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  #61  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 4:22 PM
P. Alouishous P. Alouishous is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giallo View Post
You're right. They way that guy says "man" is very Metro Vancouver. Funny enough, despite Kelowna (the Okanagan Valley, really) being so close, and so influenced by Vancouver, we don't pronounce "man" like that at all. It's definitely a Lower Mainland thing.
I hear the short 'a' as across all of Western Canada - from Manitoba to BC. Although maybe there are subtle differences between regions that I don't hear.
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  #62  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 5:31 PM
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I've trying to focus on how I say about, from what I can conclude I pronounce it abaut (like how you would say Audi). It's not as pronounced as abowt, but not quite abawt either, somewhere in between.

However I'm an immigrant so I do pronounce some words slightly differently.
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  #63  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 5:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P. Alouishous View Post
Rural Ontario accent:

Video Link
Slow this down to about half-speed and make the diphthongs a bit longer, and you've got a rural Northern Ontario accent.
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  #64  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 5:50 PM
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Three examples. I chose them because they're among my favourite local words/phrases, but also because all three of these folks have different accents.

This guy is definitely from St. John's:

Video Link


This guy is definitely from Placentia Bay (it's my favourite of Newfoundland's accents. VERY Irish, and such a lovely sing-song way of talking):

Video Link


And this woman, I suspect, spent many years on the mainland. I can't place her accent locally at all:

Video Link
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Last edited by SignalHillHiker; Jan 26, 2014 at 6:09 PM.
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  #65  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 6:03 PM
middeljohn middeljohn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P. Alouishous View Post
Rural Ontario accent:

Video Link
Nice find. That's what I was trying to describe in my opening post. You just have drive about 20 minutes out of London before you start hearing this.
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  #66  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 6:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P. Alouishous View Post
Rural Ontario accent:

Video Link
Exaggerated intonation for comic effect but his pronunciation sounded fine to my ear, but then he's an actor from Listowel, not far from K-W.
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  #67  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 7:01 PM
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This video has a good number of people speaking in the rural Alberta accent. Pay attention to the way they pronounce "farm" and the way a lot of them (but not all of them, as you will see) insert "ah" unstead of "uh" or "uhm" in their pauses.

Video Link


This video shows the differences between the urban Alberta accent (used by the newscasts) and the rural Alberta accents (from the residents in High River). You'll note how much faster people from the city talk and how we clip our vowels more.
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  #68  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 7:17 PM
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Thanks for the videos on this page. You can really hear the difference between the rural west and rural Ontario, even if the Ontario video is played up for effect.

I'm starting to understand why people in the west think of the "hoser" accent as an Ontario thing.
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  #69  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 7:46 PM
P. Alouishous P. Alouishous is offline
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I'm grateful to rural residents and lower socioeconomic groups for providing some regional variability in accents. Without them, all of Canada and the US would sound the same and that would be way too boring.
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  #70  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 7:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kool maudit View Post
personal "about" confession time: in the mid-2000s, my parents moved to southern california. when i visited one time, someone noted that my mom was outed-as-canadian when they played tennis; the "that's out!" just sounded different.

around that time, i made an unpatriotic decision to flatten my "ou" pronunciation so as to align with the american norm. embedded in this not-true-to-myself-or-my-history decision were the "jarring" factor outlined above, the fact that my ears were more comfortable with the american "out" (even if my tongue was not), and the concern that my accent may have been altered/intensified by my family's time in the maritimes (a region whose speech patterns i do not find congenial).

all of this is to say: it's hard! the vowel thing is deep and persistent! from about 2005 to 2008, i probably used both pronunciations, depending on how front-of-mind my odd personal elocution-struggle was. it would have been weirder and more jarring to hear, probably, than any single pronunciation in the english language. for a while, i think it even got too midwestern ("see you tamaaahrow"), and needed to be reined in along that metric.

the canadian "out," for whatever reason, is a major component of our dialect and the version of the english language by which i have largely been surrounded (in london, toronto, halifax, montreal, and ottawa) since birth. if you consciously attempt, as actors and newscasters and bad canadians like me have had to, to replace it with the american variant, you will find that it takes a lot of time and mindfulness, and that the only reward is people thinking you're from wisconsin or something.

if our accent was more broadly different than the u.s. norm, we might be proud of it. as it is, it can seem like a tic. tics are awkward and undesirable, and so (it would seem) is our poor, unwanted "out."
I learned English with English Canadians so I have a devil of a time trying to say about in any way other than the Canadian one.
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  #71  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 7:52 PM
middeljohn middeljohn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P. Alouishous View Post
Rural Ontario accent:

Video Link
Here is the non-exaggerated accent of rural Ontario. This is pretty much exactly how it sounds. This is one of the actors in the video P. Alouishous posted.

Video Link
[/QUOTE]
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  #72  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 8:03 PM
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His Os are either pronounced freakishly strongly (OhntariOoo) or like As (hahkey). I wonder how they decide which is which?
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  #73  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 8:29 PM
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Originally Posted by softee View Post
Believe it or not, this is accurate for a sizeable segment of Toronto's population.
Video Link

This way of speaking is real. I was visiting Calgary and went to a footlocker or Champs at the Chinook mall and a Philipino kid helping me had this accent. I asked if he was from Toronto just for the heck of it and he said he was from Scarborough and moved to Calgary a year prior.
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  #74  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 10:06 PM
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Here is Kardinal Offishal, born and raised in Toronto. The Afro-Caribbean accent in Toronto is real, and it's not just first generation Jamaican immigrants. Pretty cool. If you watch more of those "Real Toronto" videos, a few of the born-and-raised Torontonians have the Caribbean influence in their accents. Others sound like the "What people from Toronto sound like" video. Even in Oakville you hear the latter (but not the Caribbean).

Video Link
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  #75  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 10:37 PM
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Not saying he represents all Torontonians, but Rob Ford's accent sounds pretty typical for someone from his city to my ears.
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  #76  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 11:23 PM
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A couple of BC examples.

Castanet is a great source for this kind of thing. It's an online new show based out of Kelowna.

Small town BC

Video Link



Kelowna kids

Video Link



I went to high school with the organizer of the event.

Video Link
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  #77  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 11:31 PM
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I don't know, I really don't notice much difference at all in many of the videos you guys are posting. I think dialect is much more variable than accents are across Canada.
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  #78  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 11:42 PM
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That's so strange to me. The differences are obvious to my ears. That rural Ontario accent could be the opposite end of the world from the Placentia Bay one.
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  #79  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2014, 11:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
That's so strange to me. The differences are obvious to my ears. That rural Ontario accent could be the opposite end of the world from the Placentia Bay one.
They're obviously different, but not in the same way that a southern or northeastern US accent is. The Okanagan videos is more or less exactly how I talk.
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  #80  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2014, 12:10 AM
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I don't find a southern U.S. accent to be any further removed from how I talk than that rural Ontario one. They're both way, way off.

And accents can be similar in some ways and still sound completely different - like Baltimore, Boston, and NYC.
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