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  #2961  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2011, 1:09 PM
Los Angeles Past Los Angeles Past is offline
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Woodbury College History?


My personal photo collection.



My mother attended Los Angeles's famed business school Woodbury College from 1934-1936. When I was growing up, she always used to point to the campus at 1027 Wilshire Boulevard (above) as the place she went to school, but I now know that building didn't open until 1937, the year after she graduated. So I'm now wondering – where was Woodbury actually located when my mom went there? Unfortunately, she's no longer around for me to ask...

Thanks to anyone who can help!

-Scott

Last edited by Los Angeles Past; Jun 12, 2012 at 10:09 PM.
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  #2962  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2011, 1:29 PM
Sebisebster Sebisebster is offline
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I guess I found what I was looking for on Pershing Square.
Look at this pic:

West 6th st, corner of South Olive...



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The lower building, at the left of the image... The Wilson's Dancing Studio!!!

This is place where now stands the City National Bank Building... Am I right?
When the Wilson's Dancing Studio was demolished? In the early 60's?
At the end of this decade, The CNB Building, along with One Wilshire were constructed, and both were the first modern office towers in the city...

After that... I would like to know what buildings were in the place where the Internacional Jewelry Center stands today, Hill st, corner of 6th...



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According to the pics I saw in this thread... Was it the Paramount Building?
Any Cafeterias or Theaters?
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  #2963  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2011, 7:15 PM
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GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Los Angeles Past View Post




My mother attended Los Angeles's famed business school Woodbury College from 1934-1936. When I was growing up, she always used to point to the campus at 1027 Wilshire Boulevard (above) as the place she went to school, but I now know that building didn't open until 1937, the year after she graduated. So I'm now wondering – where was Woodbury actually located when my mom went there? Unfortunately, she's no longer around for me to ask...

Thanks to anyone who can help!

-Scott

Scott-- It seems that Woodbury had a number of downtown locations--beginning with one near the Plaza, according to this:
http://my.woodbury.edu/SiteDirectory...Presidents.pdf

Per www.woodbury.edu, the college was at 727 S. Figueroa from 1924 to 1937, so that must be the campus your mother attended. On the 1931 downtown map we've seen here, a "Woodbury Building" is indicated at the SW corner of Fig & 7th, but I haven't seen any pics of it yet. Other addresses for Woodbury in city directories are the Hamburger Bldg., 320 W. 8th (1909) and the Union Bank Bldg., 325 W. 8th (1915 & 1923).

Per city directories, and the pics below, Woodbury was at one time on the west side of Spring between 2nd and 3rd, some time before 1909:

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assets...CHS-12626?v=hr



http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assets.../CHS-2858?v=hr


Some interesting shots of the new campus on Wilshire:


LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics23/00061267.jpg


USC Digital Library http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assets...W-6-110-1-ISLA

LAPL http://jpg1.lapl.org/00089/00089959.jpg
New name; photo dated by LAPL as 1978

Last edited by GaylordWilshire; Feb 24, 2011 at 10:02 PM.
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  #2964  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2011, 10:25 PM
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Great detective work GaylordWilshire.

The Woodbury College Building on Wilshire was a thing of beauty


_______________


Here are a couple interesting photos of Broadway


Looking north on Broadway from 5th Street in 1907.

The photo could possibly be from 4th Street. The second photo I posted below was labeled "north on Broadway from 4th Street"
and yet the second photo was taken on the same block (albeit the middle of the block)


Notice the odd shape on top of the large building down the block. Can you tell what it is?



usc digital archive






below: Here is the same view from mid-block.




usc digital archive


It's a GIANT woman's shoe!!



Another interesting detail is the banner across the street. The banner reads "VOTE FOR OWENS RIVER JUNE 12"
(it's hard to read the banner in the photo, but it was mentioned in the description of the photo at USC Archive)

This must be the vote on whether or not to issue BONDS for the Los Angeles Aqueduct!



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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Feb 25, 2011 at 1:39 AM.
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  #2965  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2011, 11:31 PM
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Woodbury College on Figueroa...sort of

Photos of Woodbury at 727 S. Figueroa are elusive, which is odd given that it was there for 13 years.
About all I can find are what might have once been its roof or roofs, years after it left for 1027 Wilshire.
LAPL http://jpg1.lapl.org/00089/00089085.jpg

LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics44/00071904.jpg

And then it vanished.
LAPL http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics26/00032561.jpg
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  #2966  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2011, 2:07 AM
KevinW KevinW is offline
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Pershing Square over the years

Here's a nice overview of the Square:

Pershing Square
Historic Background

The text below is excerpted from a 1993 brochure by the Los Angeles Conservancy entitled "Pershing Square Landmarks: A walking tour sponsored by the Los Angeles Conservancy." 1986, revised 1993. The original text was written by Steve Fader, and the publication of the brochure was made possible by a grant from the Community Redevelopment Agency. Do not reproduce information from this site without acknowledgement of the authors of the original document, or of the authors of this site.

For years the square was a dusty vacant parcel known as block number 15 in Ord's Survey of Los Angeles. However, in 1866, an ordinance was signed by Mayor Aguillar declaring the block "...a public square for the use and benefit of the citizens of the common." The square was designed as a formal Spanish plaza and became known as La Plaza Abaja.



By 1887 the area around the square was becoming residential, and the new residents referred to the square as Los Angeles Park. Cypress and citrus trees were planted and a white picket fence was constructed to discourage stray livestock from entering the park.





Here's a view down Olive:



In the early 1890's, the park was renamed Central Park. It was redesigned by Fred Eaton, then a City Engineer and later Mayor. A serpentine promenade, wooden benches, new plantings, sidewalks, and a bandstand were provided.



In 1911 the park was again redesigned, this time by the noted architect John Parkinson. The design was formal and symmetrical, with European antecedents. There were classic walkways within the square, a beautiful central fountain, lush plantings, and ornamental corner balustrades. The perimeter walkways around the park, which has been an important component of the Central Park in the early 1900's were maintained by Parkinson.




The view East on Hill in 1913:



In 1918, "in a fit of Armistice Day fever," Central Park's name was changed to Pershing Square, and a statue of a dough boy was added to the corner of the park.

Here's looking up Hill in 1920:



One of the last shots of St. Paul's Episcopal Church before it was replaced by the Biltmore. I wonder what the cranes in the background are for?



Most of the buildings on or near the square were built in the 1920's and early 1930'sÉ.During this period the Square was widely known for its colorful orators, military posts, and newsstands. Even the public library set up shop here.

The Biltmore, shortly after being built:



Birdseye view of Pershing Square looking southeast from the corner of 5th Street and Olive Street, Los Angeles, ca.1926



View of Pershing Square looking west on Hill Street and 6th Street, Los Angeles, ca.1926



Tropical plantings were added to the park in 1928 by Frank Shearer, the Park Superintendent.



As early as 1928, there were suggestions to put a parking facility under Pershing Square. The intended purpose was to alleviate congestion downtown, and later, to revive the ailing Broadway Theater District.

The Title Guarantee and Trust building, which still stands, was built in 1930:



In 1938, the Philharmonic Auditorium got a Deco makeover:



In 1950-51, after two decades of pressure, the City permitted construction of an 1800-car garage under Pershing Square. The park became a roof of grass. Automobile ramps on each side cut off the park from the surrounding city, making the square into an island, difficult to approach.





[In 1994] world-renown architect Ricardo Legoretta and equally celebrated landscape architect Laurie Olin have designed the square to be a vibrant gathering place and a signature public area for downtown Los Angeles.

The redesign was financed in part through the Pershing Square Property Owners Association together with a matching grant of funds from the Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles.

The following are landmark buildings around Pershing Square:

* Subway Terminal Building, 417 S. Hill, 1925, Schulz and Weaver. Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #177. Another view of the building.

When the Subway Terminal Building was built, the Los Angeles basin was serviced by over 1000 miles of Pacific Electric inter-urban railway lines. The Terminal Building was constructed over the underground portal of lines to the San Fernando Valley and the Westside. The original grand concourse was severely damaged by an office renovation in the 1950s.

The Terminal building itself is one of the few Los Angeles office blocks from the 1920's to have a granite exterior. Its design derives from a 15th century Florentine palazzo.

* Title Guarantee and Trust Building, 401 W. 5th St, 1930, Parkinson and Parkinson. Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #278; listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

This is an Art Deco building with Gothic elements. The lobby has murals by Hugo Ballin celebrating the Treaty of Cahuenga and the La Brea Tar Pits.

* Oviatt Building, 617 S. Olive St, 1927-28, Walker and Eisen. Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #195. Panorama of Olive and 6th Street, 1912, before the Oviatt.

Combining Romanesque and Art Deco design, the 13-story Oviatt Building is one of Los Angeles' most celebrated landmarks. Built by James Oviatt, it housed Alexander and Oviatt Men's store and a luxurious 2-story, 10-room penthouse apartment for Mr. Oviatt.

Oviatt, captivated by the new Art Deco style, which he had seen in Paris, commissioned Rene Lalique to design and fabricate all the decorative glass. Most of the Lalique glass filling the ceiling of the marquee lobby has been removed.

Extensive renovation and restoration of the Oviatt Building was undertaken by Los Angeles developer Ratkovitch and Bowers and architect Brenda Levin in 1976.

* Heron Building, 510 W. 6th St., 1920-21, Dodd and Richards.

The Heron Building is a 13-story Renaissance Revival building.

* Pacific Mutual Building, now known as the Pacific Center, 523 W. 6th St. Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #398.

Original building, 1908, Parkinson and Bergstrom
North Side addition, 1916, William J. Dodd
West Side addition, 1929, Parkinson and Parkinson
Moderne remodeling, 1936, Parkinson and Parkinson
Twelve-story structure, 1921, Dodd and Richards
Garage Building, 1926, Schultze and Weaver.

The Pacific Mutual building is actually three interconnected buildings built between 1908 and 1929. The building was renovated by Westgroup, Inc. in 1985.

* Biltmore Hotel, 515 S. Olive St., 1923, Schultze and Weaver. Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #60.

When opened in 1923, [the Biltmore] was the largest hotel west of Chicago, with 916 rooms. Many of the luxurious interior banquet rooms of the Biltmore were decorated by Giovanni Smeraldi, an Italian muralist. [The Biltmore's] exterior is classic Renaissance Revival.

The Biltmore has undergone two major renovations. In the mid-'70s, Phyllis Lambert and Gene Summers reversed years of decay with renovation that received a National Trust Honor Award in 1981. Westgroup, Inc bought the hotel in 1984 and did extensive renovation, as well as adding an office tower.

Compiled by Ruth Wallach, USC libraries. 10/1999.

So here are four early photos of Pershing square looking south. The first was taken around 1880, it's amazing how little was in L.A. at the time.



The next was taken just eight years later in 1888. The church at the future site of the biltmore, which was built in 1923 is now visible as are three or four other churches. I'm always amazed at the number of houses of worship in old American cities.



And now in 1909 the city was really starting to sprout up behind it.



Then just four years later in 1913.




And here's a little history about the garage underneath:

http://blogdowntown.com/2010/01/5047...re-garage-idea

and here's a nice link to the history of the Philharmonic Auditorium:

http://bigorangelandmarks.blogspot.c...uditorium.html

Last edited by KevinW; Feb 25, 2011 at 2:33 AM. Reason: Adding Pix
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  #2967  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2011, 4:04 AM
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What an outstanding detailed post on the history of Pershing Square. Thanks KevinW
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  #2968  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2011, 8:49 AM
Sebisebster Sebisebster is offline
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Thank you very much KevinW! You did a great job... Photos, information and the links were a good help! I really appreciate it!

Last edited by Sebisebster; Feb 25, 2011 at 1:49 PM.
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  #2969  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2011, 1:01 PM
malumot malumot is offline
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Simply incredible work, Kevin.

And comparing the park THEN with the park NOW (Sebisebster's color photo, further back up the page)......

How I hate artsy-fartsy planner types. That brutal angular tower. The garish purple. The retarded giant orange concrete balls. The predictable "water feature", in this case to invoke the Zanja Madre, of course, but which does nothing more than look like a downspout during a heavy rain.

Hundreds of thousands of dollars were spent on the name-brand, fancy-pants professional designers of this atrociousness.....and came away with an end-product not 1/10th as good as what a handful of amateur town burghers did 120 years ago.

DEVO was right.




My - this spot looks inviting. About as much as a Target parking lot. Did the city pay extra for those constellation depictions?




The ice skating is cool, but they could have set that up anywhere.....



And just to show I'm not being especially hard on Modern Man: NYC also spent millions on refurbishment of Bryant Park a few years back. On 42nd Street, in the same block as the NY Public Library. I'm sure many of you have been there, or at least heard of it.

It's gorgeous.




Last edited by malumot; Feb 25, 2011 at 1:41 PM.
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  #2970  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2011, 2:11 PM
Sebisebster Sebisebster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malumot View Post
Simply incredible work, Kevin.

And comparing the park THEN with the park NOW (Sebisebster's color photo, further back up the page)......

How I hate artsy-fartsy planner types. That brutal angular tower. The garish purple. The retarded giant orange concrete balls. The predictable "water feature", in this case to invoke the Zanja Madre, of course, but which does nothing more than look like a downspout during a heavy rain.

Hundreds of thousands of dollars were spent on the name-brand, fancy-pants professional designers of this atrociousness.....and came away with an end-product not 1/10th as good as what a handful of amateur town burghers did 120 years ago.
Pershing Square in 1988, looking north




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Now, a winning model of a proposed re-design of Pershing Square, created by SITE in 1986:



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According to LAPL, the project's name was Magic Carpet and design features an undulating concrete canopy covering Pershing Square's underground garage. SITE's Jim Wines presented this scheme as an "iconic grid" emblematic of the pattern of Los Angeles as seen from the air.

Ok.

What if this project would have come into reality? A green carpet, like a grid, covering the park?
I really dont understand modern art either, honestly.
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  #2971  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2011, 2:21 PM
Los Angeles Past Los Angeles Past is offline
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Thank you to Gaylord and ethereal for the Woodbury College info! I had previously known about the Spring Street and Hamburger locations, but the dates did not fit my mom's stay at Woodbury. I appreciate the help filling in this detail of my family's past.

-Scott

Last edited by Los Angeles Past; Jun 12, 2012 at 10:12 PM.
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  #2972  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2011, 2:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

usc digital archive


It's a GIANT woman's shoe!!

Another interesting detail is the banner across the street. The banner reads "VOTE FOR OWENS RIVER JUNE 12"
(it's hard to read the banner in the photo, but it was mentioned in the description of the photo at USC Archive)

This must be the vote on whether or not to issue BONDS for the Los Angeles Aqueduct!

________________

Love that banner--and the shoe. I got interested in the Grant Building, on top of which sat the shoe...

CSU http://www.csulb.edu/~odinthor/BroN4th.jpg

CSU http://www.csulb.edu/~odinthor/BroShoe.jpg

LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics08/00013830.jpg
A lovely noirish 6AM shot down Broadway...


USCDL


So I went looking for the Grant Building, and I was reminded of the now low-rise character of the Broadway
streetscape between 3rd and 4th. Much of it seems to be taxpayers, at least for the moment, anyway. At
first, the Grant appeared to be gone along with the shoe. But... the curve... eight windows on the 4th
Street side, five along Broadway... it looks as though that it might not be gone entirely:

Google Street View

Last edited by GaylordWilshire; Oct 11, 2013 at 12:05 PM.
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  #2973  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2011, 3:49 PM
Los Angeles Past Los Angeles Past is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinW View Post
In 1938, the Philharmonic Auditorium got a Deco makeover
*laughs* My mother worked at The Auditorium in 1938. The noise and dust from the renovation drove her crazy! She left her position with the Civic Light Opera to get married, but when that didn't work out and she had to go back into the work-a-day world, she left Downtown and took a secretarial job at Utter-McKinley Mortuary. Much quieter!

-Scott

Last edited by Los Angeles Past; Jun 12, 2012 at 10:16 PM.
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  #2974  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2011, 2:31 AM
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A new cable line on Broadway 1889. The sign on the cable car reads Downey Ave.



usc digital archive






below: Looking south on Broadway from 2nd Street showing the cable & rails.


usc digital archive

(sorry about the missing images. I'll try to replace them soon.)

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Aug 25, 2014 at 1:53 AM.
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  #2975  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2011, 8:18 AM
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The Oscars are this Sunday. Interesting, because on February 27, 1941, the 13th Academy Awards were presented-- 70 years ago to the date. It was held at the Biltmore Bowl of the Biltmore Hotel.

For the occasion, the Academy installed a 15-foot neon Oscar over one of the entrances to the Biltmore.

hollywoodgoldenguy.com


The Biltmore Bowl itself used to be a very elegant ballroom.

USC Archive

It doesn't look like this anymore. It's been massively remodeled/destroyed. You'd think it'd be restored to its original elegance, being that the rest of the hotel and some of its ballrooms look like how they originally did.


Two of the big winners that night: Best Actor winner James Stewart for "The Philadelphia Story" and Best Actress winner Ginger Rogers for "Kitty Foyle."

newcritics.com

The Academy Awards were first presented in 1929 at the Blossom Room of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. From 1930 to 1943, the awards ceremonies would flip-flop between the Fiesta Room or Cocoanut Grove at the Ambassador Hotel, and the Sala D'Oro or Biltmore Bowl at the Biltmore Hotel. They were presented in a dinner banquet format. By 1943, Academy membership had grown so large that at that year's ceremony, held at the Cocoanut Grove, people were seated at dinner tables cheek to jowl:

lapl.org

After the ceremony, the Hollywood Reporter complained, "Never in the history of Academy dinners was there such a compression of tables and people. It was almost impossible to get through the aisles and, with tables stacked up as far as the bandstand, there wasn't a foot of space on the dance floor."

It was clear that dinner banquets were no longer practical for the Oscar ceremonies. That was the last ceremony held in a dinner banquet format. The following year in 1944, the Oscars moved into a theater for the first time. The venue was Grauman's Chinese Theatre, and ceremonies would be held there from 1944-1946. In 1945, a bona fide film noir was up for Academy Awards: Double Indemnity. It received 7 Oscar nominations: Best Picture, Best Actress (Barbara Stanwyck), Best Director (Billy Wilder), Best Screenplay, Best Black-and-White Cinematography, Best Sound Recording and Best Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture. It won none.

Here's Grauman's Chinese on March 7, 1946, the night it hosted the 18th Academy Awards. That was the year Joan Crawford won Best Actress for Mildred Pierce and Ray Milland won Best Actor for The Lost Weekend.

lapl.org

The fans in the bleachers across the street:

lapl.org

In the 1960s, some old-time Academy members started reminiscing about the old Academy Award dinners, saying that since the awards moved into theaters, and with them being televised since 1953, the awards ceremonies have never been the same. Gone was the intimacy; they were no longer a private movie industry event. And now, they've gotten bigger since even the 1960s; today the Oscars are a complete international media circus.

Here's the Cocoanut Grove back when it was happenin' and glamorous.

lapl.org

Here's the Ambassador Hotel's Fiesta Room in 1926:

lapl.org

The Fiesta Room during the 3rd Academy Awards, November 5, 1930. All Quiet on the Western Front won Best Picture that night, as well as Best Director for Lewis Milestone. Norma Shearer won Best Actress for The Divorcee and George Arliss won Best Actor for Disraeli.

oscars.org

Here it is in 2005, before the Ambassador's demolition in January of 2006:

lapl.org

If those walls could talk. But of course those walls have been knocked down.

Addendum: I failed to mention earlier that the Fiesta Room was later remodeled in the 1950s by noted architect Paul Williams in that Greco-Roman style, and renamed the Embassy Ballroom; this is the ballroom that Robert F. Kennedy made his victory speech in, before walking into the pantry and being gunned down by Sirhan Sirhan.
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Last edited by sopas ej; Feb 27, 2011 at 4:13 AM.
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  #2976  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2011, 9:26 AM
malumot malumot is offline
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I LOVE IT.

That shot oozes Noir, Gaylord.

What did that street see last night, I wonder?

An LA version of the Turner Classic Movies ALL NIGHT promo. (Which itself is a collection of short scenes stitched together from Stanley Kubrick's "Killer's Kiss" - 1955.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBs_uTNTIeI







Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics08/00013830.jpg
A lovely noirish 6AM shot down Broadway...
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  #2977  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2011, 1:53 PM
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sopas: That was a great Oscar-venue roundup--but you missed one. 426 N. Bristol Ave., Brentwood, 1946:


http://www.life.com/image/51871862/in-gallery/39982

Michael Curtiz, director of Mildred Pierce, presenting the Oscar for Best Actress in bed.



http://www.joancrawfordbest.com



http://www.joancrawfordbest.com



malumot: Pssst--there's a body in the trunk of the car at right.

Last edited by GaylordWilshire; Feb 26, 2011 at 2:11 PM.
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  #2978  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2011, 12:06 AM
kanhawk kanhawk is offline
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Would this be the house where NO. WIRE. HANGERS. where allowed?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
sopas: That was a great Oscar-venue roundup--but you missed one. 426 N. Bristol Ave., Brentwood, 1946:


http://www.life.com/image/51871862/in-gallery/39982
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  #2979  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2011, 2:22 AM
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The 26th annual Academy Awards Ceremony at the Pantages Theater on Hollywood Blvd. (1954)



ucla digital archive


above: To the extreme right you can see a portion of the neon sign for the Frolic Room.





below: The exquisite neon above the entrance to the Frolic Room.


Bill Hornstein




After all these years the Frolic Room is still in business.


T. Hoffarth

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Feb 27, 2011 at 3:36 AM.
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  #2980  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2011, 4:16 AM
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I've never been to the Frolic Room, though I've always wanted to go. Don't know why I never made the effort.
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