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  #81  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 4:22 PM
babypie babypie is offline
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Originally Posted by citywatch View Post
You came off inadvertently sarcastic....as though you were being tongue in cheek....when you mentioned places in the desert instead of at least Samo, which, for what it is, has been one of the few sections of the LA area associated with revived urbanism. An area of rather old bdlgs that fell apart around 50 yrs ago but has since been brought back to life. An even better example would be old town pasadena, where certain bldgs as old as the ones on broadway in dtla have been cleaned up through the yrs & allowed once dormant streets to bustle again.

the problem is not the old bldgs, particularly the larger beaux arts ones, but their owners &, in some cases, also the tenants....like the swapmeets on broadway. The owners managing their properties like slumlords are the ones that need to be removed, not the bldgs they own.

the point you were trying to make would have been clearer if you had also cited cities like this one....



sf.streetblog.org


^ many of the streets there have a variety of bldgs as old as or even older than what you'll find on broadway. But most of them have been well maintained thru the yrs, or are now properly maintained, & continue to attract ppl who have plenty of cash or credit cards in their wallets or purses, in spite of that city having its fair share of homeless ppl or aggressive panhandlers. btw, a tourist from britain was recently murdered in that city by reportedly a couple of street urchins, so it's not all that safe too. But cuz it's not as grungy as dtla is, or has been, it never lost a major connection to ppl who in LA's case have run off to the burbs or hoods like samo or pasadena.
no, people here are trying to read too much into what I'm saying. I won't say who but someone I know who carries a certain amount of clout said something to the tune that trashy looks (namely grafitti) attracts certain kinds of people and so it is removed

and in the same way, people don't like living near alleys as they tend to bring in undesirables

IMO much of the historic section is outdated and cannot be saved (should not be saved?) from the wrecking ball
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  #82  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 4:23 PM
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Originally Posted by 202_Cyclist View Post
My suggestion is just to ignore 'babypie.' He/she is a troll. It is not worth your time responding.
Now now, let's not be peace breakers but peace MAKERS
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  #83  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 4:50 PM
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Originally Posted by colemonkee View Post
^ Oh man, did you wander into the wrong forum...
More like he landed on the wrong planet.
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  #84  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 5:34 PM
BigCityOfDreams BigCityOfDreams is offline
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I have been reading this page for several years now, stumbled upon it from SSP, and have been a big fan since. Finally feel like it is time for me to chime in on the conversation at hand. The point that I hope that is being made is that the two go hand and hand: old buildings and the raw urban experience. Every few pages the conversation digresses back to the same thing: all the swapmeets and the grittiness is bringing LA down etc. I can not disagree more. What is it that you think is making DTLA so popular? Is its location on a tip of a pennensula or on an island? No, its the fact that LA is one of the last uncharted urban experiences in the USA. It is not sterile, it is not mall-ified, it is raw and it provides an experience that people are fleeing from the suburbs. Some of the most activated places in the united states are streets like Winston, Santee Alley and Los Angeles Streets, those places offer an experience that can not be replicated and they make LA a place where no two days will ever be the same. Long live LA, the greatest City on earth, an I hope that it never becomes as sterile boring and exclusive as Old Pass or downtown Santa Monica.
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  #85  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 6:47 PM
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Originally Posted by BigCityOfDreams View Post
I have been reading this page for several years now, stumbled upon it from SSP, and have been a big fan since. Finally feel like it is time for me to chime in on the conversation at hand. The point that I hope that is being made is that the two go hand and hand: old buildings and the raw urban experience. Every few pages the conversation digresses back to the same thing: all the swapmeets and the grittiness is bringing LA down etc. I can not disagree more. What is it that you think is making DTLA so popular? Is its location on a tip of a pennensula or on an island? No, its the fact that LA is one of the last uncharted urban experiences in the USA. It is not sterile, it is not mall-ified, it is raw and it provides an experience that people are fleeing from the suburbs. Some of the most activated places in the united states are streets like Winston, Santee Alley and Los Angeles Streets, those places offer an experience that can not be replicated and they make LA a place where no two days will ever be the same. Long live LA, the greatest City on earth, an I hope that it never becomes as sterile boring and exclusive as Old Pass or downtown Santa Monica.
let us appreciate the fact that there is a diversity of opinion

and since that is the case, I cannot dissagree with those who see otherwise

Might I add that DT Pasadena and Santa Monica are two of my favorites

especially Santa Monica with its superb outdoor mall and just down the stair, the ocean!

only problem with santa monica is the traffic and congestion which DTLA does not have so much of

As for greater Palm Springs or Coachella, which I mistakenly referred to as "the gem of California"

I meant the "jewel" of california as its beautiful desert floor is surrounded on three sides by the most dramatic geology to the north AND south AND west

simply THEE BEST!

on the downside, the summer heat seems to drive everyone indoors to do who knows what, and the valley seems to take on a feeling of barreness
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  #86  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 6:47 PM
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This conversation topic is potentially heading in the wrong direction. Changing gears.

Great job with the new thread Mojeda. One of the best people for the job.

What exactly is going on with 888 hope/park tower? Some people are saying it broke ground finally, some are saying its a false alarm. I haven't been able to keep up with the updates lately. Work has me cross country more often lately.

Am I the only one a little disappointed with the final product of glass tower?
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  #87  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 6:50 PM
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888 s.Hope

I am a bit confused.
Someone mentioned that 888 S.Hope has a false groundbreaking.
So did 888 s. Hope break ground or no. and If not then what is that work being done in that plot?
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  #88  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 7:03 PM
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^^^ yeah, I am a bit confused as well. I went to the old thread to see if I missed anything before I logged in. Resident was the first to say it broke ground. Others said it didn't, some on SSC were quick to say no. reading commentary on other sites, some say its more soil testing, some say they found storage tanks or something.

Anyone actually know what's going on with that one?
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  #89  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 9:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityOfDreams View Post
I have been reading this page for several years now, stumbled upon it from SSP, and have been a big fan since. Finally feel like it is time for me to chime in on the conversation at hand. The point that I hope that is being made is that the two go hand and hand: old buildings and the raw urban experience. Every few pages the conversation digresses back to the same thing: all the swapmeets and the grittiness is bringing LA down etc. I can not disagree more. What is it that you think is making DTLA so popular? Is its location on a tip of a pennensula or on an island? No, its the fact that LA is one of the last uncharted urban experiences in the USA. It is not sterile, it is not mall-ified, it is raw and it provides an experience that people are fleeing from the suburbs. Some of the most activated places in the united states are streets like Winston, Santee Alley and Los Angeles Streets, those places offer an experience that can not be replicated and they make LA a place where no two days will ever be the same. Long live LA, the greatest City on earth, an I hope that it never becomes as sterile boring and exclusive as Old Pass or downtown Santa Monica.
People who think homelessness = grittiness or authenticity need get out of the their bubble. You're really nothing but a misery tourist. I'm glad they're there to validate your sense of urban adventure.
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  #90  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 9:43 PM
BigCityOfDreams BigCityOfDreams is offline
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Originally Posted by brudy View Post
People who think homelessness = grittiness or authenticity need get out of the their bubble. You're really nothing but a misery tourist. I'm glad they're there to validate your sense of urban adventure.
apparently you didn't read my post Brudy... My point stands that the grit and rawness of Downtown Los Angeles are one of the key variables leading to its renaissance, and should be embraced ... The same thing that many here seem to want: a clean sterile downtown are the exact things that have left Brooklyn cooler than Manhattan, and Oakland cooler than SF, and on the adverse have left the sterile shells of cities past elitist and exclusive.
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  #91  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 10:07 PM
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Originally Posted by BigCityOfDreams View Post
apparently you didn't read my post Brudy... My point stands that the grit and rawness of Downtown Los Angeles are one of the key variables leading to its renaissance, and should be embraced ... The same thing that many here seem to want: a clean sterile downtown are the exact things that have left Brooklyn cooler than Manhattan, and Oakland cooler than SF, and on the adverse have left the sterile shells of cities past elitist and exclusive.
Dude, Brooklyn is over and Oakland is on the horizon. People are not attracted to the grit and rawness unless they're from the local burbs trying to feel cool about the city. People were initially attracted because you could get cheap awesome spaces. You could walk for some stuff. Downtown offered an urban experience unlike the rest of LA. I've lived here for years now and nobody likes the grit (aka homelessness) and my math skills aren't good enough to count the number of people who've left because of it. Oakland will be over soon because SF is so pricey. It all runs down hill. BTW, how many corpses have you seen in downtown? I'm at three, others I know have seen more. Wow, that's cool.

Downtown will never have it's late 80's Greenwich Village moment. That perfect slice of time in the gentrification process where it's still cool to live there and have independent shops, a place where artists and musicians and families could live. Or maybe that was 2007 or something on a small scale. Things have progressed too fast and the economics are against it.

If the kind of people who are moving to downtown are the kind of people who think watching people shoot up is cool and adds a cinematic quality to their 'urban' lives, then downtown is already dead.
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  #92  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 10:35 PM
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Originally Posted by caligrad View Post
^^^ yeah, I am a bit confused as well. I went to the old thread to see if I missed anything before I logged in. Resident was the first to say it broke ground. Others said it didn't, some on SSC were quick to say no. reading commentary on other sites, some say its more soil testing, some say they found storage tanks or something.

Anyone actually know what's going on with that one?
Everyone was quick to jump to conclusion that it had indeed broken ground but it was in the end a false alarm. There were some undetected storage tanks on the site and they had to remove them. Although Hunter did email CIM and they told him that they would be breaking ground in Spring.

For the earlier topic, while the rundown 1-4 story buildings make the city look very "ghetto" they're much better than if nothing was there at all. Detroit made that mistake and now it's a wasteland. I'm all for them being replaced with 10-12 story buildings but I'd want them to be there until it happens. Shomof is going to be demoing that massive 2 story mall next month(I've heard rumors he sold, is he still working with the project?). I hope he'll be quick with the tower. I don't want a CIM situation where we're stuck with the lot as the project stalls
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  #93  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 10:37 PM
BigCityOfDreams BigCityOfDreams is offline
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Brudy, I appreciate your response but you may be projecting? Who is saying that corpses or people shooting up are cool and add to "cinematic experience" these are larger societal issues... People like the Mission in SF, Uptown Oakland, the Historic Core, Williamsburg, East Austin, Wicker Park, Bushwick etc etc for the same reason - they offer an authentic diverse (economically, socially, racially, culturally) urban experience. South Park is great, I walk there often, but most of the folks that live there don't take their guests to LA Live, they take them to a cafe on Spring Street. Removing the grit (read swapmeets, street vendors, dive bars, hole in the wall eateries) will turn Downtown in to an inner city version of Victoria Gardens or the Spectrum (see Santa Monica, Old Pas)
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  #94  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 11:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Mojeda101 View Post
Everyone was quick to jump to conclusion that it had indeed broken ground but it was in the end a false alarm. There were some undetected storage tanks on the site and they had to remove them. Although Hunter did email CIM and they told him that they would be breaking ground in Spring.

For the earlier topic, while the rundown 1-4 story buildings make the city look very "ghetto" they're much better than if nothing was there at all. Detroit made that mistake and now it's a wasteland. I'm all for them being replaced with 10-12 story buildings but I'd want them to be there until it happens. Shomof is going to be demoing that massive 2 story mall next month(I've heard rumors he sold, is he still working with the project?). I hope he'll be quick with the tower. I don't want a CIM situation where we're stuck with the lot as the project stalls
At least it's good to see some kind of activity at the 888 Hope site after it being inactive for a while.

I'll be moving near LA Union Station in a couple days and I'll be able to take a lot more picture updates for the forum!
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  #95  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2016, 11:55 PM
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Originally Posted by BigCityOfDreams View Post
Who is saying that corpses or people shooting up are cool and add to "cinematic experience"
People into that would be seriously screwy in the head. That sounds like serial killer-esque behavior and I don't think that's the type of people who would move downtown
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  #96  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2016, 12:21 AM
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Originally Posted by King Kill 'em View Post
People into that would be seriously screwy in the head. That sounds like serial killer-esque behavior and I don't think that's the type of people who would move downtown

But that's the reality of living here. That's the grit he's talking about and saying people want.

I have a 101 fever so I'm a little out of my mind right now.
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  #97  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2016, 12:41 AM
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DTLA will never become as completely sterile as Downtown Santa Monica or Downtown Pasadena. Most rich people in the region like to live by the beach or by the mountains, Santa Monica is by the beach and Pasadena is by the mountains. DTLA is surrounded almost entirely by lower income neighborhoods in the basin, and LA's wealthy class in the westside aren't likely to make a huge shift over to DTLA.

What's fueling DTLA's renaissance is the appeal it has on young professionals and artists. Gentrification is necessary to attract a lot of these new residents. With that in mind, there will be those that prefer a mix of safe generic shops and restaurants mixed in with the gritty, hip indie hangouts. I think this should be the goal and is what will likely happen, it doesn't have to be one or the other.
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  #98  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2016, 1:10 AM
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But that's the reality of living here. That's the grit he's talking about and saying people want.

I have a 101 fever so I'm a little out of my mind right now.
They want the grit in terms of cool graffiti and old brick buildings. People don't want to see dead bodies and stuff like that which ellicit an emotional response.

Sorry about your fever. Hope you feel better
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  #99  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2016, 1:26 AM
BigCityOfDreams BigCityOfDreams is offline
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Originally Posted by ByTheBay View Post
DTLA will never become as completely sterile as Downtown Santa Monica or Downtown Pasadena. Most rich people in the region like to live by the beach or by the mountains, Santa Monica is by the beach and Pasadena is by the mountains. DTLA is surrounded almost entirely by lower income neighborhoods in the basin, and LA's wealthy class in the westside aren't likely to make a huge shift over to DTLA.

What's fueling DTLA's renaissance is the appeal it has on young professionals and artists. Gentrification is necessary to attract a lot of these new residents. With that in mind, there will be those that prefer a mix of safe generic shops and restaurants mixed in with the gritty, hip indie hangouts. I think this should be the goal and is what will likely happen, it doesn't have to be one or the other.
I very much agree. I love going for a nice dinner in the Financial District followed by a raucous night in the Historic Core after a day of shopping at the swapmeets and street vendors in the Toy District for items ranging from Himalayan sea salt lamps to hand woven Nepalese shirts (all at prices far cheaper than anywhere else in the country). This is what makes DTLA so special, its diversity. SF, Manhattan, etc are increasingly becoming homogeneous, and (despite their beautiful architecture and geography) are beginning to resemble the suburbs that surround them.
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  #100  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2016, 1:40 AM
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Originally Posted by BigCityOfDreams View Post
Brudy, I appreciate your response but you may be projecting? Who is saying that corpses or people shooting up are cool and add to "cinematic experience" these are larger societal issues... People like the Mission in SF, Uptown Oakland, the Historic Core, Williamsburg, East Austin, Wicker Park, Bushwick etc etc for the same reason - they offer an authentic diverse (economically, socially, racially, culturally) urban experience. South Park is great, I walk there often, but most of the folks that live there don't take their guests to LA Live, they take them to a cafe on Spring Street. Removing the grit (read swapmeets, street vendors, dive bars, hole in the wall eateries) will turn Downtown in to an inner city version of Victoria Gardens or the Spectrum (see Santa Monica, Old Pas)
lol no

"gentrifiers" move to those places because they've been priced out of the more desirable neighborhoods.
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