (left) lost for a parking lot, streetcars lost for cars and busses.


@brent_bellamy
#WinnipegNow+Then: Aerial view comparison of the south side of downtown. Early 1960’s and today.


@brent_bellamy
#WinnipegNow+Then: The city’s industrial waterfront in 1963. Today being transformed @TheForks.


@brent_bellamy
#WinnipegNow+Then: @RRC Exchange District campus built in 2003, retained four historic facades. A pioneer of modern green building design.


@brent_bellamy: #WinnipegNow+Then: The view of downtown from St. Boniface in 1962 and today.


@brent_bellamy
#WinnipegNow+Then: Lindsay Building on Norte Dame - started the modern trend of transforming heritage buildings into residential.


@brent_bellamy
#WinnipegNow+Then: Leland Hotel, lost to arson in 1999. Replaced with @RRC Paterson Global Foods Institute in 2013.


Portage Avenue #WinnipegNow+Then comparison, showing the change in street life and sidewalk retail shops.


WinnipegNow+Then: Portage Avenue in the 1960’s and today. More buildings - Fewer people.


WinnipegNow+Then: Portage Avenue. (A stairwell kept me from getting further left) the two storey Curry Block replaced the Spencer Block and was intended to be the base of an 8 storey tower, but it was stopped because of World War One.


WinnipegNow+Then: Streetcar on Notre Dame Avenue. Today the tracks are exposed during a street renewal project.


WinnipegNow+Then: Provencher Boulevard with streetcar lines running down the centre median.


WinnipegNow+Then: Royal Alexandra Hotel at Main and Higgins. A grand CPR Hotel - The finest in the city. King George VI and Queen Elizabeth II both stayed there. Demolished in 1971.



WinnipegNow+Then: Graham Avenue before it became a surface parking lot.


WinnipegNow+Then: Victoria Theatre on Fort Street near Portage (beside the Vendome). There’s an urban legend that the current building might be the same one.



WinnipegNow+Then: Donald Street in the 1890’s and #WPGWhiteout


WinnipegNow+Then: Portage Avenue - Paris and Avenue Buildings from the 1950’s - almost all the same buildings, and all fully occupied, including 60 new residences, but which looks like it would create more pedestrian activity on the sidewalk?


WinnipegNow+Then: Gingerbread City Hall. Built in 1886. Replaced by the current structure in 1964.


WinnipegNow+Then: On an @NHLJets game day. Incredible that a 15,000 seat arena could be dwarfed by a department store. Eaton’s was the 10th largest department store in the world and at 700,000 square feet was 25% larger than 32 storey, 201 Portage, Winnipeg’s tallest building.


WinnipegNow+Then: Sherbrook Street at Portage Avenue.


WinnipegNow+Then: McKintyre Block at Portage+Main. Awnings to protect pedestrians, bikes propped up on the curbs. Today, lots of places to park a car.


WinnipegNow+Then: Royal Albert Hotel before the terrible glass addition. Soon to be home to the famous Alycia’s Restaurant.


WinnipegNow+Then: Bank of British North America (now Palomino Club). The oldest bank on Banker’s Row. Beside it, Dominion Bank at Main and McDermot. Demolished in 1966.


WinnipegNow+Then: Bank of Montreal under construction in 1913. Designed by McKim, Mead and White, the same architects as Penn Station and the interior of the White House.




WinnipegNow+Then: Corner of Donald and Graham. Gas station replaced by Millenium Library - part of the transition of the area from a downtown residential neighbourhood to large public buildings. (Tribune Building behind left)


WinnipegNow+Then: Albert Street. Showing value of small, old buildings. They create interesting streets & opportunity for small business.


WinnipegNow+Then: Loss of fine grained buildings & retail storefronts has hurt the economy & pedestrian quality of Main Street & downtown.


WinnipegNow+Then: @CBCManitoba building on Portage Avenue. TV broadcasting began from here in 1954, Canada's 4th television station.


WinnipegNow+Then Gray'sAuction @Ex_District_Wpg 2010. Today @kingandbann @chosabican @bronutswpg


WinnipegNow+Then: Construction of beautiful Église du Précieux Sang, St. Boniface in 1968. Is that architect Étienne Gaboury at the top?


WinnipegNow+Then: Main Street at McDermot looking towards Portage. Dominion Bank in the foreground. Merchant's Bank on the left.


WinnipegNow+Then: Gas station near Old Market Square - today @Bodegoes restaurant (slated for demo). Shows the amazing impact of trees.


WinnipegNow+Then: Osborne Village from the 1950's.


WinnipegNow+Then: Mitchell Copp Building on Portage Avenue. Now part of the @CentrepointWpg. Fire reduced its neighbour to one floor.


WinnipegNow+Then: The Tribune Buildings at Graham/Smith. Now a large surface parking lot.


WinnipegNow+Then: Demolition for Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre. National Historic Site and beautiful Brutalism.


WinnipegNow+Then: Main and Bannatyne. Ashdown Warehouse burned and rebuilt in 1904. Big4 Sales stuccoed in it 1959, re-bricked in 00's.


WinnipegNow+Then: Public Market then Public Safety Building. What will it be next? #MarketLands


WinnipegNow+Then: Royal Bank in 1909 by Carrère & Hastings (also designed New York Central Library-featured in 1st scene of Ghostbusters)


WinnipegNow+Then via @LBJBrewing -old buildings provide affordable opportunity for start-ups like this. Progress through preservation


WinnipegNow+Then: Dominion Bank on Main Street. Demolished because that's what they did in the late 60's.


WinnipegNow+Then: McDermot at Main Street.


WinnipegNow+Then: Main Street at Portage. A streetscape lost.


WinnipegNow+Then: Bannatyne Avenue. Siberian Elms planted in 1974. Looks like a good boulevard tree option. Seeds be damned


WinnipegNow+Then: City's first post office on Lombard, became Great West Life's first building.


WinnipegNow+Then: Main Street at William Stephenson Way.


WinnipegNow+Then: September 19, 1955 the streetcars stopped running...including the ones that ran on the median of Broadway.


WinnipegNow+Then: The evolution of Hargrave Street, from residential neighbourhood to office district.


WinnipegNow+Then: Before the Richardson Building, there was a cute little gas station at Portage+Main.


WinnipegNow+Then: La cathédrale Saint-Boniface before the devastating 1968 fire.


WinnipegNow+Then: Portage Avenue looking back to Main Street.


WinnipegNow+Then: The WWI soldier at Portage+Main protected by a concrete bunker.


WinnipegNow+Then: McDermot with a missing tooth. Middle building is now home to @Forth_Wpg


WinnipegNow+Then: Ashdown Warehouse. City's first loft condo. Amazing what a good cleaning can do


WinnipegNow+Then: 110 years of Main Street.


WinnipegNow+Then: Majestic Portage Avenue Post Office - replaced by the Dreman Building/Parkade in 1962.


#WinnipegNow+Then: Portage Avenue beside @uwinnipeg


WinnipegNow+Then - Portage Avenue entrance to the Capitol Theatre replaced by Dollarama.


WinnipegNow+Then - Block of small Main Street businesses demolished for Pantages Theatre addition and plaza in 1990


WinnipegNow+Then - The small retail storefronts (and corresponding pedestrian activity) gone from Main Street.


WinnipegNow+Then - When the Grain Exchange Building could be seen beyond the parking lot at Portage+Main. (1960's)


WinnipegNow+Then - first @greatwestlifeca building, before it grew. One of my favourite heritage buildings.


WinnipegNow+Then - 53 years of McDermot Avenue. Slow growth is sometimes a lucky thing.

Courtesy of: @brent_bellamy Twitter
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  #3039  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2018, 2:54 PM
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These are great


@brent_bellamy
Mar 22
#WinnipegNow+Then: View down Portage Avenue. 1940’s and today.

Courtesy of: @brent_bellamy Twitter
These are fantastic. And what a lot of work to put it together. One small quibble, the pic above can't be the 1940s because the streetcar tracks and boarding islands are already gone, replaced with left-turn lanes and grassy medians in alternating blocks. Must be post-1955.
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  #3040  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2018, 6:33 PM
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A lot of these pictures are so depressing :-(
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