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  #3521  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2017, 4:13 AM
mt_climber13 mt_climber13 is offline
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The Towering Inferno was prescient

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  #3522  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2017, 10:42 AM
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1977 - Thanks! I got 3 decent pictures out of 600 taken. Link from the image for a couple more photos from the lightning event.
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  #3523  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2017, 9:44 PM
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From SFGate/Chronicle - the jury is still out for me

Quote:
Preview of Salesforce sculpture at Hosfelt Gallery

The tallest piece of public art on Earth, a nine-story electronic sculpture in the round by Jim Campbell, is coming to the top of Salesforce Tower.

Its opening keeps getting delayed by construction, and it probably won’t light up the sky until the end of the year, but anxious viewers can see it on a smaller — and closer — scale at Hosfelt Gallery.

“You can get the feel of the presentation that will be on Salesforce at the Hosfelt Gallery,” says Campbell, adding that one can also get a feel for how his art is assembled and how it works in a way that is nearly impossible once installed at Salesforce, where the work will be 61 stories up.



The 10-by-20-foot work is called “Splitting the Crowd,” and it is the centerpiece of “Far Away Up Close,” a solo exhibition of Campbell’s mesmerizing video-based art that opened last weekend. The imagery in “Splitting the Crowd” is not a duplicate, because the Salesforce piece will use live pictures captured around the city each day for broadcast that same night, hence its name “Day for Night.” By contrast, “Splitting the Crowd” uses video that Campbell shot at the Women’s March in Washington in January.

But the technology is the same. Both works use high-definition digital video that is converted to low resolution to reflect an image off a building. Human figures can be seen, but their movements are portrayed in an abstract sea of color, like they are moving through dense San Francisco fog.

At Hosfelt, you can stand at the back of the darkened room and make out the moving humans 80 feet away. Then you can walk toward the art and watch them become more abstract with each step. When you are close enough to touch the metal screen, the art is revealed to be three-dimensional. There are 700 LED lights, each mounted on its own little metal rod so that the light points toward the screen.

This is a hallmark of Campbell’s art. Unlike most video displays, which point the light toward the viewer, Campbell’s work points the light toward the screen, thereby softening the image.



“You are not really seeing the image. You’re seeing a reflection of the image,” says gallery owner Todd Hosfelt, who has represented Campbell for 18 years — which is how long Campbell has been working in LED.

The 700 lights mounted on their little metal stands for “Splitting the Crowd” at Hosfelt Gallery will become 11,000 LED lights mounted on stands to surround Salesforce Tower. In either case, the MIT-educated Campbell has fabricated each and every light in his Dogpatch studio.

“What distinguishes him from anybody else making highly technical work is the fact that Jim is an engineer,” says Hosfelt. “He designs and builds all of his own electronics. It is both really high-tech and handmade.”
http://www.sfgate.com/art/article/Pr...y-12195446.php
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  #3524  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2017, 5:00 AM
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Salesforce 09/16/2017

I've noticed that the top floors the last two nights have not been lit. Apparently work is not happening 24/7 there at those levels.

Salesforce San Francisco Tower - 09/16/2017
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  #3525  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2017, 9:45 AM
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  #3526  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2017, 6:59 PM
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Shots from yesterday.




I don't think anyone has mentioned the strange crane sticking out of the West side of the building (viewable on camera). Anyone have more details or thoughts on that?
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  #3527  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2017, 5:22 PM
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^I think that extension may just be a test of the permanent window washing equipment?

For any civil engineers out there, this article is a dream:
1,070-Foot Salesforce Tower Elevates Seismic Design

And for those less geeky, there are still several interesting nuggets:
Quote:

“We were aware of the problems with Millennium Tower and wanted to be sure to avoid anything like that performance,” says Dunn.

After value-engineering, the caissons became 42 load-bearing elements (LBEs) socketed 70 ft into rock. The 10.5-ft x 5-ft LBEs—a first for San Francisco—reach down as deep as 310 ft from grade. They are the city’s deepest foundations, says MKA’s Klemencic.

The LBE work did not go smoothly. Problems with voids and soft tops led to a fix that was a big contributor to a six-month construction delay, says Wilson.
Quote:
PCPA’s scheme called for a 1,200-ft-tall tower, encompassing 1.8 million sq ft. In late 2008, when Hines and TJPA were close to a final agreement but before any documents had been signed, the Great Recession hit, the bottom fell out of the real estate market, and the project was virtually shelved.

“We knew immediately that the price was too high, the timing was too short, and either the design was too expensive or the building was too big,” says Hines’ Paradis.
Quote:
At 61 floors, however, the tower was still 150 ft short of the agreed-upon 1,070-ft height. To compensate, a latticework crown of structural steel was added. By allowing the sun’s rays to pass through it, the crown breaks up shadows. By comparison, in the 1,200-ft scheme, some of the crown’s lower floors would have been occupied, says Paradis.

TJPA on March 26, 2013, transferred the land to the developer at a reduced cost of $190 million, with no funds earmarked for the rooftop park. “The land was a big bargain,” says Switzky.

Schematic design began in 2013. But with no tenant prospects, the developer had a contingency plan to stop construction at grade if the market changed dramatically for the worse, says Hines’ Paradis.

To reach the 920-ft height of the occupied portion, PCPA designed 14-ft, 9-in. floor-to-floor heights, including a raised floor one foot above the structural slab. A raised floor is “somewhat unconventional” for a spec office tower because it adds cost, but it also allows underfloor air distribution, says Clark Bisel, currently senior mechanical consultant for Meyers + Engineers. Bisel designed Salesforce Tower before he left WSP USA, the project’s consulting engineer.

Underfloor air distribution minimizes fan energy and eliminates overhead ductwork. To take advantage of San Francisco’s mild climate, outside air—brought in at each floor through louvers in the curtain wall—is used for ventilation and free cooling much of the time.

Instead of mechanical floors, each level has two mechanical rooms in the core. That avoided big duct risers to distribute air from the mechanical floors but required openings—one for supply air and the other for return air—in the 3-ft-thick core walls.
Quote:

By the time MKA got the CSL test results for the first pile, crews were working on pile six, says Klemencic. The report showed anomalies—changes in density at specific locations in the LBE’s upper 20 to 30 ft.

“That suggests a soft spot—clay or rock in place of concrete,” says Klemencic. The hope was that the data was flawed. “CSL testing is an indication, but it is not necessarily conclusive,” Klemencic adds.

Bencor proceeded with the work, as instructed, says Santarelli. Concurrently, MKA investigated protocols for how to take care of any anomalies.

Soon, crews drilled a 4-in.-dia core in the LBE and sent a camera down. There was a void “the size of a basketball,” says Klemencic.

Additional test data showed consistent anomalies in the LBEs. And further scrutiny of CSL data suggested the LBEs had “soft” tops—1,000-psi concrete, instead of the specified 8,000 psi, adds Klemencic. Ultimately, MKA insisted on remediation for the tops of all 42 LBEs.

The LBEs had been built from grade, with an extra 60 ft at the very top that would be sacrificed during the excavation. Clark decided to excavate the site before the fix, cutting off the sacrificial 60 ft to get closer to the problem tops as much as 90 ft below grade. That meant deepening the excavation and the braced shoring walls to access the 12 LBEs along the perimeter. Clark built a cofferdam around the LBEs in the center of the site so it could isolate and recast the tops.

Klemencic declines to speculate about the cause of the problems. Santarelli blames the voids and the soft tops on the greater rebar congestion near the top, which “prevented the concrete,” installed from the bottom up, from flowing properly. During the fix, crews worked from the top down, which made it easier to deal with the rebar congestion, says Santarelli.

In any case, the fix seems to have worked. To date, the building has performed slightly better than the predicted 11⁄8 in. of settlement, which Klemencic says is from anticipated downward displacement due to axial shortening of the LBEs.

“We have a very extensive monitoring program,” he adds. “The dirt is not moving.

“I’ve said many times that the foundation for Salesforce Tower is probably the best foundation ever built in San Francisco because it’s the only one anyone dug up and looked at,” says Klemencic.
Quote:

And the leasing of the tower has been far more successful than Paradis ever anticipated. “We began the project with no leasing and no leasing prospects,” he says. “Leasing has gone very well.”

In 2014, Salesforce, a cloud computing company, signed a lease for 700,000 sq ft and bought the naming rights. “It was the largest lease in San Francisco history,” says Paradis. Since then, Salesforce has taken an additional 100,000 sq ft, he says.

The building is roughly 90% leased. Negotiations are active with prospective tenants. Paradis says he is “very happy” he didn’t pull the plug during the “depressing” times of the recession.
Source: http://www.enr.com/articles/42725-07...seismic-design
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  #3528  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2017, 11:21 PM
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At Last! 09/22/2017

As of today I can see there is a section on the west side completed all the way to the top of the building! View from my apartment in the Civic Center (with a telephoto lens).

Salesforce San Francisco
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  #3529  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2017, 11:40 PM
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Window Washer Platforms 09/22/2017

fimiak - I noticed the 2 cranes today. I've seen these on other high-rise buildings & yes they are for the window washers. I can see 2 of them from my view in the Civic Center. (photo taken with a telephoto lens)

Salesforce San Francisco
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  #3530  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2017, 11:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botoxic View Post
For any civil engineers out there, this article is a dream:
1,070-Foot Salesforce Tower Elevates Seismic Design
Fantastic post--thanks a bunch.
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  #3531  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2017, 6:10 PM
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What's great about SF tower is that it compliments the Trans America building. It doesn't steal the show entirely. 2 iconic towers in the city.
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  #3532  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2017, 6:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry of San Fran View Post
fimiak - I noticed the 2 cranes today. I've seen these on other high-rise buildings & yes they are for the window washers. I can see 2 of them from my view in the Civic Center. (photo taken with a telephoto lens)

Salesforce San Francisco
What's with the brown stain? Hope it's not rust already. looks like they may need to do a quick spray painting job before it's even finished.
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  #3533  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2017, 6:48 PM
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Sunday 09/24/2017

The skin is nearly completely in place on the west side except for a vertical sliver.

Yes, it is curious why a section has a rust color to it.

Telephoto view from my apartment.

Salesforce San Francisco
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  #3534  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2017, 2:45 PM
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As a Chicagoan i can appreciate a beautiful skyline when i see one and San Fran is top 5 and climbing!
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  #3535  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2017, 5:49 PM
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It's funny - prior to construction, various renderings left people wondering if Salesforce Tower would be blue, white, silver, or even purple. Now that it is built, we can see that under differing conditions, almost all are valid. I wish 181 were shown completely in this photo - the play of sunlight on the slight surface angles looks to produce some intriguing sunrise and sunset effects.


Market Street view from Twin Peak, San Francisco, CA by Kevin Wang, on Flickr
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  #3536  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2017, 5:55 PM
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Just imagine Oceanwide in the morning. Also the Gang tower at 100 Folsom. Even 400 Folsom will be amazing.

donnie...many think San Francisco sits comfortably at #3 skyline in the US, although it definitely is in a struggle against LA, Miami, and Seattle for this.

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  #3537  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2017, 9:05 PM
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  #3538  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2017, 4:04 AM
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Hope the Salesforce Tower will be able to light up in time for Halloween.

Quote:
The panels are going up now, but the completed artwork will not be displayed until the fall.
http://www.ktvu.com/news/art-install...lesforce-tower
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  #3539  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2017, 7:55 PM
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West Side is Now Complete

Except for 4 windows, the west side is complete! I am happy to see the finished building in my view now. It is impressive.

Salesforce San Francisco
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  #3540  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2017, 8:24 PM
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^^^ Sweet! So many of the current "supertalls" are so fussy looking. This is an elegant and timeless skyscraper. Btw did anyone figure out what the discoloration (in the crown) is all about?
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