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  #21  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 4:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Hed Kandi View Post
Assume that I wanted a foundation in Historic Western Architecture, perhaps Art Nouveau or Baroque, where should I go?
Interior design. Neither of those are particularly architectural styles as much as they are wall coverings and decoration.
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  #22  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 5:00 PM
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Interior design. Neither of those are particularly architectural styles as much as they are wall coverings and decoration.
I'm not talking about interior design.
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  #23  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 5:09 PM
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I'm not talking about interior design.
You are but you don't realize it. Art Nouveau and Baroque are classical 'architectural' styles that don't deal with space and tectonics but with decoration, which is what Interior Design serves to do today. Also, those styles aren't 'timeless' like Beaux-Arts Neoclassicsm seems to have become; they both emerged for a very brief time because of very specific and very poignant social and cultural factors, and then both died for the same reason--the people creating and funding projects in those styles realized they weren't good architecture that dealt with space in plan and section but with the application of paint and ornament, which isn't architecture.
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  #24  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 5:31 PM
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You are but you don't realize it. Art Nouveau and Baroque are classical 'architectural' styles that don't deal with space and tectonics but with decoration, which is what Interior Design serves to do today. Also, those styles aren't 'timeless' like Beaux-Arts Neoclassicsm seems to have become; they both emerged for a very brief time because of very specific and very poignant social and cultural factors, and then both died for the same reason--the people creating and funding projects in those styles realized they weren't good architecture that dealt with space in plan and section but with the application of paint and ornament, which isn't architecture.

And what schools specialize in teaching Baroque?
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  #25  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 5:55 PM
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application of paint and ornament, which isn't architecture.
Yes it is. Every bit as much as finding goofy shapes is architecture.

If you want to say it's part but not all of architecture, that's fine.
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  #26  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 6:32 PM
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Yes it is. Every bit as much as finding goofy shapes is architecture.

If you want to say it's part but not all of architecture, that's fine.
Any style of 'architecture' that sacrifices a tectonic exploration of space in the name of decoration is not architecture.

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Originally Posted by Hed Kandi View Post
And what schools specialize in teaching Baroque?
An apprenticeship with Gian Lorenzo Bernini or another contemporary leader in the Baroque architecture world would probably be the only way to really learn the style...
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Last edited by CGII; Dec 10, 2009 at 6:45 PM.
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  #27  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 6:46 PM
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Assume that I wanted a foundation in Historic Western Architecture, perhaps Art Nouveau or Baroque, where should I go?
University of Virginia.

What you are asking for will only be truly found in history classes though...because much of those practices can be studied that way...if you are looking for programs that have studios that focus to those styles, you will probably be sorely disappointed. In reference to music, first teaching one how to play and write music, you need to teach them the meaning of each note and the sound they make before teaching them any style of music...the Bachelors of Architecture is the practice of teaching the notes that you need to learn before you can begin to understand architecture...what you are wanting is best found in a Masters of Architecture program where you have more control over your own work and thesis, therefore you can then take your understanding of those notes that you have learned and apply them however you see fit.

If you are not willing to go through that process, then you might want to look into history degrees that focus on classical architecture and such. Architecture schools are very hard and very taxing, about 2 out of 3 people dont even make it past the first year. Then the entire time you are in studios, it feels like you are working a full time job that you are paying someone else for and getting very little sleep or human interaction outside of studio.

I mention University of Virginia because I know they still have a strong foundation in Colonial and Classical architecture, but even they are changing because of this push for sustainability in architecture and the need for the AIA to have every school practicing it.
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  #28  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 7:48 PM
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Unfortunately there arent many choices and I can not recommend any particular schools. We heard Notre Dame, Ive heard Yale. I went to Cal Poly and they definetely dont champion classical architecture. After school I spent alot of time studying classical archictecture on my own, perhaps internships with architects who specialize in classical architecture is the way to go, because there certainly are good ones out there.
You will have to figure it out.....but here are some good recources:

http://www.classicist.org/

On the construction and residential side:

http://www.traditional-building.com/
http://www.period-homes.com/

Anyone who slags off classical architecture is missing the boat. Its not as much about ornamentation as it is about scale & proportion, and learning the "language" of different architectural styles. You can not successfully design without learning the basics. Even good modernists employ classical scale and proportion.
And there are many good architects and designers doing great classical work today.
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Last edited by SLO; Dec 10, 2009 at 8:37 PM.
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  #29  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 8:33 PM
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Would it be best to take an undergrad in architectural history, and then finish the Masters program at Notre Dame?
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  #30  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 8:40 PM
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Any style of 'architecture' that sacrifices a tectonic exploration of space in the name of decoration is not architecture.
1. No, any style that does those things isn't architecture you approve of. Let's not mistake opinions for facts.

2. Providing for the importance of decoration does not mean a style inherently dismisses good use of space. Modernism is not inherently superior at use of space to traditionalism, nor vice versa.
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  #31  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 8:46 PM
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Would it be best to take an undergrad in architectural history, and then finish the Masters program at Notre Dame?
I have a number of collegues who have done exactly that (B.A. Arch History) and then gone on for an M.Arch. The M.Arch takes longer that way (3+ years instead of 2), but certainly a viable way to go.
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  #32  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 9:05 PM
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^^^I dont think that would be a bad way to go. Learning how to really draw and sketch for design oriented architects is so important. I know far to many architects who can not actually design anything.
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  #33  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 9:14 PM
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What would be the best undergrad schools for Architecture history?
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  #34  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 9:39 PM
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^^^I dont think that would be a bad way to go. Learning how to really draw and sketch for design oriented architects is so important. I know far to many architects who can not actually design anything.
That is such a sad truth, which is why I am much more into programs that are about design and spacial qualities. The schools that focus more on hand drawn work is so much better quality in the end than schools that focus all of their attention to computers...sad to say, but true.

I think it is University of Indiana that has an amazing history program, but I am not sure...I would have to ask a friend that went to one of those midwest colleges about that.
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  #35  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2009, 11:07 PM
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Would it be best to take an undergrad in architectural history, and then finish the Masters program at Notre Dame?
Notre Dame has the probably best program for a degree in tradition and classical architecture. I recommend you consider their BArch program.

After you graduate, you always have the option of supplementing your degree with some kind of an art history degree.

And when you say best, what does that mean? What college doesn't offer a great education? This idea of 'best' is kind of silly, especially for a liberal arts degree. Look at the school degree program and find what is best for YOU. Unless you want to have go to law school and have the name Harvard, Northwestern, or Yale or something... you can find a great history degree probably at whatever school is closest to you.

Are you in High School?
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  #36  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2009, 8:18 AM
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Notre Dame has the probably best program for a degree in tradition and classical architecture. I recommend you consider their BArch program.

After you graduate, you always have the option of supplementing your degree with some kind of an art history degree.

And when you say best, what does that mean? What college doesn't offer a great education? This idea of 'best' is kind of silly, especially for a liberal arts degree. Look at the school degree program and find what is best for YOU. Unless you want to have go to law school and have the name Harvard, Northwestern, or Yale or something... you can find a great history degree probably at whatever school is closest to you.

Are you in High School?
Also, the most important factor is visit these schools and see first hand what kind of program they teach, that is probably be the best bit of information you can get. We could go on forever trying to describe and name schools, but personal experience from visiting these schools is the only way to really get an idea for them.
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  #37  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2009, 2:53 PM
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^
This is true. Nothing you see on a website will be better than walking through the studio space, or speaking with a professor and looking at what's hanging on the walls.
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  #38  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2009, 9:10 PM
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I would imagine that the École des Beaux-Arts, if it's still around, is the best place to study traditional classical architecture, although their product is usually Neoclassical rather than Baroque or Gothic. As far as learning the traditional architecture styles in the Muslim world, Hindu world, and Far East, though, unless you're fluent in Arabic, Hindi, or Chinese (etc.) fieldwork's probably your best option.

EDIT: You're in luck! This is the official website of the École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts! http://www.ensba.fr/
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  #39  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2009, 7:57 PM
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You can probably write Denmark off your list. If anything I've seen so far is a guide, Danish architecture is sick of historicism. And as a guy who fell into architecture studies just 6 months ago, I advice you to take a break year before you enter(gather energy! ) and to take this quote very seriously:

"it feels like you are working a full time job that you are paying someone else for and getting very little sleep or human interaction outside of studio."
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  #40  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2009, 8:22 PM
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"it feels like you are working a full time job that you are paying someone else for and getting very little sleep or human interaction outside of studio."
That has to be the truest statement I have ever heard because I have said the same thing while working on a project at 3AM with barely enough sleep the past week to could for an 8hour night of sleep.
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