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  #1041  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2011, 11:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spoolmak View Post
The guy who was murdered in Kamloops yesterday was killed by, guess, a first nations man.
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Originally Posted by Spoolmak View Post
The prairies just stay at high rates yer in year out because of what I stated above. That, and high native populations.
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Originally Posted by mintzilla View Post
^^^change has to come from within the first nations communities, anything else will be just spun as an attack on their traditional way of life (which is oddly violent)
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Originally Posted by mintzilla View Post
i highly doubt that is true. your lucky that Edmonton is the "filter" of sorts that keeps your (aboriginal) numbers low. i guess the fact that our city has been run by bleeding hearts for so long doesnt help our case though...
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Originally Posted by mintzilla View Post
^ its easier to make excuses and blame others than to work on a solution...
You're both suggesting that First Nations people are violent by nature, when it's been explained over and over again that crime stems from poverty. You're both not only racists, you are fools.

Mintzilla, I find you especially offensive, you're comments make me wonder what you mean by solution...
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  #1042  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2011, 12:31 PM
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Originally Posted by drto View Post
It is an aboriginal issue in that a lot of aboriginals live in poverty "because" they are aboriginal.

While you make some good points on this Vid, one thing I fail to see in this argument is "choice". As individuals, every person has a choice. A choice to turn to drugs or not, a choice to attend school or not, a choice to succeed or not. In this day and age, it is ignorant to group all aboriginals into one group where failure is inevitable "because they are aboriginal".
At least 60% of aboriginal people don't fail. But that is still lower than the number of non-aboriginal people who don't fail. Yes, everyone has a choice. I grew up in poverty surrounded by drugs and alcohol and I've done neither (mainly because being surrounded by so much of it, I decided that it was a disgusting thing that I didn't want any part of). But for a lot of aboriginal people, especially those from First Nations or broken families, making the choice to "not fail" is more difficult than it is for kids in middle class families. Because of where they live and who surrounds them, they have less choices to do something other than drugs and alcohol.

By being born into an aboriginal family, aboriginal kids face more challenges from the start than non-aboriginals kids. This isn't inherent in aboriginal people, it is the result of something forced on them. I don't mean to unfairly group all aboriginals together in this. Some are lucky enough to be a generation or two removed from any kind of pain other than racism, and others are lucky enough to have the fortitude to overcome any challenge.

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Originally Posted by drto View Post
I agree that more can, and should be done to help aboriginals strive to succeed but the government has many programs in place that give individuals of aboriginal ancestry every chance to advance themselves.
The government has programmes in place, yes. But First Nations often don't, or try to but can't find funding for them. We have to find out why aboriginal people aren't taking advantage of the programmes the government offers and solve that problem. If it is because they have no basic education, then provide one. If it is because the programmes are run by the federal government instead of First Nations leadership, then give them the ability to provide the programmes themselves, and so on.

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Originally Posted by drto View Post
Internet businesses, as an example, don't have a "face" per se, that might allow for discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, etc. There are limitless opportunities via the web for business success.
One of the most notable in my region is Fort Serven's t-shirt business. They sell them on-line. The biggest challenge to this is access to broadband internet. Many First Nations don't have access to it in the remote northern parts of provinces, but that is improving in Northwestern Ontario with a public/private partnership to provide a broadband loop to much of the region.

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Originally Posted by drto View Post
I don't know the specifics you refer to with respect to education but I went to medical school with two individuals of native ancestry, whom I believe had their education paid for by the government!
But not their rent, or their text books, or their clothes, or food, or any extra-curricular expenditures. The government pays the course fee or tuition. That is it. It isn't much different than a basic scholarship. This is no "live for free, eat for free, and get a full education and you never have to pay anything back" deal.

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Originally Posted by drto View Post
They took every advantage provided to them under the agreements and made the best for themselves that they possibly could.
Which is great, and is happening more often now, but they were only able to take advantage of it because they had a full education before university. For aboriginal students living in a reserve with an inadequate school, this opportunity for self betterment is practically non-existent. As far as moving them to urban areas for education, Thunder Bay has just seen the 9th aboriginal teenager "disappear" in 10 years, while many others struggle with drug and alcohol abuse. Even Aboriginal students who get the chance to complete a full high school education in this city struggle with it. The school has started plans to build a safe residence for them instead of placing them in homes (people can sponsor a student, sort of like adoption of a high schooler for the school year), which will be located beside the school, and they've begun a programme to help students overcome their addictions. How long will they have money for this though? There are a lot of aboriginal led programmes that have failed because of lack of funding, and Northern Nishnawbe Education Council was almost one of them.

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Originally Posted by BretttheRiderFan View Post
OK, here's the cities and provinces/territories by crime and their corresponding Native populations (crime rates according to Maclean's as of 2009 Aboriginal populations according to StatsCan as of 2006)

Provinces/Territories

1. Nunuvat- 85.0%
2. Northwest Territories- 50.3%
3. Yukon- 25.1%
4. Saskatchewan- 14.9%
5. Manitoba- 15.5%
6. British Columbia- 4.8%
7. Alberta- 5.8%
8. Nova Scotia- 2.7%
9. Quebec- 1.5%
10. Newfoundland and Labrador- 4.7%
11. New Brunswick- 2.5%
12. Ontario- 2.0%
13. Prince Edward Island- 1.3%

Cities

1. Prince George, B.C.- 11.4%
2. Victoria, B.C.- 3.7%
3. Regina, Sask- 9.3%
4. Saskatoon, Sask- 9.9%
5. Fort McMurray, Alta- 10.4%
6. Kelowna, B.C- 3.4%
7. Grande Prairie, Alta- 9.3%
8. Surrey, B.C- 1.9%
9. Chilliwack, B.C- 4.9%
10. Winnipeg, Man- 10.1%
Here are two more complete charts if anyone wants to spend time making a better comparison:

Aboriginal identity population by province and census division

Aboriginal identity population by province and census agglomeration or CMA for 2001, 2006, and comparing growth from 2001 to 2006. Sherbrooke, Quebec data is incomplete because that CMA changed a lot between censuses and I can't figure out why its aboriginal population went from 150 to 1,150, so I have posted only 2006 population data.
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  #1043  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2011, 5:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by logan5 View Post


Mintzilla, I find you especially offensive, you're comments make me wonder what you mean by solution...
first off, get a life.

change has to come from within the first nations communities, anything else will be just spun as an attack on their traditional way of life (which is oddly violent)

how in the hell is that racist? so change shouldn't come from within the community? i guess change shouldn't come from within those middle eastern countries that are fighting to better their lives either. and to say levels of violence arnt slightly higher is not gonna help anything.

i highly doubt that is true. your lucky that Edmonton is the "filter" of sorts that keeps your (aboriginal) numbers low. i guess the fact that our city has been run by bleeding hearts for so long doesnt help our case though...

dont add words to my posts then call me a racist for the words that you added. you look like a fool doing that!

its easier to make excuses and blame others than to work on a solution...

I didnt mean aboriginals with this one, i meant as a country everyone just wants to make excuses and not actually fix anything. this includes EVERYONE. but i guess your one of those guys that thinks what we have been doing for the past 100 years has been working


so ya learn to read before you go around calling people racists.
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  #1044  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2011, 5:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mintzilla View Post
i highly doubt that is true. your lucky that Edmonton is the "filter" of sorts that keeps your (aboriginal) numbers low. i guess the fact that our city has been run by bleeding hearts for so long doesnt help our case though...

dont add words to my posts then call me a racist for the words that you added. you look like a fool doing that!
Care to explain then what you meant by "your [sic] lucky that Edmonton is the 'filter' of sorts that keeps your numbers low" if you didn't mean "numbers of first nations or aboriginal residents"? I'm not sure how you can plausibly argue that you meant anything else, especially when that remark was made in direct reply to this post (which you even quoted in your reply):

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgarian
Calgary has as many aboriginals as most of the cities you posted,
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Last edited by Reesonov; Apr 6, 2011 at 5:33 PM.
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  #1045  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2011, 5:29 PM
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Edmonton is kicking ass this year with its murder rate... in the wrong way.
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  #1046  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2011, 5:33 PM
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^^ i meant homicide numbers low, not aboriginal numbers. many homicides involve the aboriginal community so Edmonton as the more northern city would likely have a greater aboriginal population.

what we need to be doing is altering the way aboriginal affairs are handled. give them the resources to improve their communities and remove barriers that prevent them from doing that. strengthening the aboriginal community is probably one of the most important things Canada needs to do for numerous reasons. We cant just keep pretending there isnt a problem and going about business as usual because it is not working.
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  #1047  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2011, 7:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miketoronto View Post
Quebec City usually comes up with no murders I heard? I think they had zero last year or the year before.
Wonder what their trick is to such low crime.
Homogeneity?
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  #1048  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2011, 7:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mintzilla View Post
^^ i meant homicide numbers low, not aboriginal numbers. many homicides involve the aboriginal community so Edmonton as the more northern city would likely have a greater aboriginal population.
Even if that's true, I'm not sure it's a very meaningful distinction. You're still suggesting that Calgary is "lucky" because Edmonton acts as some sort of Aboriginal or First Nations "filter". I don't mean to belabour the point, but living in Saskatchewan for the last few years, one encounters a great deal of this sort of "its not a crime problem, its an indian problem". As vid has eloqently pointed out I think, that is clearly not true. I can speak from my own experience in the criminal justice system that it is clearly not true.
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  #1049  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2011, 8:48 PM
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This would be number 6 in HRM :
lake echo just outside Dartmouth :


Police now say Lake Echo death a homicide



Police have launched a homicide investigation into the death of a man in Lake Echo that was originally deemed as suspicious.

Halifax RCMP spokesman Cpl. Scott MacRae said they have now ruled the death as a homicide. He also said the victim is a 20-year-old man. He was found at a residence off of Mineville Road on Sunday.

MacRae said a sequence of events led police to the property yesterday.

“As with any investigation, there is information out there that led us to this property,” MacRae said.

Investigators are hoping to receive results from the autopsy by the end of day today. Police are not releasing the cause of death because it is pertinent to the investigation.

“It’s still pretty early in the investigation and we’re continuing with all avenues to find out what happened here (Sunday) and hopefully put the pieces of t he puzzle together to find out the magic why,” MacRae said.
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  #1050  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2011, 8:26 PM
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An unfortunate second homicide for Thunder Bay:

Quote:
'Shocked'
Jeff Labine | TBNewswatch | 12 April 2011
http://www.tbnewswatch.com/news/Default.aspx?cid=141440

...

Thunder Bay Police Service officers charged 63-year-old John Robertson with second-degree murder in connection to the death of his wife Elaine Audrey Robertson, 61, on Monday. Robertson surrendered to police at the Balmoral Street police station just before 11 p.m. The couple lived at the Suncrest apartments on Oliver Road where police found the body of the deceased.

...

Residents said they couldn’t believe what had happened.

William Mandryk has lived in the building for 10 years with his wife and seldom sees anything out of the ordinary. He said the apartment building is a nice place to live. It’s quiet and most of the tenants are seniors he added.

"I was surprised to see the police cars this morning," Mandryk said. "This is weird."

Rob Shaw moved into the apartment five years ago. He said he heard the news about the murder on the radio in the morning. He described the couple as nice, with the husband always looking out for his wife.

"They seemed nice," Shaw said. "I was surprised as hell."

...

http://www.tbnewswatch.com/news/Default.aspx?cid=141440
I used to live across the street from this place.
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  #1051  
Old Posted Apr 14, 2011, 1:47 PM
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Montreal is at 13.

A man was beaten to death by mistake friday in Verdun and they found a body in a creepy apartment in PAT Tuesday.
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  #1052  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2011, 1:50 AM
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http://www.edmontonsun.com/2011/04/2...mposium-on-tap

Bill Pitt is determined to get to the bottom of Edmonton’s soaring homicide rate.
But he’s not going to do it alone.
The city criminologist and Grant MacEwan University professor recently announced he is in the midst of organizing a homicide symposium, scheduled for May 20.
The symposium will likely include leaders from within the Edmonton Police Service, the Alberta Council of Women’s Shelters and some city politicians, but panel guests have yet to be confirmed.
This year’s murder count so far is at 19 compared to four last year in Edmonton. In contrast, Calgary has recorded two homicides in 2011.
Pitt noted Edmonton’s homicide rate is greater than American cities such as San Diego, Austin, Texas and Salt Lake City.
The symposium will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 20 at the Grant MacEwan downtown campus in room 6-214.
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  #1053  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2011, 3:02 PM
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Number 7 for HRM
North Preston just outside Dartmouth :




Man dies in North Preston shooting

CBC News




A 22-year-old man was shot to death in North Preston on Sunday.

Halifax District RCMP said someone reported a shooting on Churchill Terrace just before 6:30 p.m.

The man died in an ambulance on the way to hospital. His name has not been released.

Cpl. Scott MacRae said investigators believe the shooting was not a random act.

No one was arrested as of Monday morning.

Churchill Terrace is a small lane off Cain Street, less than a block away from Nelson Whynder Elementary School.

The shooting happened in the street. Police evidence markers dotted the road as the investigation continued Monday.

"Certainly we'll be in the community for the better part of the day," MacRae said.

Anyone with information is asked to contact RCMP or Crime Stoppers.
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  #1054  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2011, 9:22 PM
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Regarding Edmonton's numbers, which are now at 17 homicides for 2011 I think:

1. one or maybe 2 of them actually occurred last year and were only classified as homicides this year. Not sure why those numbers would not be included in the 2010 stats rather than for 2011.

2. 2 of this year's homicides were police shootings. Technically they are homicides but I don't think I would consider them murder.

So Edmonton's numbers are still rather high, but not as high (in my opinion) as they appear at first glance.
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  #1055  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2011, 9:31 PM
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Originally Posted by lubicon View Post
1. one or maybe 2 of them actually occurred last year and were only classified as homicides this year. Not sure why those numbers would not be included in the 2010 stats rather than for 2011.
They correct the data for the previous year later on. If the crime was committed in 2010, it is data for 2010, even if it isn't ruled homicide until 2011.

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Originally Posted by lubicon View Post
2. 2 of this year's homicides were police shootings. Technically they are homicides but I don't think I would consider them murder.
They aren't counted in the homicide statistics, they've got their own statistics for those incidents.
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  #1056  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2011, 7:45 AM
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Holy shit Edmonton's already at 19?


Toronto is at 21.
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  #1057  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2011, 7:54 AM
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We're at 15.
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  #1058  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2011, 12:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -Harlington- View Post
Number 7 for HRM
Not a surprise. Halifax is quite a violent city by Canadian standards.
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  #1059  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2011, 5:45 PM
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Not a surprise. Halifax is quite a violent city by Canadian standards.
as much as i should try to deny it, sadly it is true

they're even making a movie about it, lol
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  #1060  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2011, 11:53 PM
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Not a surprise. Halifax is quite a violent city by Eastern Canadian standards.
Fixed it for ya
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