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  #61  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 3:36 PM
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A SSP Classic: The Great Canadian "Man, I couldn't possibly endure living in the climate of your city!" Discussion Thread.

From an external point of view - imagine yourself discovering a online Danish discussion forum where Danes are all pointing out that the climates in the other Danes' hometowns are unbearably brutal and vice versa...
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  #62  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 3:56 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
A SSP Classic: The Great Canadian "Man, I couldn't possibly endure living in the climate of your city!" Discussion Thread.

From an external point of view - imagine yourself discovering a online Danish discussion forum where Danes are all pointing out that the climates in the other Danes' hometowns are unbearably brutal and vice versa...
Ah come on, don't you know how that extra half degree in winter averages or 100 hours more of sunshine can be all the difference!

On a serious note, it is amazing how Canadian will fight over the smallest difference in our climate - when the rest of the world thinks our weather sucks.

That said, I do remember this story - possibly the only time our crappy weather was used to attract immigrants!
Quote:
Family find their dream place in the gloom


Many families dream of emigrating to the sun but one family from South Africa have just realised their desire and moved to the wettest and cloudiest town in Canada.

The Viviers, who suffer from a life-threatening allergy to sunshine, have moved to Prince Rupert where appalling weather offers everything they crave - regularly overcast skies and 100 inches of rain, sleet and snow each year.
...
Back on the High Veldt in South Africa, the Viviers were forced to lead a near-nocturnal life. Of the four members of the family, three - Johannes and his two teenage children, Domonic, 18, and Heloise, 15 - suffer from the debilitating genetic disease porphyria.
...
With only 1,200 hours of sunshine a year (compared to Britain's average of 1,650 hours), Prince Rupert seemed ideal.
...
Link
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  #63  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 3:58 PM
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Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
Oh, here we go. Too awesome. Seems like this gets hashed out now and then. Six months with precipitation well over 100 mm (and not in short bursts of thundershowers like here, but constant drizzle) is only not "six months of rain" when you're in denial. Or maybe you like rain.

Hey, you're ideally situated if you like rain. Good for you.
Yes it rains more here. I am not arguing against that. The perception of what that is like can really only be compared by those who have lived in both places.

The drizzle is not constant, a rainy day often includes long periods of no rain and sunshine. Vancouver gets bright sunshine 41% of its total daylight hours. Toronto only gets 3% more, at 44%,which is the exact same as Victoria.

Your bombast invites argument, as per usual. Try a more balanced delivery that takes into account your inexperience.

https://www.currentresults.com/Weath...al-average.php
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  #64  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 4:11 PM
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Originally Posted by mcminsen
Go to the Wikipedia page on Lethbridge, Alberta. There is a coloured chart showing an average high for every month of the year that is not below freezing.
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
You're aware that what this means is that the typical winter day in Lethbridge is still mostly below freezing, right? And that's the day - the typical nights are of course even further below the freezing point.

The southern Prairies have several common traits: they're somewhat dry year round, somewhat sunny by Canadian standards, they have hot summers, they have cold winters, but they get significantly less snow than the more humid climates of Eastern Canada. That's the Prairies in a nutshell.
What was being explained is that there are only maybe a few weather stations in Canada East of the Rockies that have year round day time average highs that aren't freezing, they just happen to almost all be on The Prairies, Thats something people in Eastern half of country tend to forget (conveniently over look) when they think of Prairie Winters.

The whole point is The entire Prairies can't really be encapsulated in a couple of sentences, It wasn't long ago I had to explain thunderstorms & what Hail is when a SSP forumer not from The Priairies was posting 'ice falling from the sky in the middle of Summer in The Prairies!!' & then had to explain this happens in places like Bangledesh too.

Snow is another thing, I can count on my fingers the number of minutes per year I have to shovel/sweep snow off my driveway with a broom, thats why the thought of 450cm or 14 feet of snow that can fall in other parts of Canada is just incomprehensible to me.
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  #65  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 4:38 PM
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Originally Posted by SaskScraper View Post
What was being explained is that there are only maybe a few weather stations in Canada East of the Rockies that have year round day time average highs that aren't freezing, they just happen to almost all be on The Prairies, Thats something people in Eastern half of country tend to forget (conveniently over look) when they think of Prairie Winters.

The whole point is The entire Prairies can't really be encapsulated in a couple of sentences, It wasn't long ago I had to explain thunderstorms & what Hail is when a SSP forumer not from The Priairies was posting 'ice falling from the sky in the middle of Summer in The Prairies!!' & then had to explain this happens in places like Bangledesh too.

Snow is another thing, I can count on my fingers the number of minutes per year I have to shovel/sweep snow off my driveway with a broom, thats why the thought of 450cm or 14 feet of snow that can fall in other parts of Canada is just incomprehensible to me.
Uhhh....what?

St. John's may only get 3 or 4 thunderstorms in a year, most not severe, but even I've seen hail fall (albeit in thunderstorms where I grew up on the south coast). Even if I had never seen it before, don't schools teach this kind of stuff in like....fourth grade?
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  #66  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 5:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post
Uhhh....what?

St. John's may only get 3 or 4 thunderstorms in a year, most not severe, but even I've seen hail fall (albeit in thunderstorms where I grew up on the south coast). Even if I had never seen it before, don't schools teach this kind of stuff in like....fourth grade?
I'm not sure if it's taught in schools or not, growing up on The Prairies you just know about them through experience. That and knowing to run to the cellar if you see/hear signs of a twister coming, it's the only weather event that could occur at night that I'd have nightmares of.. well that and Yellowstone exploding (its not due for another 5 million years) but I have a very vivid imagination..haha ¯\(ツ)/¯
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  #67  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 5:45 PM
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Originally Posted by SaskScraper View Post
What was being explained is that there are only maybe a few weather stations in Canada East of the Rockies that have year round day time average highs that aren't freezing, they just happen to almost all be on The Prairies, Thats something people in Eastern half of country tend to forget (conveniently over look) when they think of Prairie Winters.

The whole point is The entire Prairies can't really be encapsulated in a couple of sentences, It wasn't long ago I had to explain thunderstorms & what Hail is when a SSP forumer not from The Priairies was posting 'ice falling from the sky in the middle of Summer in The Prairies!!' & then had to explain this happens in places like Bangledesh too.

Snow is another thing, I can count on my fingers the number of minutes per year I have to shovel/sweep snow off my driveway with a broom, thats why the thought of 450cm or 14 feet of snow that can fall in other parts of Canada is just incomprehensible to me.
Avg lows below freezing for 7 months in the year. That's incomprehensible to me.
I don't care that the temperature climbed to +0.3C at 3:03PM on that day when it's brutally cold for more than 70% of the time (and nights in the Prairies are longer than in Eastern Canada).
Love it when people from the Prairies ignore avg lows when in fact they are a better indication of how cold it is during the long winter nights.
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  #68  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 6:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
A SSP Classic: The Great Canadian "Man, I couldn't possibly endure living in the climate of your city!" Discussion Thread.

From an external point of view - imagine yourself discovering a online Danish discussion forum where Danes are all pointing out that the climates in the other Danes' hometowns are unbearably brutal and vice versa...
Yeah, you're more right on what's going on here. Good catch.
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  #69  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 6:48 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
I see your point, but can't fully agree; how can you possibly hope to resolve this kind of thing:

... without at least involving some thermometers?
You might not be able to resolve it conclusively but I think a knowledge of weather dynamics and geography provides some clues.

Are there a lot of places in the northern hemisphere where you would find that the climate got milder after moving northeast along the same coast (300-400 km north in meridian distance)?
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  #70  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 7:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
A SSP Classic: The Great Canadian "Man, I couldn't possibly endure living in the climate of your city!" Discussion Thread.

From an external point of view - imagine yourself discovering a online Danish discussion forum where Danes are all pointing out that the climates in the other Danes' hometowns are unbearably brutal and vice versa...
You have to feel sort of sorry for Canada. We're the second biggest country on earth, but all of our different regions have winters that are miserable in different ways. It is not unrealistic for every square inch of this 10 million square km country to be below 0 on a January day. AFAIK, we don't have anywhere with a plant hardiness above 8a.

I guess Russia has the same conundrum, but most of the other physically enormous countries - and some small ones - have enough climatic variation within their borders in the direction that counts (i.e. a January daytime high contrast between -5 to +25, not +5 to -25.).
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  #71  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 7:47 PM
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I still like the idea of Canada absorbing a manageably-sized Caribbean island, although I guess it would just turn into a resort for international plutocrats.
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  #72  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 7:56 PM
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I still like the idea of Canada absorbing a manageably-sized Caribbean island, although I guess it would just turn into a resort for international plutocrats.
Wasn't there some drive to annex the Turks and Caicos?
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  #73  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 9:08 PM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
You have to feel sort of sorry for Canada. We're the second biggest country on earth, but all of our different regions have winters that are miserable in different ways. It is not unrealistic for every square inch of this 10 million square km country to be below 0 on a January day. AFAIK, we don't have anywhere with a plant hardiness above 8a.

I guess Russia has the same conundrum, but most of the other physically enormous countries - and some small ones - have enough climatic variation within their borders in the direction that counts (i.e. a January daytime high contrast between -5 to +25, not +5 to -25.).
Russia has Sochi which beats any region in Canada both in winter and summer. Plant hardiness 8b/9a.



Canada is unique in regards to crappy weather.
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  #74  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 9:13 PM
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Of all places they chose the least winterly city in the country to host the winter olympics.
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  #75  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 9:35 PM
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There are a few places in Canada including castlegar who's record high is higher than Sochis. But not plant hardiness don't think. Metro knows more about that than me.
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  #76  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 10:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Nicko999 View Post
Avg lows below freezing for 7 months in the year. That's incomprehensible to me.
I don't care that the temperature climbed to +0.3C at 3:03PM on that day when it's brutally cold for more than 70% of the time (and nights in the Prairies are longer than in Eastern Canada).
Love it when people from the Prairies ignore avg lows when in fact they are a better indication of how cold it is during the long winter nights.
Yep. Let's just cut the bullshit. Daily mean temps for the whole year.

Vancouver: 10.4 C
Toronto: 9.4 C
Halifax: 7.5 C
Montreal: 7.4 C
Maple Creek: 5.8 C (what happened??)
Calgary: 4.4 C
Winnipeg: 3.0 C

The end. Prairie cities have frigid nights YEAR ROUND. Calgary doesn't crack double digit lows in any month of the year.
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  #77  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 10:25 PM
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Yep. Let's just cut the bullshit. Daily mean temps for the whole year.

Vancouver: 10.4 C
Toronto: 9.4 C
Halifax: 7.5 C
Montreal: 7.4 C
Maple Creek: 5.8 C (what happened??)
Calgary: 4.4 C
Winnipeg: 3.0 C
So I guess Vancouver is the "warmest" city in Canada?
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  #78  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 11:28 PM
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Oh, here we go. Too awesome. Seems like this gets hashed out now and then. Six months with precipitation well over 100 mm (and not in short bursts of thundershowers like here, but constant drizzle) is only not "six months of rain" when you're in denial. Or maybe you like rain.
Toronto is actually much gloomier than it's reputation. I was shocked on moving here how often it is grey and overcast when everyone mocked me for being from dreary Vancouver.

To put it into numbers Toronto gets 2,066 sunshine hours a year whereas Vancouver gets 1,937 sunshine hours per year.

That would mean that Vancouver as 94% as sunny as Toronto, not really that big a difference.

Only major difference i suppose would be that Vancouver has most of those dreary days during the winter whereas Toronto's are a bit more evenly spread. I personally would prefer to get the cloudy dreary weather out of the way during the winter when the temps are low anyway, and have sunnier summers, but the lack of sun in the winters can be trying.

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Originally Posted by Nicko999 View Post
Russia has Sochi which beats any region in Canada both in winter and summer. Plant hardiness 8b/9a.
Fairly certain coastal Vancouver has a plan hardiness of 9a as well and Victoria is even better with big portions of 9b.

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So I guess Vancouver is the "warmest" city in Canada?
I believe that is Victoria, but yes of that list it is.
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  #79  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 11:35 PM
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So I guess Vancouver is the "warmest" city in Canada?
More like mildest... 10C cannot be considered as warm.
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  #80  
Old Posted May 8, 2017, 11:43 PM
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I made this thread years ago and feel I have matured a little since then, but I just want to clarify the statement that it is not always wet on the West Coast.

Of course it rains a lot, and the winter has a lot of drizzle, but it really does feel that many believe that the weather is monotonous throughout the year. It is not, there is a clear dry season.

Also, the point was more that the west coast itself is not monotonous. Victoria especially is sunnier and drier than many would imagine east of the Rockies. Receiving less rainfall and more sunshine hours than Toronto and Montreal.

The stats are pretty clear on that. No menacing subtext in this, just an interesting misconception I see often throughout Canada (and is still showing itself on this very thread)
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