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  #421  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2018, 10:11 PM
LRTfan LRTfan is offline
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Read through the entire staff report and if I'm Mr. Lamb, I'm headed straight to the OMB.... the staff report lists item after item that this project has in it's favour when measured up against Places to Grow. 1-2-3 bedroom units, public amenity space, retail on currently dead streets, walkable, great transit access, restoration of a heritage building, bike parking, less car parking etc.....

The report seems to intentionally leave out the fact that 1 block from this site are buildings of 28 and 32 stories (currently under construction). It only mentions buildings that are up to 22 stories on surrounding blocks.

It then makes the statement how this building will compete with Century 21 as tallest in the city....

Lots of nuggets in here for Mr Lamb's lawyers to rip apart and make a great case at the OMB.
He sent in his application before the deadline last year, so he access to the full OMB.

If I'm him, I give the city 2 options:
- OMB
- revised plan that includes demolishing the Pinehurst Mansion and building three 20-30 storey buildings on the site. Call their bluff on this stupid height restriction.
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  #422  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 12:07 AM
drpgq drpgq is offline
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Originally Posted by LRTfan View Post
Read through the entire staff report and if I'm Mr. Lamb, I'm headed straight to the OMB.... the staff report lists item after item that this project has in it's favour when measured up against Places to Grow. 1-2-3 bedroom units, public amenity space, retail on currently dead streets, walkable, great transit access, restoration of a heritage building, bike parking, less car parking etc.....

The report seems to intentionally leave out the fact that 1 block from this site are buildings of 28 and 32 stories (currently under construction). It only mentions buildings that are up to 22 stories on surrounding blocks.

It then makes the statement how this building will compete with Century 21 as tallest in the city....

Lots of nuggets in here for Mr Lamb's lawyers to rip apart and make a great case at the OMB.
He sent in his application before the deadline last year, so he access to the full OMB.

If I'm him, I give the city 2 options:
- OMB
- revised plan that includes demolishing the Pinehurst Mansion and building three 20-30 storey buildings on the site. Call their bluff on this stupid height restriction.
Agree 100% on pretty much all these points (especially the retail) and disagree with city planning staff. I'm actually a little surprised they are OK with 0.6 units of parking, but we should be getting rid of minimum parking anyways.

Without significant new supply, rents are going to go up higher and faster. A few low rises aren't going to cut it. I would much rather height, than greenfield sprawl, especially as a taxpayer.
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  #423  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 1:15 AM
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City planners pan 40-storey Television City tower
But developer Brad Lamb says he was already planning an OMB appeal

https://www.thespec.com/news-story/8...on-city-tower/

City planners are recommending against a 40-storey "Television City" condo project downtown that would vie for the title of tallest tower in the lower city.

But that's no problem, said developer Brad Lamb.

He always expected to appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board — and he plans to do so as early as Thursday, before council even weighs in.


"We'll continue to work toward the goal of bringing a development to the site," said Lamb Wednesday, arguing discussions with neighbours and the city can continue for months after an appeal.

"And if we can't, then we'll see everybody at the OMB."

The well-known Toronto condo developer pitched the $360-million, two-tower project last summer for the former CHCH TV site on Jackson Street West.

About 618 residential units and commercial frontage would be split between two towers, one with 30 storeys and another with 40.

A project website went live last fall offering prospective units priced at between $220,000 and almost $1 million.

Lamb said Wednesday he has pre-sold enough units to warrant construction on the first tower.

A new city report, now online ahead of next Tuesday's planning meeting, recommends denial of requested zoning amendments for the project because of shadow issues, building massing that risks "overpowering" pedestrians at street level and incompatibility with the neighbourhood, including nearby low-rise homes.

City planners make clear they aren't necessarily opposed to tall buildings on the site, but suggest "this should be achieved through a form and density of development that more appropriately considers the existing character and pattern of development in the area."

For example, the report suggests terracing and setbacks to make the project less imposing at ground level.

The current zoning for the site permits medium density residential like low or mid-rise apartments, although the proposed new downtown secondary plan — which is not yet approved — envisions the area as part of a large swath of the core covered by a maximum 30-storey designation.

Regardless, the 40-storey, 125-metre proposed tower would overtop the escarpment — a planning no-no — and rival the 43-storey Landmark Place (at about 130 metres) for tallest building in the lower city when combined with land elevation on the hilly Jackson Street site.

The project has also faced criticism from neighbourhood residents and the city's design review panel, with members of the latter raising concerns about the height and precedent it would set.

In a submission to the city, the Durand Neighbourhood Association praised the project's plans for new green space and bicycle parking. But otherwise it panned the design, height and massing of the two towers as "out of context" for the neighbourhood and a "shock to the senses."

Lamb has said in the past he wants the high-profile project to be the tallest building in the lower city. But he added his consortium has already "brought the height down" from a maximum 45 storeys in deference to neighbourhood concerns.

The outspoken developer said he intends to appeal to the OMB over the project as early as Thursday — despite the fact council has not considered the staff recommendation yet.

Lamb stressed he wants to continue discussions with planners and resident groups and hopes to find enough common ground to avoid going to a full-blown hearing that would likely be more than a year away.

But he suggested the towering project was always destined to be appealed — if not by himself, than surrounding residents.

"Height is always an issue," he said.

The would-be tower builder also said he prefers to argue his case before the existing provincial oversight board, rather than the pending replacement tribunal recently introduced by the province.

The introduction of the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal this spring is expected to shift more responsibility for land use planning decisions back on municipal councils. But any planning applications submitted before last December are already guaranteed appeal rights under the old OMB system.
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  #424  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 6:35 AM
bigguy1231 bigguy1231 is offline
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Let's see what city council says before we get bent out of shape about this. They know what's at stake and they may be hesitant to hang the closed for business sign out knowing that it might send the wrong message to potential investors in the downtown. They may also want to think about the millions is possible legal expenses if they have to start defending themselves before the OMB not just for this project but for many others that I am sure the planning department will try to prevent.
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  #425  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 11:48 AM
drpgq drpgq is offline
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"building massing that risks "overpowering" pedestrians at street level "

And yet Vranich's buildings continue to go up just across from Durand nimbys purview. Honestly who really cares that much about the pedestrians feeling overpowered there? There's relatively few of them, plus there's already a ton of monolithic apartment blocks all over the area.

I also wonder if these planners get the vapours walking around NYC.
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  #426  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 12:26 PM
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Dr Awesomesauce Dr Awesomesauce is offline
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^Vranich used to own strip clubs. His business was, amongst other things, the procurement of young ladies from Eastern Europe for the purposes of stripping and prostitution in his many houses of ill repute - Solid Gold being one of them.

He's scary and you can only imagine how much dirt he has on people. Ain't no neighbourhood association gonna tell him what to do.
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  #427  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 12:54 PM
LRTfan LRTfan is offline
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Anyone interested in seeing this project move ahead should email all of council before the meeting next week.
In fact, prepare to be emailing council a lot over the upcoming downtown secondary plan as well.
A small group has hijacked the process and are getting staff to water down the project in order to cater to their NIMBY needs.
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  #428  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 1:25 PM
Beedok Beedok is offline
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Originally Posted by Dr Awesomesauce View Post
^Vranich used to own strip clubs. His business was, amongst other things, the procurement of young ladies from Eastern Europe for the purposes of stripping and prostitution in his many houses of ill repute - Solid Gold being one of them.

He's scary and you can only imagine how much dirt he has on people. Ain't no neighbourhood association gonna tell him what to do.
A fitting leader for the Hamilton renaissance... If you want figures similar to the Italian renaissance.
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  #429  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 2:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Dr Awesomesauce View Post
^Vranich used to own strip clubs. His business was, amongst other things, the procurement of young ladies from Eastern Europe for the purposes of stripping and prostitution in his many houses of ill repute - Solid Gold being one of them.

He's scary and you can only imagine how much dirt he has on people. Ain't no neighbourhood association gonna tell him what to do.
Ah so that's all we need to build whatever we want in hamilton - blackmail on everyone
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  #430  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 4:31 PM
NortheastWind NortheastWind is offline
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Originally Posted by drpgq View Post
"building massing that risks "overpowering" pedestrians at street level "

And yet Vranich's buildings continue to go up just across from Durand nimbys purview. Honestly who really cares that much about the pedestrians feeling overpowered there? There's relatively few of them, plus there's already a ton of monolithic apartment blocks all over the area.
The Durand Neighbourhood Association started in 1972 to stop the demolition of a beautiful neighbourhood for the erection of those "monolithic apartment blocks".
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  #431  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 6:47 PM
LRTfan LRTfan is offline
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Originally Posted by NortheastWind View Post
The Durand Neighbourhood Association started in 1972 to stop the demolition of a beautiful neighbourhood for the erection of those "monolithic apartment blocks".
Herein lies the problem. The DNA is biased against apartments and apartment dwellers, even though those apartment dwellers are what give the neighbourhood it's density and great urban feel.
Some wealthy mansion owners in the south end of the hood driving everywhere aren't the ones using local parks, bike lanes, cafes etc.....

The DNA was right to form and prevent demolition of some stunning old homes, but their angst should be directed at needless demolitions, not the buildings that replaced the mansions.
And if they are going to insist on maintaining angsts towards the replacement structures, they should have a serious hate on for the 2-storey homes on Wesanford since they replaced the W.E. Sanford mansion.
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  #432  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 8:03 PM
markbarbera markbarbera is offline
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Originally Posted by drpgq View Post
"building massing that risks "overpowering" pedestrians at street level "

And yet Vranich's buildings continue to go up just across from Durand nimbys purview. Honestly who really cares that much about the pedestrians feeling overpowered there? There's relatively few of them, plus there's already a ton of monolithic apartment blocks all over the area.

I also wonder if these planners get the vapours walking around NYC.
We are comparing apples to oranges. Vranich certainly hasn't built a building close to the height that Lamb is proposing, nor has he proposed a building that exceeds the height restrictions for its neighbourhood.

The staff recommendation is valid. The building design doesn't make any attempt to fit in the neighbourhood. The extra height could have been mitigated by a design that incorporated a podium with setback, like what was designed into 20-22 George or the William Thomas student residence.

Lamb should go back to the drawing board and produce something that fits better at this address, or find a different property that is more suitable for it.
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  #433  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 8:34 PM
LRTfan LRTfan is offline
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Originally Posted by markbarbera View Post
We are comparing apples to oranges. Vranich certainly hasn't built a building close to the height that Lamb is proposing, nor has he proposed a building that exceeds the height restrictions for its neighbourhood.

The staff recommendation is valid. The building design doesn't make any attempt to fit in the neighbourhood. The extra height could have been mitigated by a design that incorporated a podium with setback, like what was designed into 20-22 George or the William Thomas student residence.

Lamb should go back to the drawing board and produce something that fits better at this address, or find a different property that is more suitable for it.

Or take his $360 million investment into a community that doesn't have its head stuck up its rear end.
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  #434  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 9:42 PM
Crapht Crapht is offline
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I'm pretty much neutral on this project but can somebody tell me how the CHCH building fit in well with the neighbourhood? It basically ignored the neighbourhood. Plant some trees in front of a silver/grey box and pretend we're not here?
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  #435  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 11:04 PM
timach timach is offline
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Gosh, I hate the people in charge of our city!! "Hey guys, we got an investor willing to build a $300 million dollar condo that will bring MILLIONS in taxes a year to our city right in the middle of downtown. Oh what's that it's 40 stories? You must be crazy 40 stories is unheard of! Tell him to leave our city!!"
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  #436  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 11:04 PM
LRTfan LRTfan is offline
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I'm pretty much neutral on this project but can somebody tell me how the CHCH building fit in well with the neighbourhood? It basically ignored the neighbourhood. Plant some trees in front of a silver/grey box and pretend we're not here?

the whole 'fits in with the neighbouring buildings' is a load of nonsense. If that was our guideline for development then nothing would ever get built. Literally nothing.

A cul-de-sac of 2.5 storey homes with 3 car garages doesn't fit with the farmland next door.
The Pigott Building didn't fit with all the low rise buildings in the city when it was built.
The steel mills and their 30 storey smokestacks didn't fit with a grassy harbour shore.
City Hall as a modern, space-age looking building didn't fit in the old Victorian downtown
Hambly House in Westdale didn't fit one bit amongst the modest brick bungalows next door

The list is endless....this is how cities grow. How on earth Hamilton ended up with an anti-business, anti-common sense city hall is beyond me, considering we've been one of the most depressed cities in Canada for decades. We need to start growing again. We're 4 decades behind.
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  #437  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2018, 11:45 PM
drpgq drpgq is offline
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Originally Posted by markbarbera View Post
We are comparing apples to oranges. Vranich certainly hasn't built a building close to the height that Lamb is proposing, nor has he proposed a building that exceeds the height restrictions for its neighbourhood.

The staff recommendation is valid. The building design doesn't make any attempt to fit in the neighbourhood. The extra height could have been mitigated by a design that incorporated a podium with setback, like what was designed into 20-22 George or the William Thomas student residence.

Lamb should go back to the drawing board and produce something that fits better at this address, or find a different property that is more suitable for it.
Vranich used a committee of adjustment application to get around a height restriction.
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  #438  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2018, 1:59 AM
durandy durandy is offline
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They may also want to think about the millions is possible legal expenses if they have to start defending themselves before the OMB not just for this project but for many others that I am sure the planning department will try to prevent.
Th city has in house OMB lawyers.
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  #439  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2018, 2:45 AM
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Television City towers are too tall, planners say, but the developer is already appealing
A city planning report recommends rejecting rezoning the property, but Brad Lamb says it doesn't matter

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilt...city-1.4577885

A sky-scraping Hamilton condo development is in for a fight now that the city seems poised to reject its rezoning. But the big-name developer behind it says he's already appealed it to a provincial board anyway.

City planners say councillors should reject Brad Lamb's proposal for Television City, two planned condo towers of 40 and 30 storeys at 163 Jackson St. W.

The towers wouldn't fit with the surrounding neighbourhood, says a staff report coming to city council's planning committee Tuesday. And they're incompatible with plans already laid out for the neighbourhood.

Jason Farr, Ward 2 councillor, says he's thought that "right from the get go."

"When I first met Brad and sat with him and staff, I suggested it might be a little too much on such a tight site."

"I have not in my time seen so much (public) feedback contrary to a proposal."

But Lamb says he's not surprised or deterred by the staff report. That's why he appealed the project to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) Thursday — before next week's vote has even happened.

Now "what (councillors) think and feel is … not irrelevant, but it's not the guiding course," said Lamb, who has four Hamilton projects in various stages.

"Nothing ever goes easily or smoothly, especially when you want to build beautiful buildings."

Television City, by all accounts, would permanently change the Hamilton skyline.

The two buildings, taller than the escarpment, would hold a combined 618 units, plus four ground-floor commercial spaces. It would also have 397 parking spaces for vehicles and 500 for bicycles.

The development is called Television City because it's located at the former CHCH Television studios. The plan incorporates the historic building there now, called Pinehurst Residence. The first tower, Lamb says, is sold out.

The proposal does help meet the city's goal of intensifying the downtown, the report says. But the twin tower concept is "over intensification."

The buildings don't "complement the surrounding massing, patterns, rhythm or character" of the neighbourhood around them, the report says.

The design also doesn't provide a height transition to the mostly two-storey buildings around it, which is typically done with a podium design.

Lamb dismisses the idea of the terraced look.

"There's a serious ailment going on in planning departments across Canada," he said. "It's called podium-itis."

If new buildings only fit with the ones next to it, he said, nothing would ever get built.

Lamb says he appealed to the OMB already because the Liberals are doing away with the board next year. The government will replace it with a Local Planning Appeals Tribunal, which is seen as less developer friendly.

Lamb says he'd rather negotiate Television City details with city staff. But he has to appeal while there's still an OMB.

"If Kathleen Wynne's government had not pulled the plug on the OMB, we would not be going to the OMB," he said. "Between the parties involved, there's absolutely going to be a settlement."

The staff report lists other issues.

People using balconies, it says, could look down into the backyards of single-family homes next door. And the towers will partially block the sun on surrounding sidewalks.

And the city's draft downtown secondary plan — which will go public Monday — only allows for 12 storeys in that location.

Any decision committee members make Tuesday will have to be ratified by city council on March 28.
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  #440  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2018, 3:06 AM
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Maybe Lamb could work out a swap with Hue and build his 40-storey tower on James South. Could call it Church City and name the units after famous historical religious figures. No risk of tweets from them... and instead of legal threats there would just be possible spiritual consequences in the afterlife to worry about.

I can see both sides of this issue, but the "could look down into the backyards of single-family homes next door" argument is silly. That's equally likely with anything that's not the same height as the existing homes. Sure, someone higher up has more viewing angle into more yards, but they're also farther away, even if using binoculars (and people in houses spy on their neighbours a lot too). Probably more interesting things to spy on in the adjacent apartment towers anyway.

"If new buildings only fit with the ones next to it, he said, nothing would ever get built." -- Lamb channeling LRTfan there.
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