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  #41  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2016, 5:42 AM
Skagit Skagit is offline
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Why are they calling the CLT, "111 NE MLK"? None of the proposed building occurs on MLK....
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  #42  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2016, 6:56 PM
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Looking at the drawings I wonder if this might be a condo project. The unit plans are pretty generous compared to most new rental and there are no internal bedrooms. Also floor to floor heights of over 11 ft and a lot of glass. Typically that kind of boutique, high-end product is sold rather than rented. On the other hand the parking ratio is still around .5 which could be a challenge to sell and the rental market hasn't softened yet. In any case it would be exciting to see more balance between rental and ownership housing getting built.
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  #43  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2016, 7:04 PM
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Looking at the drawings I wonder if this might be a condo project. The unit plans are pretty generous compared to most new rental and there are no internal bedrooms. Also floor to floor heights of over 11 ft and a lot of glass. Typically that kind of boutique, high-end product is sold rather than rented. On the other hand the parking ratio is still around .5 which could be a challenge to sell and the rental market hasn't softened yet. In any case it would be exciting to see more balance between rental and ownership housing getting built.
More than likely it is being done as a rental with the thought of turning it to condos at a later date. That tends to be an easier way to get a condo building built these days.
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  #44  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2016, 7:56 PM
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Gorgeous. I hope it ends up being that reflective. It could end up being the showpiece of the Burnside Bridgehead.

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Looking at the drawings I wonder if this might be a condo project. The unit plans are pretty generous compared to most new rental and there are no internal bedrooms.
Do you mean, they're open loft style? I'm not sure if the average renter or condo buyer prefers that style, but I love it. An open loft feels so modern and it gives you so much more space to work with... but I realize the style isn't for everybody. I sure do love it though.
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  #45  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2016, 9:29 PM
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I mean the bedrooms are all on an exterior wall with a real window.

There should really be a name for the new "1 bedroom" type with the bed enclosure at the back of the unit. I don't think you should be allowed to advertise it as a bedroom because it doesn't have a window. The term "loft" doesn't fit because there's no lofted space and it may well have an 8 ft ceiling.
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  #46  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2016, 9:38 PM
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I mean the bedrooms are all on an exterior wall with a real window.
Gotcha!

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There should really be a name for the new "1 bedroom" type with the bed enclosure at the back of the unit. I don't think you should be allowed to advertise it as a bedroom because it doesn't have a window. The term "loft" doesn't fit because there's no lofted space and it may well have an 8 ft ceiling.
I agree completely. Shotgun style 1 bedrooms aren't really bedrooms in the sense that the bed "room" doesn't have four complete walls and a door (and usually doesn't have a window either). I lived in a shotgun style loft once and the bedroom felt claustrophobic to me.
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  #47  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2016, 8:01 PM
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Drawings [PDF - 35MB] from yesterday's presentation to the Design Commission. Includes some more images.
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  #48  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2016, 8:22 PM
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I have to say: as much as I don't like above-ground auto storage, the transparency of the stacked parking is great. Talk about honesty in architecture.
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  #49  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2016, 9:03 PM
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I have to say: as much as I don't like above-ground auto storage, the transparency of the stacked parking is great. Talk about honesty in architecture.


I actually think that's kind of awesome, but I can't wait to hear what the design commission says about it.
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  #50  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2016, 9:14 PM
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That's probably the strongest execution of above ground parking in a residential building I've seen in a long time. Such a far cry from the massive parking podiums on some of the buildings in Miami and Chicago.
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  #51  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2016, 6:58 PM
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DJC is reporting ($) that this building wont be wood after all. Having spoken with people at PATH about the challenges of getting Carbon12 approved this doesn't really surprise me, but I'm still a little disappointed.
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  #52  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2016, 7:18 PM
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DJC is reporting ($) that this building wont be wood after all. Having spoken with people at PATH about the challenges of getting Carbon12 approved this doesn't really surprise me, but I'm still a little disappointed.
That is a shame, hopefully Carbon12 will help change that process and make it easier for timber buildings to get built.
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  #53  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2016, 8:55 PM
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Too bad about the loss of CLT, but what about their renderings which currently show 100% glazing on all the upper dwelling units? It looks really good, but will it be permitted under energy code? I'd be surprised. Chances are they'll have to introduce some spandrel panel and or other areas of solid wall, and probably increase the reflectivity of the storefront panels (reading the DJC article, it's not intended to be a true curtain wall), all of which will affect the design. Or perhaps it's triple glazed?... Hopefully they're able to maintain the appearance, and more importantly, represent it honestly to the design commission so they don't run into the same problem as the Yard.

Edit: After looking at the renderings a second time, there do appear to be a select number of spandrel panels which blend in for the most part, similar to the Cosmopolitan, so perhaps they already have it figured out (hopefully).
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  #54  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2016, 9:43 PM
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Who cares about the CLT, just get this baby built this tower is gorgeous
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  #55  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2016, 9:49 PM
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People care about the use of CLT, innovativethinking, because it would have been innovative.
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  #56  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2016, 2:59 PM
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Wood cut out of plans at Block 75

By: Beverly Corbell in Scrolling Box February 1, 2016 10:40 am


Block 75 North (Works Partnership Architecture)
Block 75 North (Works Partnership Architecture)

Another high-rise planned at the Burnside bridgehead may be headed for approval, but it won’t feature cross-laminated timber (CLT) as proposed originally.

The Portland Design Commission on Thursday heard a staff report and discussed details of the proposed 19-story, mixed-use building at 111 N.W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. The building is being designed by Works Partnership Architecture for Beam Development and will complete development of Block 75 near the Burnside Bridge’s east end. Urban Development Partners is co-developer of the project.

Use of wood in construction was barely mentioned during the meeting to provide design advice. A post-tensioned concrete frame is now planned, with steel and glass cladding.

In October 2015, Beam Development principal Brad Malsin said he would like to use CLT for the building, but would have to evaluate costs first. Also, Portland city building codes would have to be changed. An 18-story building in the works in Vancouver, British Columbia, would become the tallest constructed with CLT.

This new project near the intersection of Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Couch Street represents the second and final phase of development at Lot 75, where a 10-story concrete-and-steel building, also designed by Works Partnership, is under construction. Discussion at Thursday’s meeting centered on the state-of-the-art mechanical parking garage and more mundane issues like quantities of curb cuts, loading stalls and sidewalk canopies.

Plans call for a basement service level, street-level retail space, a second-floor commercial area, four levels of mechanized parking and 13 levels of residential units. The mechanized parking will allow two layers of cars per level, city planner Tim Heron said.

“Cars are not 10 feet tall; they’re five feet tall, so you can do two layers of cars on one level,” he said. “You would drive into the elevator, get out of the car and take your keys with you and robots take it up and park it.”

Carrie Strickland, a principal at Works Partnership, said plans call for 80 to 100 mechanized parking stalls.

“We are striving to get at least a one-to-one parking count in the building,” she said.

Strickland said that only a mechanized parking structure being built in Philadelphia will be similar to the one planned at Block 75.

Works Partnership principal William Neburka added that views from outside of the parking garage can be an asset.

“With glazing and simple graphic scheme we can see how that parking can call attention to itself as an active element,” he said.

Neburka went on to tell commissioners that the clear glass curtain will actually be a window wall and be used with metal panels.

“We probably should have a conversation on how we begin to integrate some more opaque or textured materials (and) allow some parking glass and glass as transparent as possible at the base of the building,” he said.

Strickland then asked if glass in the auto lobby could count toward the required glazing percentage, but Commissioner Tad Savinar said no. Later in the meeting he said that a different glass treatment might have more appeal.

“If you have a light frost on the windows you could see moving forms instead of moving cars,” he said. “And that could be a lot more interesting from across the river, from a distance, to actually have the building breathing and moving instead of focusing on the mechanical action of moving a car.”

Although Strickland and Williams pointed to planned overhangs as protection for pedestrians, Commissioner Julie Livingston said that canopies would be needed.

“You do need to address canopies because the overhangs aren’t close enough to the street to provide good protection,” she said.

Commissioners late in the meeting focused on including sidewalk canopies in the design and deciding the number of curb cuts that will be needed for loading and vehicle access. The current proposal includes two curb cuts on Northeast Davis Street – one for loading and one for the mechanical parking elevator.

“It’s possible they may need a third loading stall,” Heron said after the meeting. “My crystal ball is telling me they’re going to need another loading stall.”
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  #57  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2016, 4:01 AM
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“We probably should have a conversation on how we begin to integrate some more opaque or textured materials (and) allow some parking glass and glass as transparent as possible at the base of the building,” he said.

Strickland then asked if glass in the auto lobby could count toward the required glazing percentage, but Commissioner Tad Savinar said no. Later in the meeting he said that a different glass treatment might have more appeal.

“If you have a light frost on the windows you could see moving forms instead of moving cars,” he said. “And that could be a lot more interesting from across the river, from a distance, to actually have the building breathing and moving instead of focusing on the mechanical action of moving a car.”

Sounds like another case of the city moving the goal posts.
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  #58  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2016, 4:59 AM
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“If you have a light frost on the windows you could see moving forms instead of moving cars,” he said.
That's a great idea in theory, but in practice it makes no sense. The "forms" won't be moving. They'll be parked. Sure, occasionally, one will leave and another will arrive, but we're talking about hours still, when parked, vs a few seconds of motion when pulling in or out of a spot - unless the lot is designed in a way that doesn't put parked cars against the outer walls... and that's highly highly highly unlikely. I'd think the clear glass, as designed, makes more sense, visually.
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  #59  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2016, 6:38 AM
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That's a great idea in theory, but in practice it makes no sense. The "forms" won't be moving. They'll be parked. Sure, occasionally, one will leave and another will arrive, but we're talking about hours still, when parked, vs a few seconds of motion when pulling in or out of a spot - unless the lot is designed in a way that doesn't put parked cars against the outer walls... and that's highly highly highly unlikely. I'd think the clear glass, as designed, makes more sense, visually.
I love the idea of clear glass on the parking floors. I'm fascinated by how these robotic parking mechanisms work and very intrigued by the idea of essentially putting one on display.
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  #60  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2016, 6:52 AM
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I love the idea of clear glass on the parking floors. I'm fascinated by how these robotic parking mechanisms work and very intrigued by the idea of essentially putting one on display.
I agree 100%.
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