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  #121  
Old Posted May 1, 2015, 10:39 PM
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Smile New york | m500 | 150 ft | 14 floors

Project: M500





Quote:
They reveal the complex has a name: The M500. Sounds like something out of a Bond film. Should go well with the smoldering interior renderings interior designers Raad Studio released earlier this year.

The new renderings are at least the fourth set from as many architects. Kutnicki Bernstein has stuck with the basic concept — a wedge-shaped complex — and given it more definition. The complex wraps around existing properties on the block. It has entrances, retail and signage next door to Kellogg’s Diner on Union, along Metropolitan Avenue, and also on Rodney, which faces the BQE. The complex will be visible from the highway.

The interplay of the facade and windows creates striped and checkerboard patterns. A cutaway into the wedge also changes texture.

Meanwhile, at the construction site itself, where one of the new renderings has been posted, the foundation has been poured. This is one of several ambitious projects under way in Williamsburg right now. (Others include the William Vale Hotel, the Yotel, and the block-long spec office building at 19 Kent Avenue.)
=================================
http://www.brownstoner.com/blog/2015...-frontpage-top
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  #122  
Old Posted May 3, 2015, 4:04 AM
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I feel like New York is doubling its amount of current skyscrapers by the end of the decade. That might not even be much of an exaggeration.
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  #123  
Old Posted May 4, 2015, 9:22 PM
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Construction has begun on 319 Schermerhorn Street. Its that 21 floor condo tower developed by SC Nevins. Listed in the 4th page.

Original Post:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...8&postcount=84
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  #124  
Old Posted May 5, 2015, 10:17 PM
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Smile NEW YORK | WeWork/WeLive at Navy Yard | FT | 13 FLOORS

Project: WeWork/WeLive at Navy Yard





Quote:
S9′s plan for the new structure would extend it along an existing pier, which juts into the East River. While YIMBY does not have exact details, a rough count indicates the project would rise 14 stories tall, and if previous reports regarding WeWork are correct, it will measure over 500,000 square feet. Either way, it would be substantially larger than any of the office projects under construction elsewhere in Brooklyn at the moment.

In terms of design, the building features an expansive first floor, criss-crossed by diagonal beams that act as visual supports for the rest of the structure, which appears to be faced in concrete. Zig-zags of glass cross the upper envelope, and the end result acts as a contemporary complement to the old industrial buildings that stand nearby.

The exact mix between WeWork and WeLive is unknown but the rendered structure measures approximately 600,000 gross square feet, leaving plenty of room for both to operate under the same roof. The floor area is stepped back in three primary setbacks, each of which is topped with usable green space for the building’s occupants.
==============================
http://www.yimbynews.com/2015/05/fir...navy-yard.html
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  #125  
Old Posted May 6, 2015, 6:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris08876 View Post
Updated Renderings from FXFOWLE: 44-28 Purves Street



1) 386 Feet
2) 35 Floors
Under Construction: 44-28 Purveys Street in LIC

LAUREN ELKIES SCHRAM
5/06/2015

Quote:
Long Island City is getting what is likely the first new LEED Silver-designed apartment building in Queens that utilizes both solar and wind power.

In addition to the LEED certification, the two-building project is slated for acceptance into the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority New Construction Program, and has been accepted into the Brownfield Cleanup Program; it is currently in the process of being cleaned up.

Under development by Brause Realty and Gotham Organization with a design by FXFOWLE, the 35-story residential rental complex at 44-28 Purves Street, bordered by Thomson Avenue and 44th Drive, is also going through the feng shui certification process, which will “ensure proper energy [moves] through the project,” said FXFOWLE’s Gustavo Rodriguez.

David Brause, the president of Brause Realty, said: “Wind, water and the energies of the environment are important to incorporate into the design of a building.”

The building design calls for a wind turbine producing power as well as a solar power screen, a green roof, ample outdoor space and water retention tanks.

The 267,000-square-foot development will have 270 market-rate units, 26,300 square feet of amenities, 15,000 square feet of outdoor space and 75 parking spaces. Apartments will range from studios to one- and two-bedroom units, all market rate and ranging from 600 to 1,200 square feet. The rents are likely to be in the high-$50s to low-$60s per square foot, Mr. Brause said.

The amenity package is extensive, from a landscaped serenity courtyard, to a fitness center and movement studio, to a recreational courtyard that links to the two buildings and has a V-shaped pool with a 50-foot lap lane, to a grilling and bar area with communal seating and grass that looks onto a large weather-resistant movie screen. In total, the project will have more than 8,300 square feet of indoor amenity space and nearly 17,000 square feet of outdoor amenity space.

Mr. Rodriguez noted that the design and development teams “wanted to do something that was unique to the neighborhood, something that spoke to the newness and to the [spunk] and reality of the past.” In addition, he said, “We tried to make sure there’s a little bit of everything [in terms of amenities] for everyone.”

Facade materials will include “rougher metal,” Mr. Rodriguez said, as well as glass.

"The aesthetic of the project will combine the gritty industrial feel and history of Long Island City with the modern luxuries of a state-of-the-art residential building,” according to a press release the developers issued about the ground-breaking on April 22. Completion is expected in two years, Mr. Brause said.

“Too many buildings, particularly on the waterfront, are out of character with the neighborhood and look like they could be in Miami,” Mr. Brause said. “Instead of wiping out its industrial past, we embraced it.”


Lobby



Amenity lounge to courtyard at 44-28 Purveys Street (Rendering: FXFOWLE Architects)
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  #126  
Old Posted May 6, 2015, 6:29 PM
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New York/ 550 Fourth Avenue/ FT/ 11 FL

550 Fourth Avenue


550 4th Avenue, rendering by RoArt

REBECCA BAIRD-REMBA
MAY 6, 2015

Quote:
Boaz Gilad’s Brookland Capital is one of the most prolific small condo developers in Brooklyn, with projects under construction from the Williamsburg waterfront all the way down to East Flatbush. Now they’ve ventured away from Bed Stuy and Crown Heights and into more established condo territory with a development at 15th Street and 4th Avenue in Park Slope.

Plans filed in December say the building at 550 4th Avenue will rise 11 stories with 30 apartments, but Gilad tells YIMBY it will have 38 units. Based on the filing, those 30 apartments would be spread across 31,859 square feet of residential space, averaging out to fairly spacious units at 1,061 square feet a piece.

Chelsea- and Bed Stuy-based firm RoArt dreamed up the rendering, and Feingold and Gregory Architects, headquartered on the Upper West Side, are the architects of record.

This design is definitely a cut above the average PTAC-covered, cast concrete building on Fourth Avenue. The glassy tower sits atop a 5,000-square-foot retail base with two commercial spaces. Staggered balconies and a setback beginning at the eighth floor help break up the building’s mass, and the varying blocks of windows add a bit of flair.

Apartments will begin on the second floor, which will have three units, followed by four each on the fourth through seventh floors, two on the ninth and tenth floors, and then an eleventh-story penthouse. Amenities will include a gym in the cellar, storage, and an 870-square-foot terrace on the second floor.

The building will replace a supermarket on the corner of Fourth Avenue and two three-story frame houses on 15th Street, but the DOB hasn’t approved demo permits yet. Brookland picked up the three lots, which total just over 7,000 square feet, for $3,100,000 last year.

Zoning here is pretty favorable, because it requires active uses on the ground floor (either commercial or community facilities) and waives parking for properties smaller than 10,000 square feet, like this one.
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  #127  
Old Posted May 6, 2015, 9:49 PM
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Thanks for the update, and keeping with the format on the 1st page sparkling.

44-28 Purves Street is amazing.
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  #128  
Old Posted May 6, 2015, 10:04 PM
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Update on 100 Varick Street:

Note: Could be found on post #8 in the 1st page. Just a brief sentence since it was very preliminary. Now we know that Renzo Piano will be designing it.


Quote:
Renzo Piano’s versatility continues to win the hearts of NYC developers, and it looks like the starchitect is finally getting his chance to flex his muscle in the residential realm. The Post reports that Piano—who just cut the ribbon to the new Whitney to rave reviews—has been chosen by Michael Shvo and Bizzi & Partners to design a brand new 290-foot tower at 100 Varick Street in up-and-coming Hudson Square bordering Soho.


Current Site:



=============================
http://www.6sqft.com/new-renzo-piano...hudson-square/
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  #129  
Old Posted May 8, 2015, 9:21 PM
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Smile NEW YORK | 1647-1651 1st Avenue | FT | 15 FLOORS

Project: 1647-1651 1st Avenue

Note: Will make a reference to this post once a rendering is out

Quote:
Marin Management Corp. has filed applications at 1647-1651 1st Avenue, in Yorkville, for a 15-story, 38-unit mixed-use building measuring nearly 59,500 square feet. The retail component will take up 1,780 square feet, and DJ Associates Architect is designing. The assemblage includes three four- and five-story tenement buildings on the corner of East 86th Street, and demolition permits have not been filed yet.
What will be replaced with a 15 floor tower:


===================================
http://www.yimbynews.com/2015/05/15-...yorkville.html
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  #130  
Old Posted May 10, 2015, 1:34 AM
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From Yesterday

3 WTC


World Trade Center Hub , 1, 3, 4 , 7 in Lower Manhattan,New York
by Corey Best, on Flickr

30 Park Place


Manhattan Rising - 30 Park Place
by Corey Best, on Flickr

56 Leonard Street


Manhattan Rising - 56 Leonard Street
by Corey Best, on Flickr


Manhattan Rising - 56 Leonard Street
by Corey Best, on Flickr

10 Hudson Yards


Smoggy Midtown Skyline
by Corey Best, on Flickr

WTC Hub

Quote:
So yesterday I was at the WTC taking some photos of the New train station that had opened on Wednesday. I wasn't there for more then 30 seconds when the guard approached me pointing a Flash light and yelling at me to stop taking photographs... I had read a Hudson reporter article saying that it was legal to do so , which I told him. He said I had to delete my photos , I told I wasn't.... After a few more minutes oh arguing with him over it , he decides to give up and walk away. But as he was walking he said something threatening , I couldn't make it out...but I decided to call him out on it...which I realize was a mistake... He comes back over even more aggressive then the first time. I then ask for his name so I could report him , he refuses...so I go to take his photograph and he tries to reach for my camera. I decided to leave the station not wanting to escalate things further and on my way up I spoke with a staffer about the rules...Which he seemed unsure of...

During this whole time , numerous other people were taking photos with there phones....I guess because I had the big DSLR I drew attention to myself. But over the last few days 100s of photos of the station have been taken... I didn't delete the photos if your wondering I uploaded them to my Flickr... I know the PA had a Photography ban in the past , but over the last few years it has been quietly removed... I do hear of people being harassed in the Aviation & Bridge community from time to time...by Security Guards.. I don't spend much time at PA facilities aside from the WTC... I never saw any signs on the PATH , only a few at the Bus Terminal which were removed last year...and a few on the Bridges which were removed from what ive heard.

The Article where it says it legal http://www.hudsonreporter.com/view/f...ideographers-?
I did manage to take a few photos before I was yelled at...


069
by Corey Best, on Flickr


PATH - World Trade Center Station in Lower Manhattan
by Corey Best, on Flickr


PATH - World Trade Center Station in Lower Manhattan
by Corey Best, on Flickr


PATH - World Trade Center Station in Lower Manhattan
by Corey Best, on Flickr

The Outside...


World Trade Center Hub , 1 ,3 in Lower Manhattan,New York
by Corey Best, on Flickr


World Trade Center Hub , 1 , 7 in Lower Manhattan,New York
by Corey Best, on Flickr
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  #131  
Old Posted May 10, 2015, 12:44 PM
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As of now, New York has 80 buildings over 200m (com, t/o, u/c)! If we add prep and pro buildings, the city is at 135.
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  #132  
Old Posted May 11, 2015, 4:02 PM
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New York/ 111 Varick St /FT / 15 FL

Madigan putting up 15-story apartment building in Soho
New development slated to have 49 resi units and ground-floor retail

May 11, 2015
Tess Hofmann

Quote:


Madigan Development is moving forward with plans to bring a 49-unit, 15-story apartment building to 111 Varick Street in Soho, according to a permit application filed with the city’s Department of Buildings Monday.

The building will span 62,600 square feet and include ground-floor retail and apartments on the fourth through 15th floors. It is unknown if the apartments will be rentals or condominiums. A six-story parking garage, located at the corner of Broome and Varick streets, currently occupies the site.

Madigan is a Midtown-based developer led by Lou Madigan, who was not immediately available to comment.

The Stephen B. Jacobs Group is serving as the architect of record, the filings show. - See more at: http://therealdeal.com/blog/2015/05/....dhQyIOjZ.dpuf
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  #133  
Old Posted May 11, 2015, 8:55 PM
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Just how impressive is New York City’s super-tall building boom? (by roof height)

New York City has always had the most skyscrapers in the nation, but Chicago has always had a legitimate claim to the crown in terms of height. Especially after the loss of the twin towers in 2001, Big Shoulders has had the clear height advantage. Even a decade after 9/11, New York City had only one thousand-footer (by roof height, not spire height) blocking the sun, whereas Chicago had four!

So the current super-tall boom in NYC is not just interesting in terms of what it means for New York City, but also what it means for Chicago. No one knows how long the boom will last; no one knows how many more super-talls will yet be announced; no one knows how long NYC’s boom will go unmatched in Chicago and in the rest of the nation. But what’s clear at this point is that New York City is so vastly far ahead in terms of construction and firm proposals that no domestic city will rival it for decades. It’s not just that NYC has re-gained the crown, it’s that we can’t even call it a competition anymore.

Sure, Chicago might build Wanda Vista and 625 West Monroe and maybe a couple other super-talls by the mid-2020s, but that’s child's play compared to what's on the drawing board for New York City over the same time period. And yes, Houston has lots of square footage under construction, but where’s the height? And of course I'm aware that Miami, San Francisco and Philly have 900+ footers under construction, which is great, but just one each per city currently. And yes there are a lot of proposals out there nationwide, especially in Miami, but nothing like in New York.

So here's the deal: A domestic super-tall market-share blowout is underway, and I think even most people who pay attention to skyscraper development haven't fully grasped how big New York's share is going to get. I've pulled together some data to highlight the changes on the way:

Lest someone (like me!) complain that buildings like One World Trade and BofA and NYTimes are artificially tall due to their spires, without truly impacting the skyline, all the data below uses building roof heights, not spire heights.


In December 2012, more than a decade after 9/11:
• New York City had one completed tower over 1,000 feet: The Empire State Building
• New York City had only one of the nation’s ten tallest towers; Chicago had five, including the tallest, Willis Tower
• New York City had 14 of the nation’s 50 tallest towers; Chicago had 13.
• A roof height of 787 feet was enough to make the nation’s top 50.


As we all know, things are changing. Two and a half years later, in May 2015:
• New York City has three completed towers over 1,000 feet: One Word Trade, The ESB, One57
• New York City has three of the nation’s top ten tallest towers; Chicago has four
• New York City has 17 of the nation’s 50 tallest towers; Chicago has 13.
• A roof height of 792 feet is enough to make the nation’s top 50.


But what’s underway is truly transformative. Currently under construction, as of May 2015:
• There are currently seven towers over 1,000 feet under construction nationwide. Five of those towers are in New York City (the others are in San Francisco and Philly). The five in NYC are Nordstrom, 532 Park, 30 Hudson Yards, Three World Trade, 53w53


When all towers of all heights that are currently under construction nationwide are completed:
• New York City will have six of the nation’s ten tallest towers; Chicago will have four; (Miami will have none.)
• New York City will have 21 of the nation’s 50 tallest towers; Chicago will have ten; (Miami will have one.) So in the seven years from 2012-2019, NYC will go from having essentially the same share of the top 50 as Chicago had in 2012 to having double Chicago’s share by around 2019.
• A roof height of 852 will be needed to make the nation’s top 50.


There are currently 25 1000+ footers proposed nationwide that have not yet officially started construction. If all of them are built, there would be a total of 41 towers nationwide that are at least 1,000 feet tall.
• 14 of the proposed 1,000-footers are intended for New York City; just 3 for Chicago; and an impressive 4 for Miami.
• If all currently proposed towers are built nationwide, there would be a total of 41 towers nationwide that are at least 1,000 feet tall. A staggering 22 of those towers would be in New York City, with only 7 in Chicago and 4 in Miami. New York City would go from having a fourth of the number of Chicago’s super-talls in 2012 (one as compared to four), to having three times the number of Chicago’s super-talls by some point in the early 2020s (22 as compared to seven). Yes that presumes a lot, because not all proposals will be built, and meanwhile other proposals would occur. But at this point does anyone think that if the economy is good enough in Chicago to result in additional super-tall proposals, that it won't be good enough in New York for the boom to continue as well?
• In the early 2020s, if indeed the current crop of proposals gets built, New York City would account for eight or nine of the ten tallest towers nationwide; Chicago for just one, and possibly Seattle for one (depending on the height of 820 Second Avenue)
• New York City would account for half (25) of the nation’s fifty tallest buildings; Chicago would account for seven; Miami would account for five.
• A roof height of 974 feet would be needed to crack the nation’s top 50. That building would be Philadelphia’s Comcast Tower, which is currently the nation’s 12th tallest tower (by roof height). The Bank of America Tower in New York City, which has a roof height of 945 feet and is currently the fifth tallest tower in New York City by roof height, would not even be in the nation’s top 50, and would not be in NYC’s top 25.

Last edited by intheburg; May 12, 2015 at 12:50 AM. Reason: mistake in the number of Chicago supertalls by roof a decade after 9/11: it was four, not five
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  #134  
Old Posted May 11, 2015, 9:14 PM
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It's impressive but it's New York, it's a miracle that New York didn't have more supertalls before Chicago.

Miami will lose those supertall proposal's due to the faa
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  #135  
Old Posted May 11, 2015, 10:01 PM
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Yea unfortunately Miami seems bound to have a lot of 900 footers. FAA has a tantrum for anything over 1000 feet. In the past, proposals have been 1,100 feet, but often cut. What we may wind up seeing is one or two supertall just slide by. But a positive for Miami is the number of 700+ footers in the pipeline. Its impressive for a city of less than 600,000. Capital Brickell Towers site also promises the tallest project in the cities history according to China Construction Corp.. Thats what they say, but lets see once the FAA see's it.

As for NYC, I credit much of the boom to Bloomberg's policies and pro-business attitude. He was a good mayor I feel, and set the stage through his rezonings for future growth. Not just in Manhattan, but Brooklyn and Queens. Either way, today is a historical day as Nordstrom will dethrone WTC1, and good too.

Lastly,

intheburg , awesome first post. Thanks for contributing.

Feel free in the future to add projects. I only ask that you order it according to the first page format and neatly. Example, title, double check that its not added in any of the pages, and use quotes, source underneath.
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  #136  
Old Posted May 12, 2015, 12:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchymunch View Post

Miami will lose those supertall proposal's due to the faa
Sad, but even if 900 footers, Miami is going to be much more similar to Chicago than Chicago to NYC in terms of the top 50. It's an extraordinary re-distribution of skyline height in a decade's time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris08876

As for NYC, I credit much of the boom to Bloomberg's policies and pro-business attitude. He was a good mayor I feel, and set the stage through his rezonings for future growth
I agree. Construction is a lagging indicator; the current boom is like light from the nearest stars--what we see now happened five or ten years ago.
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  #137  
Old Posted May 12, 2015, 12:13 AM
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Chicago never had 5 supertalls to the roof. It has 4: Sears, Trump, Aon, JHC.

Anway, good post intheburg. You can gather more information on the New York supertall thread which gets updated on a daily basis.
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  #138  
Old Posted May 12, 2015, 12:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunser View Post
Chicago never had 5 supertalls to the roof. It has 4: Sears, Trump, Aon, JHC.
Doh! Thanks so much for the catch! I think I must have included Franklin Center, which of course needs its antennas to feign super-tall stature. I'll correct my post!
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  #139  
Old Posted May 12, 2015, 1:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by intheburg View Post
Doh! Thanks so much for the catch! I think I must have included Franklin Center, which of course needs its antennas to feign super-tall stature. I'll correct my post!
625 west monroe also has a very slim chance of happening....
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  #140  
Old Posted May 13, 2015, 9:50 AM
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Smile NEW YORK | 302 East 96th Street | 210 FT | 21 FLOORS

Project: 302 East 96th Street

What will be replaced:



Quote:
A condo tower designed by Karl Fischer is headed for the Upper East Side, at 302 East 96th Street between First and Second Avenues.

The architect filed a new building application this morning for a 21-story apartment building, which will replace a three-story garage. The 210-foot tall tower will host 48 apartments spread across 60,309 square feet of residential space, for an average apartment of 1,256 square feet.

Apartments will begin on the second floor, with one unit, followed by three units each on floors three through 15, two a piece on floors 17 and 18 and only one per floor on the top three stories.

An eight-space garage will take up most of the ground floor, and residents will be able to take advantage of indoor and outdoor recreation space on the second floor. The building will also have a roof deck.
==========================
http://therealdeal.com/blog/2015/03/...ct-on-the-ues/
http://www.yimbynews.com/2015/05/per...east-side.html
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