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  #141  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2006, 8:41 PM
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Am Zirkus



Am Zirkus 1 is situated directly on the bank of the Spree river in Berlin-Mitte, not far from the Federal Ministries and the Chancellery.

Due to its centrality, it also enjoys excellent public transport connections.

Alongside 21.000 m² of office and business surface, approx.120 apartments are to be built on 9.000 m² in the nine storey building project.

On the basis of the various use and marketing possibilities, the building, equipped with an underground garage, divides into three individual parts from the ground floor. They are unified by a coarse metal structure into one building.

Master Plan:
Deutsche Immobilien AG
Architect:
Bothe Richter Teherani

Plan:


Model:


Aerial Photo with Model:
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  #142  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2006, 8:46 PM
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Monuments in Berlin:

Umspannwerk Wilhelmsruh


Kopenhagener Straße 83/89, Pankow; Phasenschieberhalle mit Wohntürmen (phase transformer building with residential towers), Messwarte (measuring station), Schalterhalle (breaker station) and Umformerstationen (transformer stations), 1925 by Hans Heinrich Müller for BEWAG

From 1925-32 Bewag, the municipal power provider of the city of Berlin, constructed a new, ultra-modern, area-wide AC-power supply network. This network included fourteen large transformer stations which transformed power current supplied by the main power stations to voltage for local distribution. The architect responsible for this construction program was Hans Heinrich Müller, according to whose designs more than forty power distribution stations emerged.

The transformer station at Wilhelmsruh was one of the first projects. Müller developed an exciting expressionistic architecture which was to characterize his later designs as well. He grouped individual structures strictly according to function as a symmetrical four-winged installation around the central control station. The remaining buildings are arranged according to the production process, with the phase transformer building on the street side, the transformers in both side wings and the breaker station at the rear. Without concealing its technical character, the power station is reminiscent of a castle of a knights' order, with its residential buildings surmounting the structure like corner towers, flanking staircase towers and mighty gate. The breaker station is the functional and artistic culmination of the station. The installations of the transformer station were centrally controlled and monitored for the duration of its service.
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  #143  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2006, 8:48 PM
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Monuments in Berlin:

Turbinenhalle


Turbinenhalle, Huttenstraße 12-16, Tiergarten; 1908-09 by Peter Behrens and Karl Bernhard, expansion 1939-40 by Jacob Schallenberger and P. Schmidt; administration building, around 1956 by AEG-Baubüro (AEG Construction Bureau)

A picture of the turbine building can be found in any good architectural manual. It is considered to be the beginning of modern industrial architecture in Germany. Beginning in 1908, AEG founder Emil Rathenau commissioned its construction to house the production of its ultra-modern turbines. Within a few short years, AEG had ascended from the inception of power supply to world-class status and was among the few companies at the forefront of technical development. This, too, was to be reflected in its entire image to the outside world. Rathenau was the first to apply the utmost in marketing strategies, commissioning the artist and self-taught architect Peter Behrens to design all electrical products for the company, such as electric arc lamps, fans and electric boilers, and, starting with the turbine building, also the architecture of all of the factories.

The turbine building consists entirely of steel, glass and concrete, the modern materials of industrial construction. Rather than hide the advanced technology and new kinds of production methods in the interior as was the former style, the outer shell instead was to follow from of these advancements and express them. The result is evident in the stern, clean lines and the renunciation of all ornamentation. But Behrens also rendered the building in the manner of a monumental temple in order to express the magnificence of production. He transformed simple materials into a dignified, powerful form. Although the bent gables of the frontal façade and side pylon consist of nothing more than a few centimeters of concrete over an iron framework, in combination with the glazing they have the effect of a refined, stately façade. By contrast, the area between the supports of the elongated façade is entirely of glass. The slight incline of the corner pylon and lateral inward glazing grant the structure a dynamic character in the context of the roof's projection and the precise sequence of the side supports.
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  #144  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2006, 8:49 PM
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Monuments in Berlin:

Siemenswerke


Siemenswerke
Nonnendammallee 72, Spandau; Dynamowerk-Hallenkomplex (generator plant complex), 1906 by Karl Janisch and Carl Dihlmann, 1909-12 expansion by Janisch, 1922 and 1940-42 expansion by Hertlein
Nonnendammallee 101, Spandau; Hauptverwaltungsgebäude (administrative center), 1910-13 by Karl Janisch and Friedrich Blume, 1922-30 expansion by Hans Hertlein
Schaltwerk-Hallenkomplex control center complex, 1916 by Karl Janisch, 1921-22 and 1926-28 expansion by Hans Hertlein
Nonnendammallee 104, Spandau; Schaltwerk-Hochhaus (high-rise control center), 1926-28 by Hans Hertlein;
Siemensdamm 50-54, Charlottenburg; Wernerwerk-Hochhaus (industrial high-rise), 1929-30 by Hans Hertlein
Siemensdamm 62, Charlottenburg; Wernerwerk XV (industrial structure), 1924-25 and later expansion by Hans Hertlein

Industrialization brought forth large-scale corporations at the end of the nineteenth century, causing an explosion in the scope of historical city growth. New districts with names such as Borsigwalde, Spindlersfeld or Siemenstadt sprang up around the factories of enterprises as these migrated out to the undeveloped areas outside the city. Located between Charlottenburg and Spandau, Siemensstadt is an example of this development in Berlin. The center of the district is not constituted by the church and the city hall as is customary, but rather by the administrative centers of large concerns. Larger than the city hall of any Berlin district, such locations for the first time documented the international standing of these corporations. The Siemens architect Karl Janisch set the administrative structure against a cathedral of engineering in the impressive Dynamowerk. The head of the enterprise, its strategic center, was integrated into a unified complex with its technical heart, the large-scale assembly structure for the Dynamo generator invented by Werner von Siemens. The next forty years of company architecture were defined by the architect Hans Hertlein, who created the "Siemens style" with his unique industrial architecture. Among his most important structures in Siemensstadt are the storage building begun in 1916 and expanded in several construction phases until 1928 and the ten-story disk of the control center on Nonnendammallee built from 1926-28; along with the Wernerwerk industrial high-rise on Siemensdamm, erected in two construction phases from 1928-30 and 1936/37 and the prominent five to ten-story, triple-angled buildings of the Wernerwerk XV on Siemensdamm, erected in four construction phases from 1924 to 1941.

While the red clinker façades of his first high-rise steel-frame construction were still pillar structures accentuated by immense, protruding staircase towers and graduated upper stories, beginning in the 1930's Hertlein designed smooth cubical buildings, offering a moving silhouette of interlocked wing structures of different heights and looming staircase towers.
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  #145  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2006, 8:50 PM
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Monuments in Berlin:

Kraftwerk Klingenberg


Kraftwerk Klingenberg (Klingenberg Power-station)
Köpenicker Chaussee 42-45, Lichtenberg; 1925-26 by Waltar Klingenberg and Werner Issel

The Kraftwerk Klingenberg was Germany's most important new power plant structure of the 1920's. A technological marvel planned by the pioneer of modern power plant construction, Georg Klingenberg, it became the example of a new generation of large-scale power plants far beyond Germany's borders.

In 1927 it was integrated into the power grid with an output of 270,000 KW, making it the largest, most modern power plant in Europe. The entire plant was organized in exemplary fashion. Coal was delivered via canal and rail connections built especially for the plant, transported by mechanical conveyors to the coal mill where it is broken, dried, and milled, and the coal dust blown into the furnaces of the two boiler houses. Connected engine rooms and control stations produced the power, which then was fed into the power network. The architects Waltar Klingenberg and Werner Issel created a design of extraordinary quality for the industrial complex situated on both sides of the Köpenicker Chaussee between railway terrain and the river Spree. Functional contours are brought to life by the effects of the materials: red clinker facing, varying masonry techniques and expressive details. The main accent is set by a severe, vertically sectioned 11-story high-rise administration building with ornamental clinker facing and a setback roof. On the opposite, southern side of the street is the elongated control station rhythmically enhanced by eight staircase towers. The complex on both sides of the street is connected by a bridge structure serving as a cable route and personnel walkway.
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  #146  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2006, 8:51 PM
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Monuments in Berlin:

AEG Oberschöneweide


AEG Oberschöneweide
Wilhelminenhofstraße 76-78, Köpenick; Kraftwerk und Kabelwerk Oberspree (power station and cable factory), begun in 1897 by Paul Tropp et.al.
09020121
Wilhelminenhofstraße 83-85, Köpenick; Deutsche Niles-Werkzeugmaschinen-Fabrik (machine-tool factory) (AEG-TRO), 1899 by Paul Tropp, around 1915, 1928 by Ernst Ziesel and around 1940
09020161
Ostendstraße 1-4, Köpenick; Nationale Automobil-Gesellschaft, Industrieanlage (industrial complex), Hochbauten und Doppelhalle (high-rise structures and duplex), 1913-17 by Peter Behrens

By 1895, AEG had already begun constructing a long string of industrial installations in the southeast of Berlin, far on the outskirts of the city between the Upper Spree and what is today Wilhelminenhofstrasse. The district of Köpenick is characterized by their yellow brick façades to this day.

From 1895-96, AEG constructed the first three-phase electrical power plant in Germany. Important stages in power engineering innovations were initiated in this plant, which was expanded and modernized several times before its closure in 1910.

The older section of the Kabelwerk Oberspree was developed from 1897-1900 on Wilhelminenhofstrasse, and consisted of a five-bay industrial block and several multi-story structures. An automobile manufacturing plant was constructed between 1903 and 1905. The earlier principle of lining up independent, closed structures was abandoned when assembly line production was introduced; industrial halls and multi-story structures were built from 1915 to 1930. Three decades of industrial architecture are collected on the grounds of the cable works complex, erected by renowned AEG architects such as Paul Tropp, Johannes Kraatz, Klemm, Peter Behrens and Ernst Ziesel. This is particularly apparent in the triple-bay workshop building constructed by Klemm in 1899-1900 and then expanded by Ernst Ziesel and Gerhard Mensch to accommodate two new bay structures for the copper rolling-mill in 1928.

The plant constructed for the Deutsche-Niles-Werkzeug-Maschinen-Fabrik starting in 1899 on Wilhelminenstrasse is characterized by the large assembly structure on the street side built from 1915-16. Peter Behrens' example is apparent in the structure's form and in the segmentation of its façade. On the same lot, Ernst Ziesel erected the cube of the large AEG transformer building in the form of a triple-hinged steel frame structure on Edisonstrasse in 1928. This building was constructed for AEG, which took over the plant in 1920.

The imposing block of buildings of the automobile manufacturing plant, constructed by Peter Behrens from 1915 to 1917 for the AEG-owned Nationale Automobil Gesellschaft (NAG), rises above Ostendstrasse. Five-story wings for offices and the factory, capped with a prominent high tower on the corner of Wilhelminenhofstrasse, form a horseshoe around a double-bay assembly structure.
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  #147  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2006, 8:52 PM
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Monuments in Berlin:

AEG am Humboldthain


AEG am Humboldthain
Brunnenstraße 111, Wedding; 1896-97 by Franz Schwechten; Alte Fabrik für Bahnmaterial (Old factory for railway materials), 1906-07 by Johannes Kraaz, conversion 1911 by Peter Behrens; Hochspannungsfabrik (High voltage factory), Kleinmotorenfabrik (Small motor factory), Montagehalle für Großmaschinen (Large machine assembly), Neue Fabrik für Bahnmaterial und Tor 4 (New factory for railway materials and gate 4), 1909-12 by Peter Behrens and Karl Bernhard; Erweiterung Montagehalle assembly (Hall expansion),1928 by Ernst Ziesel

The electrical industry was second only to mechanical engineering in its influence on the character of Berlin's industrial development. Beginning in 1890, technical progress in Germany was propelled forward mainly by electrical industry enterprises located in Berlin like AEG, Siemens and OSRAM, which ultimately operated worldwide. Berlin's reputation as "electropolis" was owed primarily to Siemens and AEG. Starting in 1895, within a few years time AEG erected the enormous complex on Brunnenstrasse, representing tremendous production potential by the standards of the day. The Gothic-style Beamtentor ("Officers' Gate") designed by Franz Schwechten in 1896 stands as a reminder of the older, long since dismantled factories. Much in evidence in the factories constructed from 1907 onward is the signature of Peter Behrens, who developed modern architecture and product design as artistic advisor to AEG beginning in that year. The industrial buildings constructed for AEG in the following years according to his design were innovative models with considerable influence on the development of modern industrial architecture.

The Hochspannungsfabrik, constructed of steel framework according to his design, was erected on the western factory site from 1909-10. Composed of a double-bay industrial hall flanked by two multi-story buildings connected by means of an office wing, the compact manufacturing plant displays an austere brick architecture of continuous pillars and large windows accentuated by immense staircase towers. The southwestern view of the hall's façade flanked by staircases, styled to resemble the front of a temple, is one of monumental dignity.

The elongated structure of the Kleinmotorenfabrik (1910-12) dominates Voltastrasse with its long façade. design of robust semi-rounded pillars. Here Behrens raised the pillar façade so frequently used in Berlin's architecture of the period into the monumental. In the Neue Fabrik für Bahnmaterial constructed in 1911-1912 on the lot to the west, Behrens dispensed with a design differentiating between a simple courtyard and a monumental façade; here, both courtyard and façade are constructed of flat pillars framing large windows. This sweeping renunciation of sturdy structuring elements is also characterized by the triple-hinged girder construction (Karl Bernhard) of the Montagehalle für Großmaschinen built in 1911-12 on Hussitenstrasse. With his nearly flush arrangement of bricks, glass and the end surfaces of the steel supports, Behrens introduced a development which was later adopted by the stereometric architecture of New Realism in the 1920s.
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  #148  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2006, 8:54 PM
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Monuments in Berlin:

Hochbahn


Hochbahn
Bülowstraße, Overhead railway installation between the Kreuzberg district boundary and Nollendorfplatz including entry ramp, 1899-1902 by Heinrich Schwieger, Alfred Grenander, Bruno Möhring, Cremer & Wolffenstein
Oberbaumbrücke 1892-96 by Otto Stahn

The standard railway system built by Siemens & Halske in 1896 and 1902 (presently line U1/U2) was Germany's first electrical overhead and underground railway system and is considered to be a master achievement in technical engineering. Linked to transfer stations of the city commuter railway, the rail line from East Berlin through the southern belt was built during the period of imperial consolidation via the Potsdam and Anhalter railway terrain to Charlottenburg. The Hochbahnviadukt (elevated train viaduct) and overhead railway stations were planned by Heinrich Schwieger and Johannes Bousset as transparent constructions of iron framework and austere engineering, and its easterly section was executed accordingly. The western stretch of the viaduct route and its railway stations, however, were built in a considerably more stately design. In accordance with a planning change in 1899, the line beginning at Nollendorfplatz station was constructed as an underground railway. Alfred Grenander developed design principles for underground stations of the standard railway which remained obligatory for Berlin's U-Bahn constructions for many decades.

In addition to station types (Warschauerstrasse, Görlitzer Bahnhof and Prinzenstrasse), the present standard railway is characterized to a great extent by Bruno Möhring's "artistically detailed" overhead railway stations at Bülowstrasse, Kottbusser Tor and Hallesches Tor, the latter of which were later reconstructed and renovated by Alfred Grenander. The Oberbaumbrücke, constructed from1894-96 according to plans by Otto Stahn, serves as the Spree crossing to the terminal station at Warschauer Strasse. Reconstructed from 1992-95, it symbolizes the integration of the once divided city.
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  #149  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2006, 9:05 PM
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Office Location Berlin - Forecast 2000-2010 Office space demand

A gross assimilation of 4.5 million m² of office space is expected. The number of office workers is also expected to increase by approximately 90,000 by 2010.

The demand for office space will focus on inner city locations (57%) - primarily in Berlin-Mitte and The "City-West". Global Players and New Economy sectors will gain importance.





Market demand by 2010 is estimated as follows:
Global Player:
0,6 Mio. qm
Business Community:
1,7 Mio. qm
New Economy:
0,6 Mio. qm
Local Dinosaurs:
0,6 Mio. qm
City Services:
1,0 Mio. qm

Global Players prefer central locations, e.g. Alexanderplatz and Ostbahnhof and, in the long term, sites in the surroundings of the new international airport in Berlin-Brandenburg. Global Players who require large office space favour "landmark buildings". Companies in this category are especially interesting for high-rise projects. However, at least half of the interested Global Players look for medium-sized properties up to 7,000 m2. In these cases, business sites with a favourable infrastructure and low rents are just as important as central locations. Such locations are usually preferred by companies active in sales, services, and R & D.

Companies in the New Economy category prefer locations and buildings that are laid out in small sections. They also like buildings with a more traditional character with a potential for development, and a specific image. However, as these companies grow and mature efficiently structured properties (over 1,000 m2) will gain importance over existing smaller buildings located in mixed-use urban areas.

In the Business Community sector the demand either focuses on prestigious downtown locations, or on inexpensive (periphery) business locations in commercial parks, new development areas, or along radial roads.

Companies in the City Service category are widely spread across the city. Attorneys and insurance companies prefer central locations. Health insurance companies and medical centres require locations in the district centres. Similar to New Economy companies, City Services will be a driving force behind services available in the mixed-use urban districts. These activities will continue to cluster in the centres of Berlin's city districts.

Local Dinosaurs favour reasonably priced locations for large scale operational units. Since many of these organisations provide public services, political influence on location choice will be likely.
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  #150  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2006, 9:17 PM
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New hotel right next to the Zoologischer Garten train station , "Motel One"

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  #151  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2006, 4:48 AM
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Great job keeping us updated!

And yes, some of us do occasionally browse this thread.
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  #152  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2006, 4:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTiger
I'm sure that the government won't allow it to destroy the airport building.
I remember that there were plans to keep the area for a future Olympic Games develpoment.



OMG do those airport runways really go so close to those residential areas???

Or is this maybe an airport for smaller planes???
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  #153  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2006, 6:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grumpy
Monuments in Berlin:

Hochbahn


Hochbahn
Bülowstraße, Overhead railway installation between the Kreuzberg district boundary and Nollendorfplatz including entry ramp, 1899-1902 by Heinrich Schwieger, Alfred Grenander, Bruno Möhring, Cremer & Wolffenstein
Oberbaumbrücke 1892-96 by Otto Stahn

The standard railway system built by Siemens & Halske in 1896 and 1902 (presently line U1/U2) was Germany's first electrical overhead and underground railway system and is considered to be a master achievement in technical engineering. Linked to transfer stations of the city commuter railway, the rail line from East Berlin through the southern belt was built during the period of imperial consolidation via the Potsdam and Anhalter railway terrain to Charlottenburg. The Hochbahnviadukt (elevated train viaduct) and overhead railway stations were planned by Heinrich Schwieger and Johannes Bousset as transparent constructions of iron framework and austere engineering, and its easterly section was executed accordingly. The western stretch of the viaduct route and its railway stations, however, were built in a considerably more stately design. In accordance with a planning change in 1899, the line beginning at Nollendorfplatz station was constructed as an underground railway. Alfred Grenander developed design principles for underground stations of the standard railway which remained obligatory for Berlin's U-Bahn constructions for many decades.

In addition to station types (Warschauerstrasse, Görlitzer Bahnhof and Prinzenstrasse), the present standard railway is characterized to a great extent by Bruno Möhring's "artistically detailed" overhead railway stations at Bülowstrasse, Kottbusser Tor and Hallesches Tor, the latter of which were later reconstructed and renovated by Alfred Grenander. The Oberbaumbrücke, constructed from1894-96 according to plans by Otto Stahn, serves as the Spree crossing to the terminal station at Warschauer Strasse. Reconstructed from 1992-95, it symbolizes the integration of the once divided city.
Although I love the Hochbahn in Berlin as it is today, it's a far cry from the ornate structures that existed before WWII. These have sadly been replaced with more standard iron supports. The original ones were ornate with splended details.

There was a great thread at SSC a while back that showed Berlin "then" and "now" and you could see how much nicer they were. Pity they still don't have a search facility on that forum.
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  #154  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2006, 10:02 PM
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Sad news : the Tempelhof airport is going to be shut down

Official text in German:

Der Flugbetrieb auf dem Flughafen Tempelhof soll 2007 beendet werden. Damit fällt eine Fläche in das Berliner Stadtgebiet zurück, die mit ca. 386 ha größer ist als der gesamte Berliner Tiergarten. Ein gewaltiges Flächenpotential, das integriert, verwaltet und entwickelt werden muss.
Das Konzept zur Nachnutzung des Flughafens Tempelhof ist bereits seit den 90er Jahren diskutiert und publiziert worden und steht in seinen Grundzügen fest:
die innere Fläche des Flughafengeländes bildet eine Grünanlage, das “Wiesenmeer”, das durch einen ringförmigen Boulevard begrenzt wird. In den Randzonen schließen sich Baufelder für unterschiedliche Nutzungen – Wohnen, Büros, Gewerbe, Dienstleistungen, Sporteinrichtungen
etc. – an. Durch die Größe der Fläche kann das Gelände nicht kurzfristig entwickelt werden. Angesichts
der Berliner Immobilienmarktsituation sind mittelfristig nur begrenzte Aufnahmekapazitäten zu erwarten.
Vor diesem Hintergrund soll die Standortkonferenz das Nachnutzungskonzept in Erinnerung rufen und Erfahrungen, die mit anderen Flughafenumnutzungen gemacht worden sind, zur Diskussion stellen.

some ideas of the develoment of the airport on pdf:
http://www.stadtentwicklung.berlin.d..._III_Teil2.pdf
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  #155  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2006, 11:36 PM
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So, are there any updates about Alexanderplatz? What's going on there?
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  #156  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2006, 8:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roseville
So, are there any updates about Alexanderplatz? What's going on there?
I guess this shall remain a rendering for ever

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  #157  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2006, 8:39 PM
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Time for spotlights on actual buildings & contructions:

TV Tower
The TV Tower next to Alexanderplatz has become a symbol of the city of Berlin. Designed by Hermann Henselmann and built between 1965 and 1969, the tower is 368 metres tall and houses a revolving café, telecommunication installations and a viewing platform. On a clear day the view extends 40 kilometers in all directons.

The seven-storey sphere weighs 4,800 tons and rests on the concrete shaft at a height of 200 meters. The individual sections were pre-assembled on the ground, then fixed with tie bars and fitted together at the top of the shaft.

From 1993 to 1998 the tower underwent refurbishment in several stages, in the course of which a new antenna increased the height from 365 to 368 meters.

The actual tower entrance is situated on the first floor of a hexagonal hall at the base of the tower. The ground floor includes a souvenir shop.

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  #158  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2006, 8:41 PM
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Berlin Cathedral

In 1747, Frederick II had architect Johann Boumann the Older build a cathedral next to the Lustgarten, replacing an older version situated south of the royal palace and dating back to 1536. In 1817 Schinkel redesigned Boumann's building. It was demolished in 1893.

Today's monumental structure was erected between 1894 and 1905 to plans by Julius Raschdorff and his son, Otto. This outstanding example of religious architecture in the latter part of the 19th century contains elements of Roman baroque and Italian high renaissance.

The cathedral was badly damaged in the Second World War. However, while the adjacent royal palace was demolished for ideological reasons, the cathedral ruins were left untouched. The church authorities in the GDR even managed to begin restoration work on this vast building in 1974. With financial help from the Protestant Church in the Federal Republic of Germany, a somewhat simplified restoration of the exterior was completed in 1981.

The interior with its eight ceiling mosaics, the imperial staircase, and the crypt were restored between 1984 and 2002. About 100 coffins found in the crypt have been on display since 1999 - including those designed by Peter Vischer in 1530, and the magnificent coffin for Frederick I designed by Andreas Schlüter. Since the early 1990s, services and concerts have once again taken place in the cathedral.



official link : http://www.berliner-dom.de/startNet.htm
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  #159  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2006, 8:42 PM
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Bundestag Office Building Unter den Linden 50

The former GDR Ministry of Foreign Trade building was converted by architect Alexander Kolbe into an office block for members of the Bundestag, the Lower House of the German Parliament.

The building, which measures 100 by 100 metres, includes 450 offices, 19 board rooms and four shops, and takes up an entire block.

Its external appearance has changed radically in recent years. The front of the building has been faced with Roman travertine, whose yellowish-brown hue harmonises with the tone of the Embassy of the Russian Federation across the street.

The interior courtyard designed by Klaus Rinke contains a birch tree grove and the vast "Sunbeam" sculpture that marginally exceeds the height of the building itself.

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  #160  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2006, 8:44 PM
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Alexanderplatz station


Alexanderplatz station became a hive of activity when streetcar and subway lines were connected to the station in 1913. It was erected to plans by architect Johann Eduard Jacobsthal between 1878 and 1882 immediately after the rail tracks were constructed over the 'Königsgraben', a former drainage channel.

A riveted steel arch structure, 20 metres high, spans the suburban railway tracks that were electrified in 1928. The suburban rail, three subway lines, and several tram and bus lines met at Alexanderplatz. Since 1930, underground passages have lead directly to subway platforms.

In 1964, architects Hans-Joachim May and Günther Anrich added high glass walls to complete the station hall. A pedestrian arcade extending throughout the interior of the building was introduced around the same time.

To cater for the changes prompted by the reunification of the city, Deutsche Bahn AG modernized the station from 1995 to 1998. Architects Rebecca Chestnut and Robert Niess were responsible for the new design. Previously walled-up arcades were re-opened, fitted with glass partitions, and given an old-style clinker brick facing.

The railway service facilities operated by Deutsche Bahn AG are supplemented on the ground and lower floors by some 50 shops, cafés and restaurants. A circular stairway now connects the ground floor with the subway level. After refurbishment, suburban, local and regional trains began once again to stop at Alexanderplatz.

pictures from 1900 to 2001:

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