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  #121  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2017, 8:26 PM
Shift Shift is offline
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Great photo of tall buildings all over Burnaby and New West!

This phenomenon is only happening because of the tight restrictions when it comes to building tall towers in Vancouver. If developers had a choice, they would put many of the current towers they are building in the suburbs along West Broadway and Cambie corridor, in Kitsilano, Olympic Village, Commercial/Broadway, Strathcona, Chinatown, etc. Alas, Vancouver's policies and Vancouverites drive them away to greener pastures. Well, Vancouver's loss is the suburb's gain.
Really? Because Toronto's suburbs are equally as dotted with towers. No height restrictions there.

Developers would be searching for sites in surrounding cities regardless - lower land prices, available sites, rapid transit access, population growth to these areas. Not to mention the Community Plans for all these cities designate / zone for high rises, irrespective of what Vancouver is doing.

A region with all your density in one central core with nothing but lower density elsewhere is bad planning anyway, and a very dated concept.

Also 'suburbs' is becoming an outdated term to describe the cities surrounding Vancouver at this point. Becoming more a region of distinct cities, all tied to Vancouver still of course.
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  #122  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2017, 11:40 PM
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I second that. It's better to have multi nodes instead of trying to force everyone to travel to one core.

It's part of why downtown Vancouver is *the* NoF downtown while downtown Surrey is being made into *the* SoF downtown. Meanwhile most of the cities in the region are creating their own mini downtowns.

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  #123  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2017, 2:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Shift View Post
Really? Because Toronto's suburbs are equally as dotted with towers. No height restrictions there.

Developers would be searching for sites in surrounding cities regardless - lower land prices, available sites, rapid transit access, population growth to these areas. Not to mention the Community Plans for all these cities designate / zone for high rises, irrespective of what Vancouver is doing.

A region with all your density in one central core with nothing but lower density elsewhere is bad planning anyway, and a very dated concept.

Also 'suburbs' is becoming an outdated term to describe the cities surrounding Vancouver at this point. Becoming more a region of distinct cities, all tied to Vancouver still of course.
The dotted skylines of Toronto are still within the City of Toronto, not actually outside or the GTA, with the exception of Mississauga, which is pretty far away. Other areas do not see a lot of new skyscraper construction, unlike the many different cities of the Lower Mainland. Also, at 7mil., Toronto has a way bigger population than Vancouver.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheba View Post
I second that. It's better to have multi nodes instead of trying to force everyone to travel to one core.

It's part of why downtown Vancouver is *the* NoF downtown while downtown Surrey is being made into *the* SoF downtown. Meanwhile most of the cities in the region are creating their own mini downtowns.

It's just the way we North Americans are used to how our cities are set up, that is, a very inefficient use of space, and that has made what the Lower Mainland is today. If our city was better constructed and planned from the beginning, the "core" that you mentioned could stretch from downtown all the way to Kerrisdale, and as far as Kingsway and King Edward area, with various high density commercial zones throughout. In this case, we don't even need far-flung places like Langley or Maple Ridge to exist in the first place. People in Vancouver can pretty much walk everywhere and catch all modes of public transport, and we won't be one of the biggest polluters of this planet, like the rest of North America. Coquitlam and Surrey would be the present Abbotsford or Chilliwack.

Last edited by Vin; Dec 14, 2017 at 3:38 AM.
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  #124  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2018, 7:27 PM
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Still not impressed by the details on the top.


thinkbosa.com
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  #125  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2018, 2:38 AM
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Clear glass and spandrel everywhere. Why don't they show that in the renders. Oh right because it's ugly as hell.

Yeah the top could be a bit more dramatic.
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  #126  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2018, 5:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Vin View Post
The dotted skylines of Toronto are still within the City of Toronto, not actually outside or the GTA, with the exception of Mississauga, which is pretty far away. Other areas do not see a lot of new skyscraper construction, unlike the many different cities of the Lower Mainland. Also, at 7mil., Toronto has a way bigger population than Vancouver.
There's a reason why the different centres outside the centre of Toronto are all part of The City of Toronto. They were all amalgamated in 1998. Before that there were six different municipalities. That was the most recent of a series of amalgamations and mergers of former towns and villages over more than a century.

Following your 'logic', then all the towers should actually be in New Westminster, which was capital of British Columbia before anybody from a European origin was living in what we call Vancouver today. Fort Langley was there even earlier - although the original fort was a bit further along the river.
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  #127  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2018, 9:17 AM
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Toroto's various skyscraper clusters started appearing AFTER amalgamation. Therefore the modern City of Toronto is doing very well in densification, despite having so much land.

On the other hand , it's a good thing that the Lower Mainland cities are NOT amalgamated. Because of that, it is very nice to see new skylines appearing in other cities outside Vancouver today. If it were amalgamated as greater city of Vancouver, we would have a huge urban sprawl today, with viewcones policies enacted everywhere.

At least New Westminster is more progressive lately when it comes to desnification. I rather see the rest of the region amalgamated with New West than City of Vancouver .
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  #128  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2018, 3:06 PM
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No. They didn't start appearing after amalgamation. They got taller like with the rest of the world. It's also pretty arbitrary to go by municipal boundaries when the two cities are structured so differently. Toronto is 650 square kilometres. Vancouver is 100? 120? And, it's also not just Mississauga building high rise clusters in those outer suburbs. It's the thing to do now to build a cluster of high rises.
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  #129  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2018, 11:17 PM
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  #130  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2018, 6:09 PM
Vin Vin is online now
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Originally Posted by WhipperSnapper View Post
No. They didn't start appearing after amalgamation. They got taller like with the rest of the world. It's also pretty arbitrary to go by municipal boundaries when the two cities are structured so differently. Toronto is 650 square kilometres. Vancouver is 100? 120? And, it's also not just Mississauga building high rise clusters in those outer suburbs. It's the thing to do now to build a cluster of high rises.
Any pictures of the suburbs that weren't part of Toronto with tall towers prior to 1998 that you care to share?

See the last photo of the shot from CN tower towards Mississauga in the 1990s (before amalgamation):

https://www.blogto.com/city/2016/09/..._eerily_empty/


Also, it's not a thing to build a cluster of high rises in Vancouver proper, contrary to what you are saying. It may be changing, but the city has resisted that for the longest time.
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  #131  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2018, 4:25 PM
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Bosa has put up construction fencing surrounding the portion of the parking lot that had been barricaded off to vehicles. Now the only pedestrian access between River Market and Pier Park is to either go down the other side of the train tracks (Front or Columbia to the 4th St elevator) or to go through the actual parking lot where vehicles are allowed.
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  #132  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2018, 4:55 PM
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sales center closed down until 2nd phase, they seem to also be holding back units from the price jumps that have already been done
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