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  #81  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2014, 2:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yuriandrade View Post
Detroit at US$ 44,800 GDP per capita is not as bad as people might think. For instance, above European capitals such as Berlin, Rome and Madrid
Berlin is the poorest and less productive big city in Germany.
Its GDP per capita is lower than the average the country, a rare fact. Even lower than the capital of southern european countries like Italy or Spain.
This shows how decentralized is Germany. Cities like Munich or Frankfurt have very high GDP per capita.

Detroit is not as bad as people think, the city has plenty of highly productive suburbs and it houses the HQ of some of the larger car brands in the world.
Its GDP per capita is lower than the average of the United States.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yuriandrade View Post
Napoli at US$ 23,000 per capita, has the lowest in Western Europe;
Naples GDP per capita could be a bit larger because you have use a very broad definition for the metropolitan area of this city.
The real size of Naples metropolitan area is more like 4 million inhabitants.

Anyway it is still among the poorest big cities in Western Europe.

Last edited by Minato Ku; Jan 27, 2014 at 5:04 PM.
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  #82  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2014, 4:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Minato Ku View Post
Detroit is not as bad as people think, the city has plenty of highly productive suburbs and it houses the HQ of some of the larger car brands in the world.
Its GDP per capita is lower than the average of the United State.
Yes, Detroit is not as poor as the stereotype.

The city proper is very poor for U.S. standards, but the suburban areas are generally prosperous, and indistinguishable from typical U.S. suburbia.
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  #83  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2014, 5:12 PM
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There's a huge difference between being hours from the open ocean, on a wide open deep-channel river, vs. being days from it.
of course there is. i was never attempting to argue otherwise. i was merely pointing out that the presence of a seaport does not automatically make a place "coastal" in the conventional sense.

i agree that great lakes ports are not "coastal" in the conventional sense. i also agree that portland, while not being directly on the coast of the ocean, is in the "close enough" range to be considered coastal in the conventional, if not literal, sense. i don't know where that line is exactly, though. i mean, is montreal coastal? it's a straight shot to the north atlantic down the st. lawrence. no locks or canals or anything like that, just a deep channel river for a hundred miles or so until you get to the gulf of st. lawrence. very gray. our universe often doesn't work in strict black and whites.



Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays View Post
The shipping industry treats Portland as coastal. One definition for that is "where do shipments trade modes for the ocean trip." Like from ship to train, or in reverse from barge to ship.
well, if the shipping industry defines coastal as "where do shipments trade modes for the ocean trip", then all of the sea ports on the great lakes would have to be considered coastal as well, because cargo is loaded onto ocean-going ships for the ocean trip at those ports.

however, "coastal" is more than just an obscure shipping industry definition in the minds of most people in america, and if one were to survey the nation, i would wager that the vast majority of americans would not consider any of the port cities on the great lakes to be "coastal". here are just a couple of reasons why:

1. geography. this one is the most obvious. the great lakes reach deep into the heart of the continent, so it just goes against all conventional wisdom to consider a place that's 1,000 miles from the nearest drop of salt water as "coastal".

2. freshwater. despite the great lakes being large enough to not be able to "see the other side", and thus can be expanded as large as one's imagination allows, there is something fundamentally different about the feeling and atmosphere of being on the shore of a great lake vs. the ocean. it must be the lack of salty air. whenever you get close to the ocean, you can always smell it. it's unmistakable. the great lakes are typically odorless (save for the occasional algal bloom or alewife die-off) and no matter how similar a great lake shoreline might resemble the coast of the ocean, i can always instantly tell the difference: no sea smell.

3. the nature of great lakes shipping. while the st. lawrence seaway and welland canal allow ocean-going cargo ships to visit great lakes ports, the locks and canals of the seaway limit the size of vessels to ~750' in length, considerably smaller than the standard size of today's mammoth ocean-going cargo ships. while smaller ocean-going ships do regularly visit great lakes ports, it's an extremely tiny proportion of the nation's international shipping, which mostly goes through traditional seaports on the ocean - places like LA, houston, new jersey, etc. the vast majority (>90%) of the commercial shipping on the great lakes is bulk goods (taconite, grain, coal, potash, stone, cement, liquid fuels, etc.) shipped from one great lakes port to another, often times on ships that are too big to fit through the seaway locks and thus are forever restricted to the waters of the great lakes. this sets up an interesting relationship where most of the lakers are actually bigger than the salties.


a great lake "laker" (a 1,000-footer restricted to the waters of the great lakes):

source: http://www.boatnerd.com/pictures/spe...ardgallery/08/



a great lake "salty" (an ocean-going ship small enough to fit through the locks of the seaway):

source: http://www.boatnerd.com/pictures/salty/Default.htm
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Last edited by Steely Dan; Jan 27, 2014 at 8:51 PM.
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  #84  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2014, 7:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato Ku View Post
Naples GDP per capita could be a bit larger because you have use a very broad definition for the metropolitan area of this city.
The real size of Naples metropolitan area is more like 4 million inhabitants.

Anyway it is still among the poorest big cities in Western Europe.
Yes, I used Campania as a proxy for Napoli metro area. Using a broader definition for São Paulo (the macrometropolitan area), we would have 31.7 million people with a GDP of US$ 21,500. São Paulo metro area (22.6 million people) is about to takeover Napoli: US$ 22,970.
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  #85  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2014, 7:11 PM
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Adding the Japanese:

-------------------- GDP 2011 (US$) -- Pop. 2011

Tokyo ---------------- US$ 2.276 tri --- 40.6 mi

Osaka ---------------- US$ 901.5 bi --- 19.3 mi


Nagoya --------------- US$ 477.4 bi ---- 9.1 mi

Fukuoka -------------- US$ 249.1 bi ---- 5.5 mi

Shizuoka -------------- US$ 146.7 bi ---- 2.7 mi

Sapporo --------------- US$ 107.1 bi ---- 2.3 mi

Sendai ----------------- US$ 102.5 bi ---- 2.3 mi

Hiroshima ------------- US$ 101.9 bi ---- 2.1 mi

Okayama --------------- US$ 78.3 bi ---- 1.6 mi

Niigata ------------------ US$ 66.9 bi ---- 1.4 mi

Kumamoto -------------- US$ 58.8 bi ---- 1.5 mi

Kagoshima -------------- US$ 47.9 bi ---- 1.1 mi

Matsuyama ------------- US$ 31.8 bi ---- 0.7 mi
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  #86  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2014, 3:19 AM
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Australian:

-------------------- GDP 2011 (US$) -- Pop. 2011

Sydney ---------------- US$ 326.9 bi ---- 4.6 mi

Melbourne ------------- US$ 259.0 bi ---- 4.2 mi

Brisbane --------------- US$ 135.3 bi ---- 2.1 mi

Perth ------------------- US$ 121.4 bi ---- 1.8 mi

Adelaide ----------------- US$ 67.3 bi ---- 1.3 mi
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  #87  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2014, 8:57 PM
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Adding NZ:

-------------------- GDP 2011 (US$) -- Pop. 2011

Auckland ----------------- US$ 58.8 bi ---- 1.5 mi
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  #88  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2014, 2:08 AM
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Steely, it sounds like those Great Lakes ports don't handle the main types of ocean-going ships, which supports my point.
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  #89  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2014, 10:38 PM
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8,000,000 - 14,000,000

-------------------- GDP 2011 (US$) -- Pop. 2011

Paris ------------------ US$ 807.2 bi --- 11.9 mi

Chicago --------------- US$ 554.5 bi ---- 9.7 mi

Milan ------------------ US$ 465.9 bi ---- 9.8 mi

Rio de Janeiro ---------- US$ 192.6 bi --- 12.6 mi

Tianjin ----------------- US$ 177.6 bi --- 13.2 mi

Johannesburg ----------- US$ 138.1 bi --- 12.3 mi


^^
Paris with its US$ 67,800 GDP per capita, it's the number one in Europe;

Chicago, despite its relative decline in both domestic and international arenas, still has a very high GDP per capita: US$ 57,000;

Milan's advantage over Rome is not as big as I'd assume. GDP per capita: US$ 47,500;

2011 was very good for Rio de Janeiro as the oil prices went up. GDP per capita at US$ 15,300;

Johannesburg at US$ 11,200 only. Weak rand and weak South African economic performance.
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  #90  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2014, 9:03 PM
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The French statistical office INSEE has published the (revised) 2011 and (first released) 2012 regional GDP figures.

The GDP of the Paris Region (11.95 million inhabitants) rose from 601.2 billion euros in 2011 to 612.3 billion euros in 2012.

For comparison, the GDP of The Netherlands (16.74 million inh.) rose from 599.0 billion euros in 2011 to 599.3 billion euros in 2012.

The GDP of North Rhine-Westphalia (17.55 million inh.) rose from 572.3 billion euros in 2011 to 582.1 billion euros in 2012.

The GDP of Bavaria (12.48 million inh.) rose from 456.3 billion euros in 2011 to 465.5 billion euros in 2012.
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  #91  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2014, 1:37 AM
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Are those 'Jones Act' ships that have to be built in the US?
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  #92  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2014, 5:51 AM
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Can you do Canadian cities? CMAs, whatever
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  #93  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2014, 4:13 PM
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Originally Posted by dc_denizen View Post
Are those 'Jones Act' ships that have to be built in the US?
yes, when the Jones Act was passed, the great lakes shoreline within US jurisdiction was included as america's 4th sea coast (along with the atlantic, gulf, and pacific coasts), so all shipping between US ports on the lakes must, by law, be carried on american-built, american-flagged, and american-crewed vessels, know as "lakers". most of the modern, large "lakers" in the US fleet were constructed in ship yards at either lorrain, OH, or sturgeon bay, WI. it has been a long time since a new "laker" was built for the US fleet because the freshwater of the great lakes means that steel hulls can last much, MUCH longer than vessels that ply salt water. ever since the expansion of the 1,000 foot lakers in the '70s/'80s, great lakes shipping capacity needs have not increased significantly, so new ship construction hasn't been needed in decades.

canada used to have similar legislation on the books to protect its shipping industry on its side of the lakes, but the law was recently relaxed and now some of the new lakers entering into service with the canadian fleet have been built over in china for obvious cost reasons. but i believe that ships serving between canadian ports on the lakes must still be canadian-flagged and canadian-crewed.

"salties", on the other hand, are typically foreign-built, foreign-flagged, and foreign-crewed ships that transfer goods to/from great lakes ports through the st. lawrence seaway to/from ports overseas.
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Last edited by Steely Dan; Feb 24, 2014 at 6:38 PM.
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  #94  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2014, 2:32 PM
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Those maps for American cities are gorgeous, a shame it isn't universal. The others look rather bland and featureless.
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  #95  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2014, 1:33 PM
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Better than no map at all.

By the way, Eurostat (the European statistical agency) has published the 2011 regional GDP figures for Europe. I'll update the list with maps when I have time, using 2011 figures for all metro areas (dunno whether the Japanese have already published their 2011 regional figures).
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  #96  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 7:52 PM
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^ steely dan - that would be lorain, ohio thankyouverymuch, not lorrain (?) or lorraine, the french city, although its named after that. thats where i mostly grew up so...lol!

anyway, on a completely different topic - nyc officially replaces london as world financial capital:

http://mobile.businessweek.com/news/...nancial-center
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  #97  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 1:13 PM
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And finally, the very big ones:

+14,000,000

-------------------- GDP 2011 (US$) -- Pop. 2011

Tokyo --------------- US$ 2.276 tri --- 40.6 mi

New York ------------ US$ 1,455.8 bi ---- 22.0 mi

London -------------- US$ 1,069.3 bi --- 22.7 mi

Osaka ---------------- US$ 901.5 bi --- 19.3 mi

Los Angeles ----------- US$ 897.2 bi ---- 18.1 mi

Rhein-Ruhr ------------ US$ 798.3 bi --- 17.6 mi

Seoul ----------------- US$ 535.8 bi --- 25.3 mi

São Paulo -------------- US$ 519.3 bi --- 22.6 mi

Moscow ---------------- US$ 451.4 bi --- 18.8 mi

Mexico City ------------ US$ 302.3 bi --- 24.5 mi

Shanghai -------------- US$ 297.0 bi --- 23.3 mi

Beijing ----------------- US$ 247.7 bi --- 20.1 mi

Bombay ---------------- US$ 112.5 bi --- 20.7 mi


^^
Tokyo: by far, the largest in the world. Comparable to Britain and Brazil, 6th and 7th largest GDP in the world. Osaka, very impressive as well;

New York: US$ 66,100 per capita. Very very impressive for a such large area;

For London, I had to use the whole Southeast England as its metro area definition. Although too large for European standards, it fits perfectly with the US CSA definitions. GDP per capita: US$ 47,100. Weak pound flattened London's GDP;

Los Angeles at "only" US$ 49,600 is way behind the Bay Area. Except for the Detroit and Miami, is the lowest amongst the US metro areas over 5 million people;

São Paulo with a very impressive US$ 23,000 per capita. Higher than developed countries like Portugal and Taiwan. By far, the largest economic hub of Latin America;

Moscow at US$ 24,000. The highest GDP per capita considering BRICS metro areas over 10 million people;

Mexico City GDP per capita (US$ 12,300) just above the national average and way behind Monterrey;

Shanghai (US$ 12,700) and Beijing (US$ 12,300) are behind the low-profile Tianjin (US$ 13,500). They are also far away from the BRICS competitors São Paulo and Moscow.
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  #98  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2015, 8:30 PM
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Love this thread. Stats junkie here. Yuri, do you have tables for Q1 of 2015 or even Q4 of 2014 ?

I only commented here as you referenced it in the LA thread, and this is a good thread, so a bump is in order.

Quote:
Country -- GDP 2011 (US$) -- Pop. 2011

USA --- 15.075.675.000.000 --- 311.591.917
Was checking the population clock (U.S.) and its at 321,267,615 for July 11th, 2015. I think GDP is at 17 or 18 trillion currently.
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  #99  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2015, 8:38 PM
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Thanks, Chris! You are kind.

I sadly lost all my files. I have to start from zero. I usually update the list when Brazilian Stats Office releases the numbers for the municipalities in December, with two years of delay. The Americans do it with one year.

I intend to work on the lists again. To me, the US and Brazilians are the easiest to obtain. For metro areas across the globe, it's much more demanding to find the right stats and I tend to use bigger areas as proxies (for instance, Genoa = Liguria; Milan = Lombardia, etc.).

And yes, the US is having a good growth. US$ 18 trillion according to IMF estimates for 2015. Brazil, on the other hand, it's going on the opposite direction: US$ 2.6 trillion in 2011 to US$ 1.9 trillion in 2015. Recession and the currency getting weaker and weaker due the bad shape of the economy.
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  #100  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2015, 9:53 PM
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Chris, some preview:

GDP 2013 and 2010

-------------------------------------- 2013 -------- 2010

UNITED STATES --------------- 16,665,215 -- 14,869,544 -- 12.1%

Code:
NEW YORK ----------------- 1,683,239 --- 1,532,418 --- 9.8%
--- New York ------------- 1,471,170 --- 1,338,889 --- 9.9%
--- Bridgeport -------------- 93,502 ------ 84,229 -- 11.0%
--- New Haven --------------- 44,165 ------ 41,283 --- 7.0%
--- Allentown --------------- 34,338 ------ 31,336 --- 9.6%
--- Trenton ----------------- 29,411 ------ 26,051 -- 12.9%
--- East Stroudsburg --------- 5,434 ------- 5,556 -- -2.2%
--- Kingston ----------------- 5,219 ------- 5,074 --- 2.9%

LOS ANGELES ---------------- 999,661 ----- 910,457 --- 9.8%
--- Los Angeles ------------ 826,826 ----- 757,003 --- 9.2%
--- San Bernardino --------- 126,761 ----- 113,648 -- 11.5%
--- Oxnard ------------------ 46,074 ------ 39,806 -- 15.7%

CHICAGO -------------------- 597,805 ----- 540,791 -- 10.5%
--- Chicago ---------------- 590,248 ----- 534,001 -- 10.5%
--- Michigan City ------------ 3,872 ------- 3,558 --- 8.8%
--- Kankakee ----------------- 3,685 ------- 3,232 -- 14.0%
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