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  #81  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2008, 11:01 PM
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Just because there is a stop there, doesn't mean that ALL the trains need to stop there...

There could be direct trains and trains that pass through a couple of other stations.

BTW, I think that there should be a MTL-Niagra (via Hamilton) line and a Windsor-QC (via Ottawa and Pearson) line.

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  #82  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2008, 1:51 AM
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Originally Posted by SteelTown View Post
I think the high speed train will likely skip over Hamilton. Probably go from London to K/W to the GTA.
this is my fear. 150 years ago cities/towns were made or broke depending on where rail lines located.

If Hamilton has any political influence left it needs to use it to make sure its included in the corridor.
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  #83  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2008, 3:57 AM
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Originally Posted by GreatTallNorth2 View Post
Anyone that knows anything about high speed rail knows that Toronto would not have 3 stops (Pearson, Toronto, East Toronto). Hello? That defeats the purpose of HIGH speed rail. The less stops the better - Windsor, London, Kitchener, Toronto, Kingston, Ottawa, Montreal and Q.C. Don't even think about adding another stop.
Its possible to have both "regular" and "express" services run along the line. All you need to do is 4 track a small section at each station. The inside tracks run straight ahead without stopping, the outside tracks allow trains to decelerate and stop at the station. They then accelerate back up to a decent speed, and merge with the express tracks.

Problem solved.
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  #84  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2008, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It probably has more to do with the fact that Bombardier has been a partner on some of the TGV projects in France, than anything regarding Canada and France having an official language in common.
Ah, yes! Which brings us back to the hydrogen trains McGuinty promised Bombardier Thunder Bay would manufacture, back during the election. He hasn't mentioned them again since.

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Originally Posted by realcity View Post
this is my fear. 150 years ago cities/towns were made or broke depending on where rail lines located.
Times were different then. If Hamilton is skipped, KW will likely grow even faster, but Hamilton isn't going to "die".

Toronto, KW and Hamilton form a triangle. If this line is coming from Windsor and London, Hamilton will most likely be skipped.
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  #85  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2008, 3:56 PM
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Originally Posted by realcity View Post
this is my fear. 150 years ago cities/towns were made or broke depending on where rail lines located.

If Hamilton has any political influence left it needs to use it to make sure its included in the corridor.
Hamilton and Kitchener/Pearson would be on two separate corridors. Pearson would undoubtedly be served before Hamilton because connecting major airports is an essential part of any high speed line's business plan. High speed trains would all but replace connecting flights in the Corridor, just as they have in Europe. Regardless, even if HSR gets built in this country it'll be a long long time before either city gets served. But in the meantime Hamilton will be much better connected than Kitchener since the Lakeshore Line is getting electrified with all-day service.
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  #86  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2008, 5:25 PM
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BTW, It would take around 4 hours non-stop to go from QCity to Detroit via Ottawa and Kitchener.

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  #87  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2008, 5:49 PM
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Originally Posted by vid View Post
Ah, yes! Which brings us back to the hydrogen trains McGuinty promised Bombardier Thunder Bay would manufacture, back during the election. He hasn't mentioned them again since.



Times were different then. If Hamilton is skipped, KW will likely grow even faster, but Hamilton isn't going to "die".

Toronto, KW and Hamilton form a triangle. If this line is coming from Windsor and London, Hamilton will most likely be skipped.
If no one wants to buy a hydrogen train, and it doesn't really make any sense to do it when the energy loss for the generation of hydrogen would likely pay for electrification over 10 years (or even less). I could see building two brand new or Canadianized trainsets in the next ten years, one to replace the standard Via rolling stock, and one to build furnish HSR.

Phasing would likely have the line do a Pearson - Union - Dorval - Montreal route first, with other non-express stops along the route. It is the logical first step. Stopping there at first would free up some cash to support the provinces building feeder networks in Toronto and Montreal aswell.
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  #88  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2008, 1:24 AM
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I don't think HSR is really needed between Hamilton and Toronto as the distance is too short. The train would never get to full speed and the time difference between a high speed and an upgraded normal train would be minimal. If there was separate line to Niagara, that would be another story.
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  #89  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2008, 2:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Kitchissippi View Post
I don't think HSR is really needed between Hamilton and Toronto as the distance is too short. The train would never get to full speed and the time difference between a high speed and an upgraded normal train would be minimal. If there was separate line to Niagara, that would be another story.
I disagree! The Netherlands has built a high-speed route through their country and the distances there are definitely short! There should be two high-speed routes in that region Toronto-Hamilton-St. Catherines- Niagara Falls, and Kitchener-Cambridge-Brampton-Hamilton(connections to Niagara)-Welland-Buffalo.

Imagine what an amazing impact that would have on the tourist industry and the employment industry. You could live in one city and use services in other cities. It would really knit the communities together!
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  #90  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2008, 2:54 AM
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Just as it gets up to speed, it has to stop again. Like a city bus!
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  #91  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2008, 3:29 AM
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The Kitchener-Buffalo route would be better as Kitchener/Cambridge instead of Kitchener-Cambridge. The latter will be covered by light rail in a few years (presumably), and the distance is far too short to make it worthwhile. A station somewhere between the two, perhaps near the airport, wouldn't be a bad idea though!
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  #92  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2008, 3:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitchissippi View Post
I don't think HSR is really needed between Hamilton and Toronto as the distance is too short. The train would never get to full speed and the time difference between a high speed and an upgraded normal train would be minimal. If there was separate line to Niagara, that would be another story.
They could build a tunnel under Lake Ontario. Or a catapult... that would be cooler.
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  #93  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2008, 6:39 AM
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Why not go through Peterborough? It would be more direct than having a station at Kingston and would restore rail service to the town. Although, is there the population to justify favouring Peterborough over Kingston?

There should also be a second high speed rail service built between Toronto and Buffalo via Hamilton and Niagara Falls. This would connect Toronto directly with the Empire Corridor and also provide access to airports in Buffalo.

I'm including a Google Map depicting high speed rail corridors and local VIA service along the Windsor-Quebec City corridor.
http://maps.google.ca/maps/ms?ie=UTF...55d0a38d5a&z=6

Last edited by dunkalunk; Nov 19, 2008 at 7:01 AM. Reason: http://maps.google.ca/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=112509077600247168599.00045b7670b55d0a38d5a&z=6
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  #94  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2008, 12:20 PM
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Metrolinx is on track to have the Lakeshore Line electrified with 10 years so that will help. Eventually Metrolinx would like to see the Lakeshore Line extend down to the Niagara Region so perhaps we could have a HSR line from the Niagara Region to Hamilton.
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  #95  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2008, 1:50 PM
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I travelled on high speed rail in Italy...and the stations were not that far apart. For instance, Bologna to Florence is maybe 100 kms (and there was at least 1 stop along the way).
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  #96  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2008, 8:49 PM
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I am a student and I am conducting a marketing proposal for the viability of a high speed train system between Quebec City and Windsor. While conducting my research, I have been having trouble finding information on the capital costs and operating costs for the Bombardier Jet train technology. I am also trying to find the costs of upgrading the rail infrastructure to handle the high speed trains.
I would really appreciate it if anyone could provide any information they have. The numbers don’t have to be exact, but if I could at least receive an estimate that would be very helpful.
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  #97  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2008, 10:24 PM
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The more and more I think about HST for not only the Edmonton-Calgary corridor but the Windsor-Quebec City, I think that a Transrapid Maglev would be the best option. If only because it can operate commercially at 430-500 km/h and has the highest overall future potential for service growth, since trains could carry 1100 people at once, compared to roughly half that for a TGV style service. Don't get me wrong a TGV wouldn't be bad and it is a proven technology but a Maglev would be that much quicker and quieter...
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  #98  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2008, 11:57 PM
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Like the government to stop wasting my money. If its a good idea, let private business do it. Of course, nowadays, they'll just let private business do it, then bail them out when they fail...so what the heck. Hope we all enjoy our 21st Century 'fall of the Roman Empire'.
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  #99  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2008, 12:04 AM
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The first high speed electrics in Canada will be on the GO Transit line on the Lakeshore Line. The groundwork has already started to electrify the rails from Oshawa to Hamilton. The Lakeshore line is the only place in Canada that makes sense, I mean you have 8 Million people living in a fairly confined (for Canadian standards) area.

so......

......Hamilton will get High Speed Rail, before Windsor, Kitchener Ottawa, or Quebec City.
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  #100  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2008, 1:18 AM
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Originally Posted by canucklehead2 View Post
The more and more I think about HST for not only the Edmonton-Calgary corridor but the Windsor-Quebec City, I think that a Transrapid Maglev would be the best option. If only because it can operate commercially at 430-500 km/h and has the highest overall future potential for service growth, since trains could carry 1100 people at once, compared to roughly half that for a TGV style service. Don't get me wrong a TGV wouldn't be bad and it is a proven technology but a Maglev would be that much quicker and quieter...
Though I would LOVE to see that happen, you must factor in costs...

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