HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Midwest

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1661  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2018, 9:14 PM
Chicagoguy Chicagoguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 589
What I would love to see (especially with a completed high speed connection to O'Hare) is if United Airlines were to anchor a new massive tower attached to the Thompson Center. I know they have nearly outgrown all of their current space at Willis Tower, and it could be great marketing to have "Chicago's airline" be located across the street from the new Block 37 Superstation! These are massive pipe dreams I know.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1662  
Old Posted Jun 21, 2018, 12:43 AM
ardecila's Avatar
ardecila ardecila is offline
atomic
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: the city o'wind
Posts: 13,016
^ No, that actually raises a great point. I'm not sure how often United's HQ people visit the airport, but if it's a lot, then United could be a key user of Musk's system and may in fact strike some kind of bulk deal with him for United employees to travel between the airport and the downtown offices. In that scenario, I'm positive that UA would start looking for large blocks of space near Block 37.
__________________
la forme d'une ville change plus vite, hélas! que le coeur d'un mortel...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1663  
Old Posted Jun 21, 2018, 1:36 PM
chiphile's Avatar
chiphile chiphile is offline
yes
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: chicago
Posts: 475
Quote:
Originally Posted by LouisVanDerWright View Post
The O'Hare superstation is ideally placed to serve both the CBD and main tourisn hubs. What exactly would it change to encourage offices to move back East? The critical mass of business services has migrated West. That's what is what has moved the offices, not proximity to OHare.

Most of the old class C and B office that housed critical, but lower rent, business services has been anhilated in the East Loop. Office is not moving back there because the highest and best use of that area was permenantly altered by Millennium Park. That's the "push" and the pull is proximity to Metra Stations which isn't going to change either. So no, the Loop is not the next Loop. The center of gravity of the CBD will continue to drift West as the handful of times your Employees will need to go straight from work to the airport is irelevant compared to the conveniece of their daily commutes. People don't build offices because travelers from out of town can get to their office from the airport 10 minutes quicker, they locate for their employees.
I was thinking how B37 logistics would work, and it may be very tight. One side of a block is 300 feet, wrapped around you have 1200 feet of curbside space around an entire block. Terminal 1 at O'Hare alone has about 1100 feet of curbside drop off space, on TWO levels (so 2200 total), and then you multiply that by 4 for all the other terminals. If B37 happens, the traffic crunch may be unmanageable even with accounting for the fact that most people will use transit to get there.

Further, the changes to B37, removing the retail and making it more terminal-like, altering streets and curbs, converting the apartment to hotel (almost a given), would also be necessary to make it a true centerpiece terminal. If the actual station is just that cave in the basement, it would be a poor entrance to Chicago after getting off of Musk's train and would be worse than the Amtrak gates at Union Station right now.

Nevertheless, B37 would be a permanent economic shield and will prevent the east loop from ever losing value or competitive advantage to the office migration west. As stated, most new towers would still go west, but I can see at least 3-4 being built around B37, along with TONS of hotel conversions, and any employees who have to travel from the office will be 10 minutes away via just walking or cab or transit.

And, I see all that happening with or without TSA pre-clearance. But if there isn't security at B37, the new O'Hare stations should have it as soon as you step off the train.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1664  
Old Posted Jun 21, 2018, 1:53 PM
the urban politician the urban politician is offline
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Libertyville, IL
Posts: 14,575
^ Why would any retail have to be moved at all from B37?

You could run this whole operation from that subterranean cave. My understanding is that it’s pretty huge. After all, it was built exactly for this purpose—to be a huge downtown terminus.

I’m sure if Musk is business savvy he could score some local partners in building out the downtown terminus—perhaps a revenue sharing deal with the owner of B37 itself, and yes I love the idea of group corporate deals to use the express service. I can totally see that happen
__________________
Stop villainizing market-rate housing
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1665  
Old Posted Jun 21, 2018, 2:13 PM
chiphile's Avatar
chiphile chiphile is offline
yes
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: chicago
Posts: 475
Quote:
Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post
^ Why would any retail have to be moved at all from B37?

You could run this whole operation from that subterranean cave. My understanding is that it’s pretty huge. After all, it was built exactly for this purpose—to be a huge downtown terminus.

I’m sure if Musk is business savvy he could score some local partners in building out the downtown terminus—perhaps a revenue sharing deal with the owner of B37 itself, and yes I love the idea of group corporate deals to use the express service. I can totally see that happen
Not removed but perhaps relocated to create the high-ceiling grand airport terminal-like architecture. Most good terminals have plenty of retail anyway, but if 3 entire blocks are to be used as airport drop-off points (one for arrivals, one for departure, and one for ground/hotel shuttles), that curbside retail would have to move. I just think it would be awesome to have a literal airport terminal downtown, b/c who else has that(?), rather than the cave be just one thing underneath B37.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1666  
Old Posted Jun 21, 2018, 6:57 PM
NiHao NiHao is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by LouisVanDerWright View Post
This is just another reason why we ultimately need a high speed transit connection to Milwaukee. One wonders if there might not be a change of heart on Scott Walker's part if Foxconn wants a connection between it's campus and HQ?

Ideally we can just continue the HyperLoop all the way from O'Hare to Milwaukee with stops every 20 miles or so along the route. Can you imagine what a wet dream that would be? Chicago Loop to Milwaukee in 30 minutes. Milwaukee to O'Hare in 25 minutes. Loop to Mitchell Airport in 25 minutes.

That would truly be a connection to make even the fanciest Asian megacities feel inadequate.
Every 20 miles? The next stop should be mil airport, and then downtown Milwaukee. Small towns shouldn’t be subsidized.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1667  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 12:47 AM
LouisVanDerWright LouisVanDerWright is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,164
Quote:
Originally Posted by NiHao View Post
Every 20 miles? The next stop should be mil airport, and then downtown Milwaukee. Small towns shouldn’t be subsidized.
Lol what a joke, they aren't being subsidized. If anything they need help, have you seen the state of small town America????

I'm getting married in Des Moines tomorrow, but this place is thriving. Small town America is the heart of this country. If it completely rots out we will have issues. Also you must not have ever been to the Milwaukee - Chicago corridor. It's thriving and needs to be connected to the cities. It's not like we are talking about running a train to Galena for a few tourists. Stuff like Amazon warehouses, Uline warehouses, and Foxconn plants won't fit in the city, they need Greenfield sites. It will only help Chicago if people can live in the city and work at these huge employers.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1668  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 12:50 AM
left of center's Avatar
left of center left of center is offline
1st Ward
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: The Big Onion
Posts: 1,503
^ Congrats on the wedding, LVDW!








Why in god's name are you on SSP right now!? lol
__________________
"Eventually, I think Chicago will be the most beautiful great city left in the world." -Frank Lloyd Wright
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1669  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 2:55 AM
ardecila's Avatar
ardecila ardecila is offline
atomic
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: the city o'wind
Posts: 13,016
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiphile View Post
Not removed but perhaps relocated to create the high-ceiling grand airport terminal-like architecture. Most good terminals have plenty of retail anyway, but if 3 entire blocks are to be used as airport drop-off points (one for arrivals, one for departure, and one for ground/hotel shuttles), that curbside retail would have to move. I just think it would be awesome to have a literal airport terminal downtown, b/c who else has that(?), rather than the cave be just one thing underneath B37.
The cavern seems to be about the height/width of the Logan Square stop on the Blue Line, but not as long. It's really not that huge.

However, B37 was designed to bring daylight all the way down to the train platforms. There's a big area of floor on the lower level between Pret and the elevator banks, that is removable and probably will be removed during Musk's build-out.

Again, I think you're overestimating the capacity of this transit system. It will not be able to carry the massive volumes of people you keep referring to. However, it is possible that the B37 parking garage or portions of it could be converted to a dropoff or queuing zone. I believe the upper level of the garage is on the same level as the station cavern, while the lower levels of the garage actually go below the station.
__________________
la forme d'une ville change plus vite, hélas! que le coeur d'un mortel...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1670  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 2:27 PM
Baronvonellis Baronvonellis is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 559
Des Moines- the next Chicago!! My Grandpa was born on a farm near Des Moines, I've never been there and neither has my Dad lol. Honestly, doing a 5 hour drive there and back again through corn fields seems pretty dull, we need a high speed hyperloop to Des Moines! Congrats on the wedding though! Maybe one day in a Galaxy far far away,,, my Dad and I will do the drive to Des Moines to see all it glory, majesty, and splendor!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1671  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 2:27 PM
LouisVanDerWright LouisVanDerWright is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,164
Quote:
Originally Posted by left of center View Post
^ Congrats on the wedding, LVDW!



Why in god's name are you on SSP right now!? lol
Haha thanks, I meant Saturday. I'm signing off now for the weekend!

PS there's a ton of good stuff on crains right now about Outcome Health, a $100 million IPO, and an article titled something like "why tech companies like Chicago more than you think. I don't have time to post them, someone else should.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1672  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 2:37 PM
sentinel's Avatar
sentinel sentinel is offline
Plenary pleasures.
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,738
Quote:
Originally Posted by LouisVanDerWright View Post
Haha thanks, I meant Saturday. I'm signing off now for the weekend!

PS there's a ton of good stuff on crains right now about Outcome Health, a $100 million IPO, and an article titled something like "why tech companies like Chicago more than you think. I don't have time to post them, someone else should.
Congrats LVDW, best wishes for many happy years to you and your partner!
__________________
Don't be shy. Step into the light.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1673  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 2:54 PM
sentinel's Avatar
sentinel sentinel is offline
Plenary pleasures.
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,738
Crain's is becoming less and less cogent in why they allow guest/opinion writers, and frankly, it's making them less appealing because they aren't reporting business news, but providing a tit-for-tat platform, especially to spread misinformation, that inevitably needs to be responded to, seemingly to just pad their reader base:

Yesterday, a known Trump sympathizer turdkin, Charlie Kirk, blasted the City Treasurer, Kurt Summers for his investment strategy for the City's money, primarily because the long-term portfolio positions favor carbon or clean-energy-related investment strategies (I will not link to the article because I've decided I will no longer do that for Crains; you can visit the site yourself). It was a non-starter debate frankly, only to try to convince readers that the strategy was silly, ineffective and will lose money, essentially trying to smear the Treasurer's office by claiming they are gambling away the City's money by focusing on non-traditional investment opportunities.

Kurt Summers replied this morning, very clearly and gracefully stating the reasons behind his investment strategy, and how his strategy has been proven to provide a greater return on investment than portfolios that focus on traditional and dirty energy companies.

My problem with Crain's is that they are giving a platform to a uneducated, 23 year old Trump-loving, sycophant who's blindly reacting to a something he doesn't understand, namely how clean energy is a better strategy for long-term investment...solely to cater to an uneducated and reactionary section of the populace...they are helping further a cult of thoughtlessness by featuring people like Charlie Kirk.

Apologies, rant over. If you would like online resources that explain how renewable and clean energy companies are helping power the future of investing (which I am heavily invested in myself), I will gladly post resources anyone can use.
__________________
Don't be shy. Step into the light.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1674  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 4:38 PM
maru2501's Avatar
maru2501 maru2501 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: chicago
Posts: 994
Rahm takes a knock for his affordable housing shortcomings

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/c...518-story.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1675  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 6:09 PM
jpIllInoIs's Avatar
jpIllInoIs jpIllInoIs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 878
Not so sexy industrial dev

Not the usual tech office opening or HQ relo we are accustomed to...But i find this trend interesting. Both of these projects are built on older empty industrial land. Both are near the Loop and are intended to serve the high growth population center with e-commerce, last mile logistics. They provide new jobs and tax revenue and accelerate demand to develop other large, underutilized industrial sites.

The largest spec warehouse in over a century builds on Chicago’s history
Scheduled for completion this fall, Marina Crossings (43rd & Damen Back of the Yards) is unique in that, though it is on an infill location within five miles of Chicago’s CBD, it is a massive project on par with new developments going up on greenfield sites in Chicago’s exurbs. The finished building will be 633,000 square feet, with 32-foot ceilings, cross docking, precast construction and ample expandable car and trailer parking, on a 35-acre, rail-served property.

The I-55 Corridor has become an important industrial thoroughfare in the Chicago market. As it extends into Chicago proper, it becomes more focused on two main uses: e-commerce and food processing. Goldwasser sees a lot of parallels between those two sectors. “Really, food distribution was the original last mile delivery. That’s the way we look at it,” Goldwasser said. “Everyone’s talking about e-commerce now, where they need to be able to get to their end user immediately. That’s really what food distribution always has been in Chicago. It really hasn’t changed. The food distributors need to be just as close to the population as e-commerce, last mile delivery facilities do.”

With the I-55 Corridor connecting bulk distribution centers further south with last mile fulfillment facilities in the city, the neighborhoods along this corridor are seeing significant e-commerce, cold storage and general distribution activities. Marina Crossings is perfectly positioned to provide an ideal real estate solution for companies wishing to take advantage of its size, location, access to a labor pool of nearly two million and Chicago’s vast population of customers.

New 316k SF spec industrial building coming to Chicago
Conor Commercial Real Estate broke ground in April on their newest project, Last Mile Logistics Center I-55. A groundbreaking ceremony took place this week at the project site, located at the intersection of 51st Street and St. Louis Avenue in Chicago. (Archer Heights/Brigthon Park)

Last Mile Logistics Center I-55 will be a 316,550-square-feet, state-of-the-art spec facility situated on 19.6 acres of land and offer a Class 6b tax incentive. The building will feature 55 truck docks, 36-foot clear height, 71 trailer stalls and 50-foot x 52-foot bays. Divisible to 50,000 square feet, the facility offers logistical advantages with its close proximity to I-55 and the CTA Orange Line within the South City submarket.

“We have been preparing for this project for some time and we are ecstatic to be able to transform this underutilized infill parcel into a highly functional, Class A industrial property providing convenient transportation access and the flexibility to accommodate an array of industrial users, including e-commerce and last mile providers,” said Brian Quigley, executive vice president at Conor Commercial Real Estate.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1676  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 7:10 PM
the urban politician the urban politician is offline
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Libertyville, IL
Posts: 14,575
^ I believe I had posted that news a while back

It's a wonderful trend. I want Chicago to still offer blue collar jobs, and not just turn completely into a white collar city like Boston or SF.

Diversity rules
__________________
Stop villainizing market-rate housing
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1677  
Old Posted Yesterday, 1:08 AM
NiHao NiHao is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by LouisVanDerWright View Post
Lol what a joke, they aren't being subsidized. If anything they need help, have you seen the state of small town America????

I'm getting married in Des Moines tomorrow, but this place is thriving. Small town America is the heart of this country. If it completely rots out we will have issues. Also you must not have ever been to the Milwaukee - Chicago corridor. It's thriving and needs to be connected to the cities. It's not like we are talking about running a train to Galena for a few tourists. Stuff like Amazon warehouses, Uline warehouses, and Foxconn plants won't fit in the city, they need Greenfield sites. It will only help Chicago if people can live in the city and work at these huge employers.
I’m from Green Bay. I have family scattered into upper michicagan. I live in Chicago.

Towns like iron mountain can die.


Those industrial sites don’t need high end rail connections. They need any rail connections. My mother used to ride down from iron mountain to Chicago on the train for shopping. That doesn’t exist anymore. Governor fuckface in Wisconsin denied tons of rail expansion. Small towns voted for him. They can die.
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Midwest
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 6:07 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.