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  #201  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2008, 4:16 PM
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Hate all ya want...I'd kill to have this proposal. Limestone cladding? Y'alls fukin' high.

Put me in the "lovin' it" category too.
     
     
  #202  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2008, 5:49 PM
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I think some of my fellow New Yorkers are getting spoiled. Don't be so quick to forget that 5 years ago something like this (and many other current proposals/ constructions) would be viewed as an illusion.

It seems to me thought that the 900-1000 footer is becoming the new 700 footer.
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  #203  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2008, 10:46 PM
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Hate all ya want...I'd kill to have this proposal. Limestone cladding? Y'alls fukin' high.

Put me in the "lovin' it" category too.
Me too. Imagine: a modern skyscraper NOT built as cheaply as possible!
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  #204  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2008, 11:22 PM
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downtownexpress.com

Four Seasons says Downtown’s time is now

By Julie Shapiro

Luxury amenities Downtown are nothing new. From Tiffany to Hermes, high-end retailers are flocking to the rapidly developing district.

But the excitement was palpable when developer Larry Silverstein announced the latest arrival to Downtown’s luxury economy: Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts.

Four Seasons will run a 175-room hotel and 143 condominiums in a brand-new tower at 99 Church St. The first 22 stories of the 80-story building will house the hotel, including a restaurant, lounge, spa and pool. Luxury condos will fill the rest of the building and will feature penthouses, terraces and the residents’ own fitness center.

“Four Seasons’ decision to join in the transformation of Downtown is a huge sign of change,” said Silverstein, president and C.E.O. of Silverstein Properties. “But it’s also a vote of confidence in Downtown’s historic role as a world-class business district.”

At 912 feet, the trim tower between Barclay St. and Park Place will be the tallest residential building in Manhattan. Construction is scheduled to start this June and finish in 2011. Silverstein unveiled the designs and announced his partnership with international chain Four Seasons at a Downtown-Lower Manhattan Association breakfast Tuesday.

“We knew it was the right time for a second Four Seasons in New York,” said Kathleen Taylor, president and chief operating officer of Four Seasons. The city’s other Four Seasons, on 57th St. in Midtown, just completed its most successful year yet, which bodes well for an expansion, Taylor said.

The slim limestone and cast-stone tower has a more classical look than the skyscrapers that will rise at ground zero, and that’s exactly what architect Robert A.M. Stern was going for. He was wary of overshadowing the adjacent Woolworth Building, which he called “a great icon” after the breakfast. Stern wanted 99 Church to complement Woolworth rather than dominate it.

To that end, he envisioned a light-colored tower “as slender as it is structurally feasible,” with large rectangular windows.

Stern said he hopes to distinguish 99 Church St. from the bulkier World Trade Center office buildings, which Silverstein is also developing.

“This is a place people will live,” Stern told reporters. “It should be elegant.”

Stern’s projects include 15 Central Park West, Tribeca Park and Tribeca Green in Lower Manhattan, and the new Museum for African Art.

Since October, Silverstein has been demolishing the previous 11-story building at 99 Church St., which housed the headquarters of Moody’s Corporation. The bond raters moved a block away to Silverstein’s 7 W.T.C. Once completed, the 99 Church St. lot will feature a public plaza connecting Barclay St. to Park Place.

Liz Berger, president of the Downtown Alliance, is thrilled with Four Seasons’ arrival.

“It’s fantastic,” she said. “Who doesn’t like Four Seasons?”

Hotel rooms are in high demand Downtown, and developers are stepping in to meet that need. This January, the Alliance counted 2,474 hotel rooms in Lower Manhattan, with an additional 3,702 announced or under construction.

Several hotels are slated to open Downtown in 2008, including Wyndham Garden at 20 Maiden Lane, a 20-story building with 110 rooms. Across from the World Trade Center site, W Hotels will launch a 220-room hotel at 123 Washington St. later this year.

Julie Menin, chairperson of Community Board 1, agreed with Berger that the Four Seasons hotel is good news for Downtown. Once the 9/11 memorial opens, 5 million tourists will visit ground zero each year, and Menin doesn’t want them to leave the neighborhood after only a few hours.

“We want them to dine in the restaurants and shop in the stores,” she said. “If they stay in [a hotel in] Lower Manhattan, they’re more apt to do that.”

Today’s uncertain economic climate made several appearances during Silverstein’s remarks. He mentioned the naysayers who cast doubt over the rebuilding of Lower Manhattan, doubts he said which were largely silenced after 7 W.T.C.’s construction and opening. With a possible recession on the horizon, “The naysayers will be back,” Silverstein told the audience. “And once again, all of us in this room will prove them wrong.”

Even if Wall St. suffers, Silverstein said he is not worried about diminished demand for office space in the three towers he is going to build at the World Trade Center. That’s because 86 percent of his tenants in the new 7 W.T.C. are outside of the financial industry, a pattern he believes can continue when the three buildings are built.


Later, in response to a question about the budget problems at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s Fulton St. hub, Silverstein reaffirmed that no matter the financial climate, steel will rise on his properties. His advantage is in the $4.5 billion in insurance money he has from 9/11, in addition to tax-free Liberty Bonds, he said.

“That puts us in a unique position and gives us the ability to build these buildings,” Silverstein said.

Silverstein also fielded a question from C.B. 1’s Michael Connolly on the performing arts center at the W.T.C. site. The Frank Gehry-designed building will include a 1,000-seat theater and possibly other performance spaces, Silverstein said. Silverstein assured the audience that Mayor Michael Bloomberg is behind the performing arts center and that he will help raise money for it, just as he successfully raised money for the memorial museum. Silverstein expects the arts center to be complete in 2011 or 2012.

“It will be a magnificent building because [Gehry] only designs magnificent buildings,” he added.


At the end of Silverstein’s speech, an audience member asked about luxury amenities for condo owners at 99 Church and jokingly wondered if he should buy one.

“Buy the apartment,” Silverstein advised, laughing. “They’re going fast!”
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  #205  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2008, 11:26 PM
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I love the sleek all-glass towers that are being built everywhere, but it's nice to see something else pop up too. I really like the look of this one.
     
     
  #206  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 5:44 AM
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Good to know we have an architect who understands traditions of class and does not necessarily subscribe to "bigger, flashier and 'avant-garte' is always better."
     
     
  #207  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 2:37 PM
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FEBRUARY 5, 2008

So excited by the new renderings and the prospect of the Four Seasons coming Downtown,
New Yorkers stormed Park Place (& the Woolworth Bldg.) to watch the demolition in person.
Oh, and there was some sort of parade going on...

1.


2.


3.


4.


5.


6.


7.


8.


9.




They should release more renderings in NY if its gonna generate turnouts like this...
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  #208  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 5:36 PM
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So you went to the parade instead of working?
     
     
  #209  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 5:45 PM
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Giants, hell yes.
     
     
  #210  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 7:04 PM
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Been a fan since the LT days so...
     
     
  #211  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 10:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYguy View Post
FEBRUARY 5, 2008

So excited by the new renderings and the prospect of the Four Seasons coming Downtown,
New Yorkers stormed Park Place (& the Woolworth Bldg.) to watch the demolition in person.
Oh, and there was some sort of parade going on...
My job is to help clarify things for Daquan.

The crowds you see in the pics were not there to see any building's demolition. They were actually there to see the NY giants parade because they won the super bowl last week. The Super Bowl is the biggest sporting event in the U.S.. Football is the sport.
     
     
  #212  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2008, 1:26 PM
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Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
So you went to the parade instead of working?
I think half the people at the parade were skipping work or school. I felt bad for the people actually trying to get to work through that crowd. But you know, its been nearly 8 years since the city had a tickertape parade, so everyone was excused.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lakegz
My job is to help clarify things for Daquan.
Haven't seen Daquan around here in a while.
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  #213  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2008, 1:32 PM
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http://downtownexpress.com/de_249/moodys.html

Moody’s rebuilds damaged ‘Credit’ at 7 W.T.C.

_


By Julie Shapiro

Whenever Joseph Svehlak walked past 99 Church St., the old headquarters
of Moody’s Corporation, he liked to look at the large metal sculpture above
the doorway. Called “Credit,” the rectangular piece featured symbols of
agriculture and industry in harmony.

“It was the focal point of the entrance to the building,” Svehlak said. “It
symbolized what Moody’s was about.”

Svehlak always pointed out the sculpture when he gave
tours of Lower Manhattan, but in mid-January, he noticed Credit was gone.
The entire Moody’s building is being demolished to make way for Silverstein
Properties’ high-rise Four Seasons hotel. Svehlak wondered, “What happened
to Credit?”

It turns out that Moody’s decided not to bring the plaque along to its new
headquarters in 7 World Trade Center, but instead created a smaller replica.
The replica, a shinier gold color than the weathered original, is hanging in
Moody’s offices, which are not open to the public.

The original Credit is now long gone, removed and recycled by Waldorf
Demolition, a Silverstein spokesperson said.


Svehlak, a preservationist, was sad to hear the news.

“Redevelopment is good for the economy, but wasn’t there a way that the
wonderful grand plaque could have been reused in the new building instead of
being destroyed?” Svehlak asked. “It’s another blow to Downtown.”

The metal sculpture, which Svehlak estimates as a 10 or 12-foot square,
featured a rifle-bearing frontiersman and a muscular industrial worker holding
hands, with trees, fields, a farmhouse and skyscrapers in the background.
Beneath the image is a quote from Daniel Webster on the importance of
credit. In an 1834 Senate speech, Webster called credit “the vital air of the
system of modern commerce.”

A Moody’s representative did not know who created Credit, but said he
thought the piece dated to the building’s 1951 construction. He also did not
say why Moody’s made a replica rather than moving the original.
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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
     
     
  #214  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2008, 2:37 AM
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^What a shame.
     
     
  #215  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2008, 2:42 AM
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Is it me or does the "replica" look like a photocopy of a photocopy? Know what I mean?
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  #216  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2008, 2:44 AM
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The replica lacks the power of the original - "Credit" looks more like Gilligan.
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  #217  
Old Posted Feb 10, 2008, 7:41 PM
nequidnimis nequidnimis is offline
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I wish it had a spire, like other great Art Deco skyscrapers...
     
     
  #218  
Old Posted Feb 10, 2008, 7:50 PM
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I'm fine with it not having a spire. Not only is this building not Art Deco, but some of the greatest Art Deco skyscrapers did not have spires and they worked out just fine.
     
     
  #219  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2008, 11:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Busy Bee View Post
Is it me or does the "replica" look like a photocopy of a photocopy? Know what I mean?

It does seem a little odd that they would want a replica. Seen better in the color photos on pages 19-20 of Larry Silverstein's presentation.
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  #220  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2008, 2:44 PM
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http://www.nysun.com/article/71282

At Home Among the Clouds

By FRANCIS MORRONE
February 14, 2008


New York is again reaching for the sky, as the city has perhaps not done since the 1920s. Developer Larry Silverstein recently announced that his forthcoming apartment building and hotel at 99 Church Street would be 912 feet high. That will make the Robert A.M. Stern-designed structure the tallest residential building in New York.

Until recently, all of the city's super-tall buildings have been office buildings. New Yorkers have never really lived all that high up in the air. The fabled penthouses of Park Avenue or Central Park West were ever only 300 or 400 feet high. By the standards of history and of many other places, that's pretty high up. But by the standards of Manhattan skyscrapers, a handful of which rise more than 1,000 feet, it's not much.

Today, the city's tallest residential building, in whole or in part, is the Trump World Tower (on First Avenue between 47th and 48th streets). At 861 feet, it has had that title since 2001 — before which it was held for 14 years by CitySpire (on 56th Street between Sixth and Seventh avenues), which is mixed-use with apartments in its higher reaches. The Trump Tower (Fifth Avenue at 56th Street), also mixed-use, reigned between 1983 and 1987, taking the top spot from the Waldorf Towers part of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. But while the Waldorf had permanent apartments, it was primarily a transient hotel. The highest all-residential building between 1926 and 2001 — an amazing run for such a title in New York City — was the 541-foot Ritz Tower, on 57th Street at Park Avenue.

The Ritz Tower was an "apartment hotel." Though they were for permanent and not transient residents, units in apartment hotels did not — or were not supposed to — have kitchen facilities. That exempted the buildings from the tenement house laws and certain fire regulations that applied to all apartment buildings. In fact, many apartment hotel units were built with serving pantries equipped with refrigerators, running water, and outlets to which electrical stoves could be attached. In 1926, as the Ritz Tower was being readied for occupancy, the press implicated it in a sweeping move by the state's Tenement House Commission to declare illegal many of the apartment hotels going up in the city. Arthur Brisbane, the former Hearst journalist who was the developer of the Ritz Tower, protested that his building was falsely implicated — that it contained but two kitchens on its 42 floors. One kitchen served the building's tenants. The other was in Brisbane's own duplex apartment. There the matter rested.

Brisbane hired Emery Roth to design the building. Roth, more than any other architect, pioneered the "mansions in the clouds" style of Manhattan living. He designed Central Park West classics such as the San Remo, the Eldorado, and the Majestic. Roth and Brisbane, however, had some difficulties getting the design of the Ritz Tower just to their liking, and brought in Thomas Hastings to contribute to the design. Hastings had been the partner of the late John Carrère, and their credits included the New York Public Library. Late in his career, Hastings grew interested in the design of tall buildings. (In fact, the firm of Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, which designed the Empire State Building, grew out of Carrère & Hastings.) Classical devices enliven the Ritz Tower's sleekly telescoping stepped-back masses, and the obelisk finials are highly reminiscent of those on Hastings's contemporaneous Standard Oil Building at 26 Broadway. There's also a definite Jazz Age quality to the Ritz Tower, reminding us that the jazziest part of the Jazz Age wasn't marked by Art Deco, but by an easygoing classicism.

Contrast its design with that of the Trump World Tower. Donald Trump's building was designed by the Polish architect Marta Rudzka. Outraged neighbors opposed its construction; they were particularly concerned about its tremendous height. I myself have been known to consider certain buildings as too tall. In the end, though, it's the quality of design that matters. Trump World Tower is very successful on its own terms. It's the terms that are problematic. Basically, the building is an undifferentiated dark glass mass, a shiny object meant to register as such — and as nothing more. Sustained viewing is not only unrewarding, but also psychologically jarring.

Mr. Stern can handle tremendous scale because he understands that good buildings are made of varied and sensibly interrelated units. It's an old-fashioned notion to be sure — the same as that which informs the Ritz Tower's design. It's why his 550-foot apartment building, 15 Central Park West, works so well. Its rhythmical fenestration, moldings, and varied roofline are the sorts of devices New York skyscraper architects, all the way through the Art Deco era, knew humanized their tall buildings. Let's be clear: It's not so much that a style becomes passé in architecture as that the purposes a style serves become passé. In this case, humanizing the tall building is the purpose that has become, for the most part, hopelessly unchic.

Perhaps the best thing about 15 Central Park West is its beautiful limestone exterior, which creates a pocket of warm, shimmering light that benefits all the buildings around it. Mr. Stern plans to use limestone again at 99 Church St., which Mr. Silverstein says will be completed in 2010. Just as some Turtle Bay residents were concerned that Trump World Tower would overwhelm the United Nations Secretariat Building, some have voiced concern that 99 Church Street will overpower the adjacent Woolworth Building. Given that three 1,000-foot-plus towers have been approved for the former World Trade Center site, I think the Woolworth Building will be overwhelmed anyway. And from the renderings, 99 Church Street — with its slender profile and subtle massing — could improve the ground zero towers by placing them in a sensible sequence with the Woolworth Building.

A worrisome thing about the present boom is that at least twice before in New York did flurries of super-tall buildings run smack into colossal economic meltdowns — think of the crash of 1929 and the fiscal crisis of the mid-1970s. But the histories of cities are full of surprises. Who just a few years ago had not ceded the tall-building sweepstakes to Hong Kong, Dubai, or Kuala Lumpur? Who just a few years ago didn't think that New Yorkers just weren't interested anymore? Well, apparently we are.

_____________________________________________

http://www.nysun.com/article/71293

Living the Highest Life


By BRADLEY HOPE
February 14, 2008

While New Yorkers who inhabit the penthouses atop the tallest residential buildings in Manhattan are members of an exclusive group, an even loftier rank exists: the owner of the top-floor penthouse in the city's tallest apartment building. The two men who now share this title are a managing director at the Blackstone Group, Chinh Chu, and a real estate investor, Dominick D'Alleva. Each owns a half-floor penthouse on the 90th floor of Trump World Tower.

But like so much in the world of real estate, this distinction can be fleeting. Donald Trump's 860-foot high-rise, at 845 United Nations Plaza at 47th Street, is about to be "trumped" by Larry Silverstein's new condominium-hotel at 99 Church St. The new tower, which is to stand at 912 feet and whose units will go on sale in a year, will include a 4,800-square-foot top-floor penthouse with 15-foot ceilings and outdoor space.

"It will be the superlative apartment in a superlative building," a senior managing director at Corcoran Sunshine, Daniel Cordeiro, said. The brokerage firm, which is marketing the building, floated a special balloon with a camera 900 feet above ground to take 360-degree photographs mimicking the penthouse's view.

From that vantage point, a resident can look down about 100 feet at the filigreed cornices of the Woolworth Building, nearly every bridge on the East and Hudson rivers, City Hall, the Empire State Building, and the Statue of Liberty. Brooklyn, Queens, New Jersey, and parts of Long Island are also visible.


Despite being bested by about five floors, Mr. Trump said in an interview that he wasn't worried about the competition. Mr. Silverstein's building "can't compete with Trump World Tower," he said. "It doesn't have the location, the United Nations. You can't compete with that. ... You can see out to the Hamptons."

Mr. Silverstein's building, between Park Place and Barclay Street, will have 80 floors. While that is fewer than Trump World Tower, developers use different systems for numbering floors, and Mr. Trump's building will be 52 feet shorter.

The architect Robert A.M. Stern is designing 99 Church St., including the terraces that will be featured in the 10 penthouses planned for the top eight floors of the building.

"This is not just some balcony," Mr. Stern said. "They are room-size spaces where you can dine and sit."


After reciting a few snippets of the 1937 hit "The Penthouse Serenade," Mr. Stern said the allure of living "at the top" is as old as New York's building boom.

"It's like standing on a great bow of a ship or the cabin of a plane," he said. "The city is at your feet. There is a whole romance to it." Membership to the clique of homeowners who look down on New York comes at a high price.

Last year, Blackstone's Mr. Chu top floor — and more than 10,000 square feet of the floor below it — of the bronze-tinted glass Trump World Tower, according to property records. Mr. D'Alleva paid about $13.5 million for a penthouse in 2006, the records show. If Mr. Silverstein's penthouses sell in the $7,000-a-square-foot range that similar properties in Mr. Trump's building fetch, the topmost penthouse could sell for nearly $37 million. Such a sum could be a stretch, however, as the average price a square foot in the financial district, where 99 Church St. is situated, was $1,106 in the fourth quarter of 2007, compared with $1,691 a square foot on the East Side, where the Trump tower stands, according to data from the real estate appraisal firm Miller Samuel.

Mr. Silverstein is building so high at 99 Church St. to make the project more economical. The developer is including a public park between his building and the Woolworth building as part of the project, which means the building's footprint can be just 20,000 square feet. To make it profitable, there must be more units to sell; the answer is to build tall.

"Since we're building a public space, the footprint is smaller," Mr. Silverstein said. "This necessitated a slender, very tall tower."
The development will include 143 luxury apartments, including the penthouses, atop a 22-story, five-star Four Seasons Hotel, he said.

Mr. Silverstein bought the 11-story office building from Moody's in partnership with the California State Teachers' Retirement System for $170 million in 2006. Marketing will begin in about a year and residents will be able to move in sometime in 2011. The building will play a role in the network of buildings the developer is constructing at the World Trade Center, providing meeting space and accommodation for people doing business downtown.

"I expect some people who work at the World Trade Center to live in the building," he said. "It would also not surprise me if foreign buyers would come and see this as a superb opportunity to live one block away from some of the most significant architecture in the city."
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Last edited by NYguy; Feb 14, 2008 at 2:58 PM.
     
     
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