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  #261  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2019, 2:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Chicago has an Orthodox corridor in West Rogers Park (though I think most Orthodox are in North Shore burbs now).
the orthodox are still mostly concentrated in west rogers/lincolnwood/skokie.

north shore burbs like highland park & northbrook are primarily reform/conservative.
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  #262  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2019, 12:23 AM
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Originally Posted by dc_denizen View Post
The immediate downtown of San Diego and Miami is similar, but that’s it

Miami grew as vacation and retirement community with a very master planned character. It has far fewer historic nodes with walkable businesses than places like San Diego or Los Angeles. Retail is all about strip malls and power centers, with gridded suburbs and not much else

Miami lacks real beach towns. The drive from Carlsbad through La Jolla and mission beach is down to downtown San Diego is nothing like the drive south from say lake worth to dt Miami Beach . Many more walkable pedestrian areas in the case of San Diego
Miami lacks real beach towns? Probably, since Miami Beach is its own city. But the distance between both are probably closer than the distance between La Jolla and Downtown San Diego and about the same distance between the later and Coronado Island.

And Miami isn’t master-planned. It annexed a few places and lost some, similar to how LA grew.

The walkability of both areas are about the same if you consider setting both metros to scale. Southern California’s urban coast is continuous from Santa Monica to San Clemente then from Oceanside to Imperial Beach with a significant gap. South Florida’s urban coast is uninterrupted from Jupiter to Key Biscayne. Beach towns cover both.


And yeah, not much similarities between SD and Miami than what I mentioned. Both are pretty awesome and have great weather ( I like humidity as much as moderate weather).
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  #263  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2019, 5:49 AM
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I have always thought that Detroit, Denver, Portland and LA are cities that have similar urban DNA to Minneapolis but all in different ways. Detroit and Minneapolis were very similar in urban form and architecture in the first half of the 20th century and then went in radically different directions after WWII.

If you are going to compare LA to a Midwestern city Minneapolis probably works as well as Detroit. LA and the Twin Cities are both multi-nodal metros with downtowns that are large but not culturally dominant. They are both products of prewar 20th century booms and are full of relatively dense streetcar suburbia, there are miles of bungalows and craftsman houses in both. The freeways are laid out in grids rather than the hub and spokes of most metros. The chain of lakes is the Minneapolis analog to the Pacific beaches. Both are relatively walkable for 20th century cities but are full of people who drive. Both have lots of stucco. The older parts of LA really give the impression that it started out as a Midwestern city on the Pacific and only became the modern LA after WWII. The main differences between LA, Minneapolis and Detroit seem to be their arcs after WWII - LA went on to become a megacity that was heavily influenced by Latin America, Minneapolis remained a healthy mid sized metro while Detroit boomed hard and then crashed.

Lake Street is the main east/west commercial street in south Minneapolis, here are a few different sections of it:

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9484...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9483...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9483...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9483...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9483...7i13312!8i6656

Some residential sections of south Minneapolis, this part reminds me of some of the parts of Detroit that are mostly gone now:

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9444...7i13312!8i6656

Prairie School for yuppies:

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9568...7i13312!8i6656

More Prairie School and bungalows:

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9384...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9290...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9281...7i13312!8i6656

Last edited by Chef; Aug 29, 2019 at 6:35 AM.
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  #264  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2019, 2:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Chef View Post
I have always thought that Detroit, Denver, Portland and LA are cities that have similar urban DNA to Minneapolis but all in different ways. Detroit and Minneapolis were very similar in urban form and architecture in the first half of the 20th century and then went in radically different directions after WWII.

If you are going to compare LA to a Midwestern city Minneapolis probably works as well as Detroit. LA and the Twin Cities are both multi-nodal metros with downtowns that are large but not culturally dominant. They are both products of prewar 20th century booms and are full of relatively dense streetcar suburbia, there are miles of bungalows and craftsman houses in both. The freeways are laid out in grids rather than the hub and spokes of most metros. The chain of lakes is the Minneapolis analog to the Pacific beaches. Both are relatively walkable for 20th century cities but are full of people who drive. Both have lots of stucco. The older parts of LA really give the impression that it started out as a Midwestern city on the Pacific and only became the modern LA after WWII. The main differences between LA, Minneapolis and Detroit seem to be their arcs after WWII - LA went on to become a megacity that was heavily influenced by Latin America, Minneapolis remained a healthy mid sized metro while Detroit boomed hard and then crashed.
Definitely agree that there are many structural similarities between Minneapolis and Detroit. Minneapolis has a bigger downtown, and it is filled with towers that are relatively new, versus Detroit's mostly prewar skyline. Detroit had a much bigger buffer area of densely populated neighborhoods surrounding downtown, though.

I see some similarities between Minneapolis and Austin, too. Both have a large growing downtown area that is eating up the lower density areas right around it.
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  #265  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2019, 7:51 PM
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I always thought that Houston was a lesser Los Angeles. If you look at the sprawl, freeways, near bodies of water, prone to natural disasters, full of people from eveywhere, and even similar skylines.


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  #266  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2019, 8:43 PM
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Today's Houston is what Los Angeles was in the 80s--a large, established city with a thriving corporate-based economy still trying to form its own civic identity. I wish people would stop driving the narrative that LA's nothing but a city full of transplants from east of the Mississippi. The Latinos, Asians, Armenians, and Persians (all racial/ethnic minorities) really don't have any generational connections with the Eastern US, and they're the ones that seem to exude the most civic pride.
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  #267  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2019, 8:54 PM
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Yeah, LA reminded me of where Houston in 20-30 years; more established, denser and a stronger sense of identity. The only difference is as long as Houston remains affordable, it will remain transient where as people are less apt to move to LA and 'wing it'. Far too expensive.
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  #268  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2019, 9:41 PM
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I've said this before, but Houston and Detroit seem to share a lot of traits. . . flat, spread out with sleepy central business districts, poor public transit options, overly reliant on one industry sector. . . I'm sure there will be blowback, but that's my humble opinion. . .

. . .
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  #269  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 1:40 AM
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seattle and denver seem alike in many ways, mostly the scale of the csas. the front range and the seattle corridor along I5 are similar. long and constrained by a natural barrier. i know one is cowboys and the other is coffee but they both have the mountainy vibe.
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  #270  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 2:47 AM
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Originally Posted by pdxtex View Post
seattle and denver seem alike in many ways, mostly the scale of the csas. the front range and the seattle corridor along I5 are similar. long and constrained by a natural barrier. i know one is cowboys and the other is coffee but they both have the mountainy vibe.
I’d agree with that along those lines but the climates are very different, and while Seattle is one of the most maritime cities in the US Denver is one of the driest with very little water. That being said there is a distinct West Coast vibe in Denver that doesn’t exist any other city outside of the West Coast. Denver is West Coast outdoorsy meets Great Plains cowboy culture.
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  #271  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 3:15 AM
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i was just thinking built form. yeah, no weather similarity at all though, i agree. one is in a rainshadow, the other is a rain magnet....
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  #272  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 6:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Tom In Chicago View Post
I've said this before, but Houston and Detroit seem to share a lot of traits. . . flat, spread out with sleepy central business districts, poor public transit options, overly reliant on one industry sector. . . I'm sure there will be blowback, but that's my humble opinion. . .

. . .
I can see that. Houston is what Detroit could have been but more urbanized if it had stayed stable during its economic downturn.
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  #273  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 2:13 PM
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Houston and LA comparisons will never make sense, unless you're just talking the newer downtown skylines. I don't see anything in Houston that looks like LA neighborhoods, and when people post google maps, it just makes less similar. I don't see this changing in 30-50 years, because Houston (or any Sunbelt city) doesn't have the prewar commerical streets/neighborhoods LA has. Nothing wrong with that, just makes little sense.


Houston resembles Orange County more than LA.
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  #274  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 3:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Tom In Chicago View Post
I've said this before, but Houston and Detroit seem to share a lot of traits. . . flat, spread out with sleepy central business districts, poor public transit options, overly reliant on one industry sector. . . I'm sure there will be blowback, but that's my humble opinion. . .

. . .
Houston was Detroit in Robocop.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/26897917@N02/12223595134
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  #275  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 5:10 PM
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I rest my case

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  #276  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 6:14 PM
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Never been to Houston, so I can't make that comparison. But RoboCop's Detroit looked nothing like the actual Detroit.
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  #277  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2019, 10:50 PM
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Houston and LA comparisons will never make sense, unless you're just talking the newer downtown skylines. I don't see anything in Houston that looks like LA neighborhoods, and when people post google maps, it just makes less similar. I don't see this changing in 30-50 years, because Houston (or any Sunbelt city) doesn't have the prewar commerical streets/neighborhoods LA has. Nothing wrong with that, just makes little sense.


Houston resembles Orange County more than LA.
It terms of newness, better freeway network than LA County, Irvine midrise nodes, I would say yes.

However, Orange County culture, population demographics, population density, income, congestion, terrain, climate, close proximity to a major city -- no comparison.
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  #278  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2019, 9:12 PM
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Another more obscure comparison that might leave some bewildered: LA and London.

In the sense that both have a lot of uniform (relatively) medium-level density spread out over a large area (Greater London is a little over 600 square miles). Obviously Outer London was developed and is still oriented around a dense railroad network, and much of it resembles a West Philly vernacular (only without the gridded streets) of wall-to-wall two-story rowhouses lining narrow streets. That's something that simply doesn't exist in LA. But there's a parallel in the sense that these neighborhoods are mostly blocks and blocks of quiet residential streets anchored by a high street activity center. It reminds me a lot of outer Queens (urban form with a bit of a suburban quality), which funny enough, I've compared to LA in the past.
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  #279  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2019, 9:17 PM
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London and LA correspond in the sense that, upon becoming great cities, they both launched new models of urban form characterized by lower density. But in reality, London is Big Boston.
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  #280  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2019, 9:23 PM
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London and LA correspond in the sense that, upon becoming great cities, they both launched new models of urban form characterized by lower density. But in reality, London is Big Boston.
Excluding Back Bay, Boston -- which was designed and inspired by things in Paris.

Ex: Haussmann's renovation of Paris

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Haussmann's renovation of Paris was a vast public works program commissioned by Emperor Napoléon III and directed by his prefect of the Seine, Georges-Eugène Haussmann, between 1853 and 1870. It included the demolition of medieval neighborhoods that were deemed overcrowded and unhealthy by officials at the time; the building of wide avenues; new parks and squares; the annexation of the suburbs surrounding Paris; and the construction of new sewers, fountains and aqueducts. Haussmann's work was met with fierce opposition, and he was finally dismissed by Napoleon III in 1870; but work on his projects continued until 1927. The street plan and distinctive appearance of the center of Paris today is largely the result of Haussmann's renovation.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haussm...ation_of_Paris
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