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  #41  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 12:41 AM
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The only fair comparison is Water Street in St. John's vs Water Street in Halifax.

I suggest we give q12 and Signal both a thermometer and anemometer and get them to take measurements at high noon each day all next winter on their respective Water Streets and get back to us with a full report.
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  #42  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 12:52 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
The only fair comparison is Water Street in St. John's vs Water Street in Halifax.

I suggest we give q12 and Signal both a thermometer and anemometer and get them to take measurements at high noon each day all next winter on their respective Water Streets and get back to us with a full report.
But it'll never work without a Stevenson screen!!

That's the reason why I never trust non-official weather stations. I have no idea what their set-up is.
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  #43  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 2:18 AM
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Get a grip.

Weather is very subjective. I've known many people who live in Vancouver because of the weather, preferring the cooler summers, and milder winters to the colder winter and hotter summer climates of the East, including people from Montreal, and who would rather die than go back, but it's usually more than that reason alone.
Yeah, it's subjective, but I have a very strong suspicion that the preening smugness about it not being quite so cold in January is a self-defense mechanism in reaction to how very depressing six months of rain is.

But the idea of anyone moving to Vancouver for the weather is so far-fetched as to be laughable, and I don't believe it for a second. I think you're exaggerating or outright lying about "many people" living in Vancouver precisely for the weather. It just doesn't add up (unless maybe you're talking about people from Winnipeg). Or you happen to know the only six people from Montreal in history who did this.

We've gone over this before ad infinitum on this forum, but it bears repeating in light of all this delusion. Let's be real here: people in Ontario or Quebec motivated by their dislike of cold weather do not move to Vancouver. Rather, they winter in Florida. They're a phenomenon called "snowbirds" for a reason. They're not "BC birds," or "Vancouver retirees." It just doesn't happen.

(Again, if you're talking about a plausible source of winter weather refugees then you're talking about the Prairies, but not southern Ontario).

On the other hand, the idea that people would move to Vancouver because the summers in Toronto and Montreal are too hot is so preposterous I can't believe you actually suggested this. I mean, sure, I bet there really are people who don't like summer weather that much, and prefer Vancouver in July, but an identifiable phenomenon that is measurably or anecdotally significant?

"Toronto's so hot in summer, I'm moving to Vancouver because it's not so hot." Said no one ever. Hilarious!

Last edited by rousseau; May 8, 2017 at 4:00 AM. Reason: grammar
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  #44  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 3:21 AM
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People moving to Vancouver just for the weather probably doesn't happen much, but it is definitely a contributing factor for a lot of people who move here from other parts of Canada. Though I agree that a lot of those people are probably from colder climates like the prairies or Northern Ontario, and they tend to be people who dislike cold winters and/or hot summers more than the average person.

However, people refusing to move from Vancouver because of weather is definitely a real thing, especially among born-and-raised Vancouverites. I've seen people dismiss the possibility of moving to any other region of Canada because coastal BC has the only acceptable climate in the country in their opinion, as well as many people that would be open to moving elsewhere but are intimidated by the thought of cold winters and/or hot summers.

It should also be noted that Vancouverites are generally some of the most temperature-sensitive people I've ever met and can be a bit dramatic about the weather - you'd think the rest of Canada had Winnipeg winters and Miami summers from the way some people talk about it...
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  #45  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 4:03 AM
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I would consider a move to coastal BC just to escape the continual heavy snowfalls from repeated nor'easters in the winter time and the marked delay in the arrival of spring every year here in the Maritimes.

East coasters are used to humid damp weather and prolonged periods of rainfall, so I don't think that aspect of the BC climate would faze me. I just don't like 450 cm of snow every freaking winter.........
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  #46  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 4:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Skygazer View Post
However, people refusing to move from Vancouver because of weather is definitely a real thing, especially among born-and-raised Vancouverites. I've seen people dismiss the possibility of moving to any other region of Canada because coastal BC has the only acceptable climate in the country in their opinion, as well as many people that would be open to moving elsewhere but are intimidated by the thought of cold winters and/or hot summers.
Now that does sound fairly plausible. Though I know tons of people from BC who've moved here, and they'll only admit to missing the mountains and the ocean if asked. The weather never comes into it.

I could definitely see how "mountains and ocean" would be cause for painful homesickness if you grew up with them. Heck, I only lived in Taiwan for six years of my adult life, and that was long ago, and I still feel pangs of regret at being away from this: https://www.google.ca/maps/@23.46310...7i13312!8i6656.
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  #47  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 4:11 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
I would consider a move to coastal BC just to escape the continual heavy snowfalls from repeated nor'easters in the winter time and the marked delay in the arrival of spring every year here in the Maritimes.

East coasters are used to humid damp weather and prolonged periods of rainfall, so I don't think that aspect of the BC climate would faze me. I just don't like 450 cm of snow every freaking winter.........
Not sure if you're exaggerating or not but 450 cm is nuts. I spent one winter in London ON and it snowed a tad over 200 cm, and that was too much for me. Of course that was also in 2014 so we never got any mild spells to melt it either which made it seem worse, but regardless twice that amount of snow is just insane.

It's one of the things that I can truthfully say I prefer about Alberta winters is the lack of big dumps of snow. Total annual snow is around the same as Toronto, but getting more than 10cm in one storm is rare. Of course the trade off is that it can snow from early October into May. And it generally stays on the ground all winter in Edmonton.
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  #48  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 5:36 AM
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Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
Yeah, it's subjective, but I have a very strong suspicion that the preening smugness about it not being quite so cold in January is a self-defense mechanism in reaction to how very depressing six months of rain is.

But the idea of anyone moving to Vancouver for the weather is so far-fetched as to be laughable, and I don't believe it for a second. I think you're exaggerating or outright lying about "many people" living in Vancouver precisely for the weather. It just doesn't add up (unless maybe you're talking about people from Winnipeg). Or you happen to know the only six people from Montreal in history who did this.

We've gone over this before ad infinitum on this forum, but it bears repeating in light of all this delusion. Let's be real here: people in Ontario or Quebec motivated by their dislike of cold weather do not move to Vancouver. Rather, they winter in Florida. They're a phenomenon called "snowbirds" for a reason. They're not "BC birds," or "Vancouver retirees." It just doesn't happen.

(Again, if you're talking about a plausible source of winter weather refugees then you're talking about the Prairies, but not southern Ontario).

On the other hand, the idea that people would move to Vancouver because the summers in Toronto and Montreal are too hot is so preposterous I can't believe you actually suggested this. I mean, sure, I bet there really are people who don't like summer weather that much, and prefer Vancouver in July, but an identifiable phenomenon that is measurably or anecdotally significant?

"Toronto's so hot in summer, I'm moving to Vancouver because it's not so hot." Said no one ever. Hilarious!
I grew up in Ontario and live in Vancouver. The things you scoff at are things I hear all the time as to why people choose to live here. A lot of people retire in BC because of the weather. The winters have periods where it rains often but it is not "6 months of rain". You're obviously going to continue to believe what you want but it's not based in lived reality here. Why that bothers you so much doesn't make sense to me.

There are subjective reasons to live anywhere. These are simply common reasons people have for living here.

Last edited by dreambrother808; May 8, 2017 at 6:02 AM.
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  #49  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 5:40 AM
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Originally Posted by middeljohn View Post
Not sure if you're exaggerating or not but 450 cm is nuts. I spent one winter in London ON and it snowed a tad over 200 cm, and that was too much for me. Of course that was also in 2014 so we never got any mild spells to melt it either which made it seem worse, but regardless twice that amount of snow is just insane.
It is an exaggeration. Moncton averages about 280 cm of snow annually. But then there are also weather stations in the Maritimes that get under 100 cm of snow (precipitation falls mostly as rain in the winter), which is probably the lowest you will find in the eastern half of the country.

I used to live in the suburbs south of Halifax near this weather station: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_...x,_Nova_Scotia

114 cm of snow annually, high temperatures averaging above freezing year-round, and over 100 hours of sunshine in January. It's hard to argue that that location has a severe winter climate by Canadian standards.
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  #50  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 5:49 AM
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Originally Posted by dreambrother808 View Post
I grew up in Ontario and live in Vancouver. The things you scoff at are things I hear all the time as reasons why people choose to live here. A lot of people retire in BC because of the weather. The winters have extended periods where it rains often but it is not "6 months of rain". You're obviously going to continue to believe what you want but it's not based in lived reality here. Why that bothers you so much is interesting.
Ontario also has grey and dreary winters. Toronto's roughly tied with Victoria and Vancouver is roughly tied with London ON when it comes to sunshine in the winter months.
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  #51  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 6:20 AM
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Originally Posted by dreambrother808 View Post
The winters have periods where it rains often but it is not "6 months of rain".
Oh, here we go. Too awesome. Seems like this gets hashed out now and then. Six months with precipitation well over 100 mm (and not in short bursts of thundershowers like here, but constant drizzle) is only not "six months of rain" when you're in denial. Or maybe you like rain.

Hey, you're ideally situated if you like rain. Good for you.

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Ontario also has grey and dreary winters. Toronto's roughly tied with Victoria and Vancouver is roughly tied with London ON when it comes to sunshine in the winter months.
It doesn't rain, though.
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  #52  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 10:11 AM
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It is an exaggeration. Moncton averages about 280 cm of snow annually. But then there are also weather stations in the Maritimes that get under 100 cm of snow (precipitation falls mostly as rain in the winter), which is probably the lowest you will find in the eastern half of the country.
Yes, 450cm is one of the outliers, but it FEELS more common when you live here.

25 years of snow in Moncton
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  #53  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 12:45 PM
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Moncton is definitely in the snow belt; much snowier than most of Nova Scotia or further down along the Fundy shore in New Brunswick.

One thing I can't quite get used to since moving to the Maritimes is what feels like a delayed spring. It's 10 degrees here in Halifax this morning, but you can see your breath, and there's a sharp, cold fogginess hanging in the air. I've been biking to work for the past couple of weeks, but I'm still wearing gloves every morning. Every year since moving here, this month rolls around and I think, "It's going to be June in a few weeks; this is ridiculous."

The warmer months are better here than in Ontario. It's hot, but generally without so much suffocating humidity, and the evenings cool off more. But it takes a long time to get into gear.
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  #54  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 1:05 PM
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Ask me about what a garbage amount of snow during the winter is like:

Average YYT snowfall per year: 335 cm

Spoiler alert: it blows.
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  #55  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 1:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Vorkuta View Post
Yes, 450cm is one of the outliers, but it FEELS more common when you live here.

25 years of snow in Moncton
It's the years with over 400 cm that really stick in your mind, or, a year like this year where we has three nor'easters in a one week time frame dropping about 115 cm of snow with little or no respite, or, the classic two day nor'easter in 1992 that dropped 165 cm of snow on the city.

By and large, the bad snow years are more frequent than the good snow years. It doesn't really matter that between the storms it's generally warm enough that there is daily melting. It's the constant shoveling that destroys your moral........
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  #56  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 2:40 PM
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I have to challenge the original poster's methodology here for "dispelling the myth that the West Coast is always rainy and wet" by attempting to compare volumes of precipitation between cities.

The volume of rain is seldom the thing people complain about with regards to either Vancouver or Victoria - it is the constant cloudiness and the ever present dribbling of rain that wears people down and refer to those climates as unpleasant (some would certainly say "brutal").

Compare a place like Miami, whose rainiest month is almost twice as rainy as Vancouver's rainiest month. If you are going by absolute precipitation volumes, you would assume that Miami would be the worse place to spend the month. Consider however, that the rainiest month in Vancouver sees more than 20 days of the month under a cloud of rain, compared to only 17.9 rainy days in Miami's month (which sees almost twice the volume of rain).

Consider also that in that month Miami has a glorious 262 hours of sunshine, which is nipping at the heel's of Vancouver's famously sunny and warm summers, which peak at 289.8 hours of sunshine (this is comparing the *most* rainy Miami month with the *least* rainy Vancouver month in terms of hours of sunshine).

By contrast, the least amount of sun Miami gets all year is 216 hours in a month in December, compared to a paltry 56.5 hours in Vancouver for the entire month (combined with again, 20 days on average of rain).

There is no "myth about the West coast of Canada being wet and rainy". It is a fact.

The summers, however, are some of the best in Canada. Sunny, very little rain, very comfortable temperatures (much more comfortable than Miami and Texas summers, for example). The winters, absolutely deserve their reputation for being soul crushingly brutally rainy, cloudy, and dreary. And I think anyone who lived through Vancouver's most recent winter season can attest to that. Fortunately, not every winter is as brutal as this one, and it will unlikely repeat itself to that degree over the next few years.
Absolutely correct. That's something that's easy to overlook when you're just looking at rainfall data. Some places get all their rain in 10-minute downpours of biblical proportions; it's the case for Florida for sure, based on being here during the "rainy" season at various times during the past few years.

For example, this time I've been here for about two months. It rained only twice... for about 10 minutes each time. The rest of the two months (i.e. two months minus about 20 minutes) were sunny. However, I'd bet that the total volume of rainfall (the streets and lawns were flooded, both times, though after the sun comes out it dries pretty quickly) would probably match two months' worth of drizzle....... on paper.
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  #57  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 2:55 PM
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BTW, this looks a lot more like the Weather thread than it does my intended "SSP Flora Discussion Thread for Canadians at home and expat" :p

If this keeps up, we might have to start a new one...
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  #58  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 3:00 PM
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Go to the Wikipedia page on Lethbridge, Alberta. There is a coloured chart showing an average high for every month of the year that is not below freezing.
You're aware that what this means is that the typical winter day in Lethbridge is still mostly below freezing, right? And that's the day - the typical nights are of course even further below the freezing point.

The southern Prairies have several common traits: they're somewhat dry year round, somewhat sunny by Canadian standards, they have hot summers, they have cold winters, but they get significantly less snow than the more humid climates of Eastern Canada. That's the Prairies in a nutshell.
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  #59  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 3:18 PM
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BTW, this looks a lot more like the Weather thread than it does my intended "SSP Flora Discussion Thread for Canadians at home and expat" :p

If this keeps up, we might have to start a new one...
That's because the most anyone can talk about is if they can read it off a thermometer. It reads like they don't actually experience the environment. It gets to the point that people can only do one thing: jockeying.

So hey guys, cut out the jockeying. Get your eye off the thermometers and actually observe what's going out there. Thermometers aren't telling you anything.
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  #60  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 3:34 PM
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I see your point, but can't fully agree; how can you possibly hope to resolve this kind of thing:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guy from St. John's View Post
I spent a winter in Cole Harbour and Dartmouth. And it was effing brutal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guy from Halifax View Post
I've also been to St. John's in winter and it was unbelievable how insanely brutal it was.
... without at least involving some thermometers?
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